Elba AL Funeral Homes

Elba AL funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Coleman Hammond Funeral Home by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Elba funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Funeral Flowers

Express your deepest sympathies - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Sympathy Roses

Give comfort and loving support — order a delivery today!

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

Standing Sprays

Heart-felt tributes to honor a dear friend or loved one who has passed away

Coleman Hammond Funeral Home

191 Jackson Avenue
Elba, AL 36323
(334) 897-2215
Coleman Hammond Funeral Home funeral flowers

Hayes Funeral Home

431 East Davis
Elba, AL 36323
(334) 897-2225
Hayes Funeral Home funeral flowers

Elba AL Obituaries and Death Notices

Gary G. Taylor, 70, Arnold - Leader Publications

Monday, June 19, 2017

Taylor of Imperial, Lora (Tim) Ablen of Imperial and Adam (Jess) Taylor of Fenton; three grandchildren: Lucas Abeln and Kelsie and Austin Brown; two siblings-in-law: Agnes (Berv) Goddard and Jim (Melba) Stricker; and many nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews, cousins, and friends.He was preceded in death by a sister: Allene (Tom) McGlynn; and two siblings-in-law: Alberta (Tom) Duchek and Charles (Pat) Stricker.A celebration of life is scheduled from 1-3 p.m. Sunday, June 4, at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, in St. Louis County. Memorials may be made to Friends of Kids with Cancer, 530 Maryville Centre Drive, Suite LL5, St. Louis, 63141; or to a charity of the donor’s choice. Arrangements are under the direction of Kutis Funeral Home.

Crabby Floyd: A hard worker with a quick wit - The Laker/Lutz News

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Besides his wife, Lorraine, DeForest is survived by his son, Floyd R.; his daughter, Candace; his mother, Elba; his brother, Rick and his wife, Loretta; nephews, a great niece and other family members and friends.Ortiz said DeForest is the kind of man who deserved to be remembered.“There are people out there that do things every day, and they don’t go out looking for credit, and they don’t go looking for accolades. That’s just them. That’s the kind of guy that Floyd was,” Ortiz said.“I’m going to miss him terribly. I already miss seeing him,” Ortiz said.Memorial service for Floyd DeForest7 p.m., March 5 at Loyless Funeral Home, 5310 Land O’ Lakes Blvd.The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Floyd DeForest’s memory to Gulfside HospicePublished March 4, 2015Share this:Like this:LikeLoading...

Rita Woodward

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Lincoln, Nebraska.Following a blind date and a year of dating, Rita married Harold Woodward on November 8, 1970 in Scotia, Nebraska. During Rita and Harold’s early years in Elba, Nebraska, Rita enjoyed a large garden and she always made sure their neighbors and hired help had a huge spread of food to keep them going. They welcomed their first child, Dianna Lynn, on the farm in 1972.In her early 20’s, Rita began a battle with breast cancer. Rita beat cancer and was the first woman on record at M.D. Anderson to continue her family following extensive chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Rita and Harold went on to have three boys, Justin Reed (1980), Matthew Duane (1982), and Brian Wayne (1986).Over the years, Rita made her home in Iowa, Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky, and finally Jefferson City, Mo. Her commitment to her family and involvement in church were her mainstay. Rita loved to share with others her gift of hospitality and was involved in Christian Women’s Fellowships groups in every city in which they lived. She loved sharing homemaking advice, authoring cookbooks, and encouraging young women through programs such as Apples to Gold. Rita invested generously in the lives of those around her. Her legacy will be defined by her deep compassion and the unconditional love she held for her children and grandchildren.Survivors include: her loving husband of 46 years, Harold Woodward; three sons, Justin Reed Woodward (wife Janelle) of Miami, Fl., Matthew Duane Woodward (wife Jennifer) of Mt. Vernon, Mo., and Brian Wayne Woodward of Kansas City, Mo.; her mother, Mary Jane Hansen of Scotia, Nebraska; three brothers, Galen Stanley Hansen (...

Obituary: Loleta May Merrill - Twin Falls Times-News

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Intermountain Medical Center, after suffering a stroke on Tuesday, March 21. She was 88 years old and always lived her life to the fullest.She was born on her family’s ranch at Cassia Creek, near Elba, Idaho, on April 15, 1928, the daughter of Etta Eveline Rich and Lot Smith Udy. She was the sixth of seven children and she had a twin brother, Lyle. She rode horseback to the Elba grade school each day. She attended Malta High School and when her parents sold the ranch, she finished her schooling at Burley High School.On Nov. 29, 1944, she married Wayne May in Burley, Idaho. They were blessed with five children, Linda, Gay Dawn, Marlin, Marshall, and Mervin. They worked together farming for the first few years of their marriage. In 1952, they leased the original Farmer’s Corner store just south of Burley. Two years later, they built a new store across the street and continued in the grocery and fuel business until November of 1963, when they sold the store and purchased Valley Livestock Commission Company in Rupert, Idaho. This business was very successful for Wayne and Loleta, due in part, to many faithful buyers and livestock producers, as well as dedicated employees. Wayne became ill in the fall of 1972, and passed away at age 49 from a malignant brain tumor. Loleta continued to run the business until the proper...

Former Delaware Secretary of Labor Stafford reflects on the legacy of his father - Dover Post

Monday, March 13, 2017

The sixth-grade education he received served him well, as he never went back to school.His first job, earning 75 cents an hour, was hauling sawdust in a wheelbarrow. In 1941, Stafford was hired by the Missouri Pacific railroad as a laborer, but instead ended up working as a cook for one of the railway’s senior administrators.This assignment violated company policy and after 12 years Stafford was reassigned, again as a laborer. He ended up carrying a pair of two-gallon buckets of water for the next decade, helping to quench the thirsts of the 50 or 60 men laboring in the heat of an Arkansas summer.Laid off in 1950, Stafford worked as horse groomer and scrap iron dealer before returning to the railroad. There, his hard work and reputation led to jobs of increasing responsibility, culminating as a supervising foreman before his retirement in 1982.Along the way, Stafford married Beatrice Bragg. Their first home, four acres of land and a leaky house, was purchased for $175. Beatrice brought in additional income as a domestic worker, but continued her education while raising their children. She eventually earned a Master’s Degree in Elementary Education and worked as a teacher for more than 30 years.Stafford coped with the restrictions of being a black man in the Deep South over much of his lifetime. Even fun family outings were dampened by the ever-present Jim Crow, forcing him to use the back door of the local Dairy Queen because the staff would not serve a black man in the front of the store.“He’d be so dejected when he came back,” Harold recalled. “He was embarrassed but he’d always say there’s a brighter day ahead.”Stafford, however, didn’t become involved in the civil rights movement of the 60s.“I’m not saying he never felt bitter or that he wasn’t happy about the condition under which he and other blacks lived at the time,” Harold said. “His concern was to make the best of a bad situation.”Stafford always encouraged his children to better themselves through education.“It was always very strongly enforced in the family that education was the key to equal opportunity in America,” Harold said. “And we always were told you can’t expect to be given anything in this world, you have to go out and make it happen.”Harold said it was important that he write the book about his father.“First off, I wanted the Stafford family to know about him,” he said. “I learned a lot of things that they didn’t know, I felt an obligation to tell the story.“Also, I see my dad as an unsung, unseen hero,” Harold added. “I wanted to chronicle his life so that our family, our friends and our community and maybe the...

The Town Crier: Truckin' - The Daily Citizen

Monday, March 06, 2017

Rogers Dye House or Crown Laundry they would wheelbarrow it in to where it was needed.The three trucks consisted of a dump truck for mainly dirt, coal, salt and sand, and two trucks that had the removable wooden wall sections for all kinds of things. They used Ford and International and the drivers would challenge each other as to which could pull more. A big truck like that is never a speed demon so it was about strength and not speed.Another bulk delivery item was bricks which at this time were shipped in also. The men could pull off a section of the wooden siding and toss the bricks four at a time to load the trucks, like a cigar box juggling act in vaudeville.Earning something the old-fashioned wayThe Truck Company was known in town and folks would call Fraker's to get them to help move furniture. I can just picture those guys fighting a piano up steep stairs like Laurel and Hardy! They could also put a crew together to do handyman jobs like cleaning gutters, which they did at the Frakers' house as well.When they got busy they added on hourly workers, and in summer or weekends the kids would join in when they got big enough. This work ethic helped inspire Pop's grandson Curtis Rivers Jr. to pick up extra jobs in town and save up for a 10-speed bike he wanted. There's something about earning something the old-fashioned way ... especially if it's the first something in the neighborhood like that 10-speed was. For the kids helping at the "truck stop" behind Fraker's one of the treats was a foot-long for lunch from the Cremo across the tracks.The trucks had a second life for the black community. Sometimes Pop would leave in the morning from the east side of town and the kids would catch a ride on the truck to school. It got you there faster and for a kid, it's always fun riding the back of a truck.On certain weekends the kids would load up the trucks and go to the "colored...

Obituary: Earl Burke Heaton - Twin Falls Times-News

Monday, February 27, 2017

Brian) Hansen of Standrod, Utah, Jon (Tresa) Heaton of Mapleton, Utah, Jex (Lanise) Heaton of North Ogden, Utah, Rod (Shelley) Heaton of Payson, Utah, Tenaly Bleak of Otis, Colo., Amy (Joey) Wight of Elba, Idaho, Tyler (Robin) Heaton of Panaca, Nev., and Jed (Meshia) Heaton of Standrod, Utah; his numerous grandchildren; two sisters, Elaine Hoyt of Glendale, Utah, and Nanell Mann of Sandy, Utah.He was preceded in death by two sons, Brent Kay Heaton and Guy Elmo Heaton; and one grandson, Porter Earl Heaton. Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inbox .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col{ margin-right: 20px; } .whatcounts-form-container .whatcounts-min .left-col{ max-width: none; margin: 0; } .whatcounts-form-container .disclaimer { font-size: 13px; line-height: 14px; margin-bottom:10px; clear:both; } .whatcounts-form-container .input-group-addon.wc-addon-captcha{ padding: 4px 10px; border-left: 0; } The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, at the Almo LDS Church, with Bishop Jason Tracy officiating. Burial will follow in the Standrod Cemetery.A viewing for family and friends will be held from 6 until 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, at the Almo LDS church and from 10 until 10:45 a.m. Saturday, prior to the service also at the church.Arrangements have been entrusted to the care of the Rasmussen Funeral Home of Burley.

Funeral Home Flowers

Elba News

Gary G. Taylor, 70, Arnold - Leader Publications

Monday, June 19, 2017

Taylor of Imperial, Lora (Tim) Ablen of Imperial and Adam (Jess) Taylor of Fenton; three grandchildren: Lucas Abeln and Kelsie and Austin Brown; two siblings-in-law: Agnes (Berv) Goddard and Jim (Melba) Stricker; and many nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews, cousins, and friends.He was preceded in death by a sister: Allene (Tom) McGlynn; and two siblings-in-law: Alberta (Tom) Duchek and Charles (Pat) Stricker.A celebration of life is scheduled from 1-3 p.m. Sunday, June 4, at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, in St. Louis County. Memorials may be made to Friends of Kids with Cancer, 530 Maryville Centre Drive, Suite LL5, St. Louis, 63141; or to a charity of the donor’s choice. Arrangements are under the direction of Kutis Funeral Home.

Crabby Floyd: A hard worker with a quick wit - The Laker/Lutz News

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Besides his wife, Lorraine, DeForest is survived by his son, Floyd R.; his daughter, Candace; his mother, Elba; his brother, Rick and his wife, Loretta; nephews, a great niece and other family members and friends.Ortiz said DeForest is the kind of man who deserved to be remembered.“There are people out there that do things every day, and they don’t go out looking for credit, and they don’t go looking for accolades. That’s just them. That’s the kind of guy that Floyd was,” Ortiz said.“I’m going to miss him terribly. I already miss seeing him,” Ortiz said.Memorial service for Floyd DeForest7 p.m., March 5 at Loyless Funeral Home, 5310 Land O’ Lakes Blvd.The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Floyd DeForest’s memory to Gulfside HospicePublished March 4, 2015Share this:Like this:LikeLoading...

Rita Woodward

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Lincoln, Nebraska.Following a blind date and a year of dating, Rita married Harold Woodward on November 8, 1970 in Scotia, Nebraska. During Rita and Harold’s early years in Elba, Nebraska, Rita enjoyed a large garden and she always made sure their neighbors and hired help had a huge spread of food to keep them going. They welcomed their first child, Dianna Lynn, on the farm in 1972.In her early 20’s, Rita began a battle with breast cancer. Rita beat cancer and was the first woman on record at M.D. Anderson to continue her family following extensive chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Rita and Harold went on to have three boys, Justin Reed (1980), Matthew Duane (1982), and Brian Wayne (1986).Over the years, Rita made her home in Iowa, Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky, and finally Jefferson City, Mo. Her commitment to her family and involvement in church were her mainstay. Rita loved to share with others her gift of hospitality and was involved in Christian Women’s Fellowships groups in every city in which they lived. She loved sharing homemaking advice, authoring cookbooks, and encouraging young women through programs such as Apples to Gold. Rita invested generously in the lives of those around her. Her legacy will be defined by her deep compassion and the unconditional love she held for her children and grandchildren.Survivors include: her loving husband of 46 years, Harold Woodward; three sons, Justin Reed Woodward (wife Janelle) of Miami, Fl., Matthew Duane Woodward (wife Jennifer) of Mt. Vernon, Mo., and Brian Wayne Woodward of Kansas City, Mo.; her mother, Mary Jane Hansen of Scotia, Nebraska; three brothers, Galen Stanley Hansen (...

Obituary: Loleta May Merrill - Twin Falls Times-News

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Intermountain Medical Center, after suffering a stroke on Tuesday, March 21. She was 88 years old and always lived her life to the fullest.She was born on her family’s ranch at Cassia Creek, near Elba, Idaho, on April 15, 1928, the daughter of Etta Eveline Rich and Lot Smith Udy. She was the sixth of seven children and she had a twin brother, Lyle. She rode horseback to the Elba grade school each day. She attended Malta High School and when her parents sold the ranch, she finished her schooling at Burley High School.On Nov. 29, 1944, she married Wayne May in Burley, Idaho. They were blessed with five children, Linda, Gay Dawn, Marlin, Marshall, and Mervin. They worked together farming for the first few years of their marriage. In 1952, they leased the original Farmer’s Corner store just south of Burley. Two years later, they built a new store across the street and continued in the grocery and fuel business until November of 1963, when they sold the store and purchased Valley Livestock Commission Company in Rupert, Idaho. This business was very successful for Wayne and Loleta, due in part, to many faithful buyers and livestock producers, as well as dedicated employees. Wayne became ill in the fall of 1972, and passed away at age 49 from a malignant brain tumor. Loleta continued to run the business until the proper...

Former Delaware Secretary of Labor Stafford reflects on the legacy of his father - Dover Post

Monday, March 13, 2017

The sixth-grade education he received served him well, as he never went back to school.His first job, earning 75 cents an hour, was hauling sawdust in a wheelbarrow. In 1941, Stafford was hired by the Missouri Pacific railroad as a laborer, but instead ended up working as a cook for one of the railway’s senior administrators.This assignment violated company policy and after 12 years Stafford was reassigned, again as a laborer. He ended up carrying a pair of two-gallon buckets of water for the next decade, helping to quench the thirsts of the 50 or 60 men laboring in the heat of an Arkansas summer.Laid off in 1950, Stafford worked as horse groomer and scrap iron dealer before returning to the railroad. There, his hard work and reputation led to jobs of increasing responsibility, culminating as a supervising foreman before his retirement in 1982.Along the way, Stafford married Beatrice Bragg. Their first home, four acres of land and a leaky house, was purchased for $175. Beatrice brought in additional income as a domestic worker, but continued her education while raising their children. She eventually earned a Master’s Degree in Elementary Education and worked as a teacher for more than 30 years.Stafford coped with the restrictions of being a black man in the Deep South over much of his lifetime. Even fun family outings were dampened by the ever-present Jim Crow, forcing him to use the back door of the local Dairy Queen because the staff would not serve a black man in the front of the store.“He’d be so dejected when he came back,” Harold recalled. “He was embarrassed but he’d always say there’s a brighter day ahead.”Stafford, however, didn’t become involved in the civil rights movement of the 60s.“I’m not saying he never felt bitter or that he wasn’t happy about the condition under which he and other blacks lived at the time,” Harold said. “His concern was to make the best of a bad situation.”Stafford always encouraged his children to better themselves through education.“It was always very strongly enforced in the family that education was the key to equal opportunity in America,” Harold said. “And we always were told you can’t expect to be given anything in this world, you have to go out and make it happen.”Harold said it was important that he write the book about his father.“First off, I wanted the Stafford family to know about him,” he said. “I learned a lot of things that they didn’t know, I felt an obligation to tell the story.“Also, I see my dad as an unsung, unseen hero,” Harold added. “I wanted to chronicle his life so that our family, our friends and our community and maybe the...

The Town Crier: Truckin' - The Daily Citizen

Monday, March 06, 2017

Rogers Dye House or Crown Laundry they would wheelbarrow it in to where it was needed.The three trucks consisted of a dump truck for mainly dirt, coal, salt and sand, and two trucks that had the removable wooden wall sections for all kinds of things. They used Ford and International and the drivers would challenge each other as to which could pull more. A big truck like that is never a speed demon so it was about strength and not speed.Another bulk delivery item was bricks which at this time were shipped in also. The men could pull off a section of the wooden siding and toss the bricks four at a time to load the trucks, like a cigar box juggling act in vaudeville.Earning something the old-fashioned wayThe Truck Company was known in town and folks would call Fraker's to get them to help move furniture. I can just picture those guys fighting a piano up steep stairs like Laurel and Hardy! They could also put a crew together to do handyman jobs like cleaning gutters, which they did at the Frakers' house as well.When they got busy they added on hourly workers, and in summer or weekends the kids would join in when they got big enough. This work ethic helped inspire Pop's grandson Curtis Rivers Jr. to pick up extra jobs in town and save up for a 10-speed bike he wanted. There's something about earning something the old-fashioned way ... especially if it's the first something in the neighborhood like that 10-speed was. For the kids helping at the "truck stop" behind Fraker's one of the treats was a foot-long for lunch from the Cremo across the tracks.The trucks had a second life for the black community. Sometimes Pop would leave in the morning from the east side of town and the kids would catch a ride on the truck to school. It got you there faster and for a kid, it's always fun riding the back of a truck.On certain weekends the kids would load up the trucks and go to the "colored...

Obituary: Earl Burke Heaton - Twin Falls Times-News

Monday, February 27, 2017

Brian) Hansen of Standrod, Utah, Jon (Tresa) Heaton of Mapleton, Utah, Jex (Lanise) Heaton of North Ogden, Utah, Rod (Shelley) Heaton of Payson, Utah, Tenaly Bleak of Otis, Colo., Amy (Joey) Wight of Elba, Idaho, Tyler (Robin) Heaton of Panaca, Nev., and Jed (Meshia) Heaton of Standrod, Utah; his numerous grandchildren; two sisters, Elaine Hoyt of Glendale, Utah, and Nanell Mann of Sandy, Utah.He was preceded in death by two sons, Brent Kay Heaton and Guy Elmo Heaton; and one grandson, Porter Earl Heaton. Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inbox .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col{ margin-right: 20px; } .whatcounts-form-container .whatcounts-min .left-col{ max-width: none; margin: 0; } .whatcounts-form-container .disclaimer { font-size: 13px; line-height: 14px; margin-bottom:10px; clear:both; } .whatcounts-form-container .input-group-addon.wc-addon-captcha{ padding: 4px 10px; border-left: 0; } The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, at the Almo LDS Church, with Bishop Jason Tracy officiating. Burial will follow in the Standrod Cemetery.A viewing for family and friends will be held from 6 until 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, at the Almo LDS church and from 10 until 10:45 a.m. Saturday, prior to the service also at the church.Arrangements have been entrusted to the care of the Rasmussen Funeral Home of Burley.