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Sconiers Funeral Home

512 West Watts Street
Enterprise, AL 36330
(334) 347-2371
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Searcy Funeral Home

305 Plaza Drive
Enterprise, AL 36330
(334) 347-2517
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Enterprise AL Obituaries and Death Notices

Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Memphis Commercial Appeal carried the headline “Nitta Yuma Is Up To Date.”The story said Nitta Yuma was “entitled to distinction as the most remarkable town on earth, in point of enterprise and metropolitan progress.”It went on to say, “Nitta Yuma’s single street is illuminated by electricity” thanks to the “enterprise and liberality of Henry Phelps, the proprietor of one of the stores.” It described Phelps as an “accomplished electrician.”SEE ALSO: Town of Rodney retains mystical beauty - and 13 residentsFamily members whose roots are 200 years deep in this fertile soil want to share Nitta Yuma with the world, and they have plenty to look at — including nine buildings constructed before the Civil War.“A lot of people preserve their home place, the house they grew up in,” says 60-year-old Henry Vick Phelps III, who grew up on this property and and still lives here, as does his sister, Carolyn May, and his 28-year-old son, Vick. “But we went a little further and kept the other buildings, too.”Phelps credits his grandparents, Henry and Dorothy Phelps, for having the good sense to let the structures be.“We’d like to have a coffee shop, a place where people can stop and relax and then go through the buildings,” Phelps says. “We want to reconstruct the houses back to their original form. We’d like to work with the Delta and serve as an ambassador for the South and for tourism. It’s not going to happen overnight, but it’s something we can do steady along.“I think our audience would be anyone with a passion for old houses and the South and architecture.”Bear tracks and buried dollsNitta Yuma means “bear track” or “trail of the bear” in the Choctaw language.It was settled in 1768, with an original population of 25. In 1805, Burwell Vick purchased the land with jewels from the Choctaws.The land eventually became a plantation owned by Vick’s son, W.H. Vick, who developed what's called the 100 cotton seed in 1843, a seed that that helped planters maximize pounds of cotton per acre and was eventually sold commercially.BILLY WATKINS: Tale of the kid who couldn't throwIn 1901, when the nearly 6,000 acres was divided among the four children, Henry Phelps became owner of the family homestead. It’s now in the hands of his grandchildren and a great-grandchild.And while some of the buildings still need to be renovated, others are ready for viewing.Am...

Stephen Bode

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Bode Tile and Marble, producing exceptional designs. He retired from construction in 1996 and became employed in a supervisory role with Missouri Vocational Enterprises, MDOC, until his retirement in 2005.He enlisted in the United States Air Force, serving from 1963 to 1967 during the Vietnam War. After basic training in San Antonio, he was stationed at Perrin AFB, Denison, Texas, from 1963 to 1966 when he was transferred to Tainan AFB, Taiwan, serving with the PACAF until October 1967, when he received an honorable discharge. He attained the rank of Sergeant and was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and the Air Force Good Conduct Medal.Steve served as Mayor of St. Martins from 1986 until 1991, during which time he acted as Master of Ceremonies for the dedication of the relocation of Highway 50 through St. Martins. He served as Mayor again from 1993 until 1995. He also served two terms on the City Council and was Chairman of St. Martins Board of Adjustments. He was also a Committee Chairman with the St. Martins Bicentennial Commission from 1974 until 1976.He was a member of St. Martin Catholic Church; a charter member of St. Martin Knights of Columbus Council No. 7194; a former member of the 4th Degree, Knights of Columbus, Dan C. Coppin Assembly No. 573. He was also a member of the American Legion, Roscoe Enloe Post 5; a member of the Mid-Mo Old Car Club; a lifetime Missouri Conservation Partner; and a member of the National Rifle Association. He also had served as president and secretary of Apache Flats Lions Club, president of St. Martin Home and School Association, and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Jefferson City Jaycees.He enjoyed retreating to the Lake on summer weekends, boating and fishing. Steve also liked hunting and golfing, the St. Louis Cardinal...

Winners announced in Mississippi-Louisiana AP Competition - Idaho Statesman

Monday, April 03, 2017

Post, "Jeffery's Friends."Business: First, Kimberly Shelton, The Daily Corinthian, "Soda Shop Pops the Top Off Nostalgia"; Second, Randy Hammons, The Meridian Star, "450 Jobs"; Third, Ernest Herndon, Enterprise-Journal, "Deal Doldrums."Continuing Coverage: First, Matt Williamson, Enterprise-Journal, "Summit Church Dispute"; Second, Ernest Herndon, Enterprise-Journal, "Flood Relief"; Third, John Surratt, Terri Frazier and Staff, The Vicksburg Post, "Murder Suspect Escapes."Investigative/Public Service: First, Donna Ladd and Imani Khayyam, Jackson Free Press, "A Hunger to Live: Interrupting Violence in Jackson, Miss."; Second, Maki Somosot and Bridget Mire, The Daily Comet, "Deadly Standoff"; Third, The Vicksburg Post, "Breast Cancer."Breaking Sports: First, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "Clinton Knocks WC out of the Playoffs with Overtime Win"; Second, Teddy Renois, Thibodaux Daily Comet, "Family, Friends Thrilled for Orgeron"; Third, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "Vikings' Ride is Over."Sports Enterprise/Feature: First, Davis Potter, The Oxford Eagle, "Oxford Man Makes Name for Himself in Special Olympics"; Second, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "Summer Camps, Social Media Alter the Landscape of Football Recruiting"; Third, Kelly McElroy, The Daily Comet, "Game Changer: Local Coaches Offer Insight into Pat Summitt's Life, Impact."Editorials: First, Jackson Free Press; Second, The Meridian Star; Third, Tim Kalich, The Greenwood Commonwealth.Personal Columns: First, Kevin Cooper, The Natchez Democrat; Second, David Magee, The Oxford Eagle; Third, Tim Kalich, The Greenwood CommonwealthHeadlines: First, The Daily Corinthian, "Cost of Freon Makes AC Units a Hot Topic, Eaves Dropping, KHS Asked to Steer Clear of Texas Logo"; Second, Tim Reeves, The Vicksburg Post, "Crest Easy"; Third, Matt Williamson, Mack Spencer and Ernest Herndon, Enterprise-Journal, "Irvin Cooks Rice/Railroad Blvd. Grant Derailed/Sawdust & Splinters Loses Edge."Layout & Design: First, The Daily Comet; Second, The Daily Comet; Third, Bill Graham, Helen Reynolds and Robbie Robertson, The Meridian Star.Photo Breaking News: First, Ben Hillyer, The Natchez Democrat, "Early Morning House Fire"; Second, Nicole Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "Two Men Found Dead in Parish"; Third, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "House Fire."Photo General News: First, Bill Graham, The Meridian Star, " of The "; Second, Ben Hillyer, The Natchez Democrat, "Bye, Bye Balloons"; Third, Abby Tabor, The Daily Comet, "Finding Home."Photo Features: First, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "Walk To School"; Second, Abby Tabor, The Daily Co...

Mount Zion Baptist Church in Orange place for support, love - Washington Times

Monday, April 03, 2017

Amorren Coleman reached out for the microphone as he stood alone on the stage at Mount Zion Baptist Church, staring wide-eyed at a buzzing congregation waiting for him to perform.The Beaumont Enterprise (http://bit.ly/2mtKFvm ) reports Amorren’s voice trembled, overpowered by the band’s opening notes of “Break Every Chain.” He looked fearfully to the Rev. C.W. Crawford as the microphone dropped slowly from his mouth.Crawford cried out, “If we don’t support him now, when he wants to sing for God, who will?”Cheers rang out from the congregation.Linda Williams, a longtime church member, yelled “You can do it, baby,” from a center aisle pew.Amorren lifted the microphone back to his lips, smiled sheepishly and sang out with new confidence.“That is why we are here,” said Crawford, as Amorren returned to his seat. “To be the support for our children. To be the support the community needs.”Mount Zion, built in 1871, is widely known as Orange’s “Mother Church,” a place that nurtures spiritual and educational growth, and in its past, offered the black community sanctuary during a time of unchecked racism and segregation.“This was where blacks could come and worship, but also where you could go to get an education, an identity,” ...

Death and Funeral Notices for March 31 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, April 03, 2017

Friday at St. Peter Catholic Church. Fu­neral service 11 a.m. Saturday at St. Peter & Paul Chapel Catholic Church. Legacy Funeral Home, Over­ton. CHRISTINE JOHNSON CRAYCRAFT, 93, Mount Enterprise; Visita­tion 1 p.m. Saturday at Crawford-A. Crim. Funeral service 2 p.m. Sat­urday at Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson. WILLIAM BOMER CROOK JR., 85, Tyler; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Tyler Memorial Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Tyler Memorial Funeral Home VERNON D. DAVIS, 88, Chandler, formerly of Noonday; Graveside service 11 a.m. Saturday at Noonday Cemetery. Quinlan Funeral Home. ESTHER LORETTA (LYNN) HALE, 74, Gilmer; Visitation 3-7 p.m. Friday at Turner Brothers Mortuary. Funeral service noon Saturday at Zion Hill Baptist Church, Gilmer. Turner Brothers Mortuary, Gilmer. DEE JEAN HAWKINS, 87, Tyler; Visitation 6 p.m., rosary 7 p.m. Friday at Stewart Family Funeral Home. Mass 2 p.m. Saturday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. GUSSIE MAE HAWLEY, 93, Gladewater; Visitation 1-6 p.m. Friday at D&D All Faith Chapel. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Progressive Church, Red Rock. Dearion & Davis Funeral Parlor, Gladewater. BUTCH HOLCOMB, 74, Beulah community; Visitation 10 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home, Rusk. DESMOND JUWON WOODS JONES, 40, Mount Pleasant; Vis­itation 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday at Tumey Mortuary. Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Greater Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church. Tumey Mortuary, Mount Pleasant. CLYDE BENJAMIN KELLEY, 87, Hideaway; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Caudle-Rutledge-Daugherty Funeral Home, Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Caudle-Rutledge-Daugherty Funeral Home, Lindale. RANDALL “RANDY” KIRKPATRICK, 68, Mineola; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Hilliard Funeral Home. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Hilliard Funeral Home, Van. BOBBY L. “LUMPY” LOCKE, 82, Emerald Bay; Visitation follows service at church. Memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Emerald Bay Community Church. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. BILLY JOYCE LYON, 83, Edgewood; Memorial service 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday at Hiett’s LyBrand Funeral Home, Wills Point. TIFFANY SHAWN O’QUINN, 50, Atlanta, Georgia; Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at First United Methodist Church, Pittsburg. Er­man Smith Funeral Home, Pittsburg. RUBY (TAYLOR) PARTNEY, 81, Alba; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Wilson-Bartley Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Wilson-Bartley Funeral Home, Alba. HOWARD K. (KEN) RATCLIFF, 75, Sherman; Graveside service 11 a.m. Saturday at Rose Hill Cemetery, Brookhaven, Mississippi. Scoggins Funeral Home & Crematory, Van Alstyne. TIMOTHY RAY, 72, Tyler; Memorial service 10 a.m. Saturday at Mount Carmel Baptist Church. Hilliard Funeral Home, Van. Retired Col. DAVID H. REINER, 82, Tyler; Visitation 6-8 p.m. with rosary 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Field of Honor Mausoleum chapel. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Tyler Memorial Funeral Home. ELIZABETH RICHARD, 93, Hawkins; Funeral service noon Sat­urday at Bethlehem United Methodist Church. John R. Harmon Un­dertaking Co., Tyler. CAROLYN STAGNER, 86, Tyler; Visitation 5-7 p.m. Frid...

Death and Funeral Notices for April 1 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, April 03, 2017

Peter and Paul. Legacy Funeral Home, Over­ton. MARIE (HUGHES) BOYD, 89, Overton; Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Crawford - A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson. CHRISTINE JOHNSON CRAYCRAFT, 93, Mount Enterprise; Visita­tion 1 p.m. Saturday at Crawford-A. Crim. Funeral service 2 p.m. Sat­urday at Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson. WILLIAM BOMER CROOK JR., 85, Tyler; Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Tyler Memorial Funeral Home. VERNON D. DAVIS, 88, Chandler, formerly of Noonday; Graveside service 11 a.m. Saturday at Noonday Cemetery. Quinlan Funeral Home. SHIRLEY FOX, 83, Pittsburg; Visitation 2 p.m. Saturday at Erman Smith Funeral Home. Funeral service 3 p.m. Saturday at Erman Smith Funeral Home, Pittsburg. ESTHER LORETTA (LYNN) HALE, 74, Gilmer; Funeral service noon Saturday at Zion Hill Baptist Church, Gilmer. Turner Brothers Mortuary, Gilmer. BOBBY HAMMONS, 72, Winona; Funeral service 11 a.m. Satur­day at Mount Olive Baptist Church. McCauley & Son Funeral Home, Gladewater. DEE JEAN HAWKINS, 87, Tyler; Mass 2 p.m. Saturday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. GUSSIE MAE HAWLEY, 93, Gladewater; Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Progressive Church, Red Rock. Dearion & Davis Funeral Parlor, Gladewater. BUTCH HOLCOMB, 74, Beulah community; Visitation 10 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home, Rusk. DESMOND JUWON WOODS JONES, 40, Mount Pleasant; Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Greater Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church. Tumey Mortuary, Mount Pleasant. CLYDE BENJAMIN KELLEY, 87, Hideaway; Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Caudle-Rutledge-Daugherty Funeral Home, Lindale. RANDALL “RANDY” KIRKPATRICK, 68, Mineola; Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Hilliard Funeral Home, Van. BOBBY L. “LUMPY” LOCKE, 82, Emerald Bay; Visitation follows service at church. Memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Emerald Bay Community Church. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. BILLY JOYCE LYON, 83, Edgewood; Memorial service 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday at Hiett’s LyBrand Funeral Home, Wills Point. TONY MCBRIDE, 62, Ben Wheeler; Memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Heritage Trail Cowboy Church, 7302 Farm-to-Market Ro...

Bill Walsh, copy editor and witty authority on language, dies at 55 - Washington Post

Monday, March 27, 2017

Playmate is a centerfold. (The term “Playboy model” should be used gingerly, he wrote, as it could refer to women with the modeling arm of Hugh Hefner’s enterprise, in addition to those who doff their clothing for the magazine.) He rolled his eyes at silly redundancies (“Armed gunmen: They’re the worst kind”) and explained the utility, for a copy editor, of being well read. “Although the people of Pakistan are Pakistanis, the people of Afghanistan are Afghans,” he wrote in “The Elephants of Style.” “The word afghani refers solely to the country’s main unit of currency. To call an Afghan an afghani is like calling an American a dollar.”Mr. Walsh said he tried to steer clear of absolutes in language, but he had his peeves. “The semicolon is an ugly bastard,” he wrote in “Lapsing Into a Comma,” “and thus I try to avoid it.”The hyphen, however, he found beautiful — an instrument of clarity and precision. “Most people don’t understand hyphens, so they lash out against them,” he told American Journalism Review. “I’m a big advocate of the hyphen. If you write ‘the orange juice salesman,’ you have a salesman who’s orange. The orange-juice salesman is more precise.”William Francis Walsh was born in Pottsville, Pa., on Dec. 20, 1961, and completed high school in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa, Ariz. He was a 1984 journalism graduate of the University of Arizona. He worked at the now-defunct Phoenix Gazette and the Washington Times before joining The Post.In 2000, he married Dupree. Besides his wife, of Washington, survivors include his mother and stepfather, Molly Chilinski and Gary Chilinski of Eloy, Ariz.; two brothers, Terence Walsh of Frederick, Md., and Kenneth Walsh of New York City, both copy editors; and a sister, Jennifer Jaurigue of Chandler, Ariz.Mr. Walsh was a frequent presenter at conferences of the American Copy Editors Society, and in 2016 he was a keynote speaker at a gathering of the Editors Association of Canada. The New Yorker’s Norris, the other keynote presenter, recalled that Mr. Walsh “was addressing some nitpicking thing like whether or not to continue to capitalize ‘the Internet.’ The hard-liners still capitalize it (and make two words of ‘Web site,’ with the cap), although the future is clear. The kids will lower-case it, because [and this is pure Bill] what don’t they lower-case? He held out hope for them, though. He showed a slide of a beach chair and a cocktail, the implication being that once we retire — or go to our reward — they can do what they want.”Read more Washington Post obituariesRichard Solomon, Kissinger aide involved in ‘Ping-Pong diplomacy’ with China, dies at 79Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and film historian, dies at 84Joseph Wapner, judge on ‘The People’s Court,’ dies at 97...

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Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Memphis Commercial Appeal carried the headline “Nitta Yuma Is Up To Date.”The story said Nitta Yuma was “entitled to distinction as the most remarkable town on earth, in point of enterprise and metropolitan progress.”It went on to say, “Nitta Yuma’s single street is illuminated by electricity” thanks to the “enterprise and liberality of Henry Phelps, the proprietor of one of the stores.” It described Phelps as an “accomplished electrician.”SEE ALSO: Town of Rodney retains mystical beauty - and 13 residentsFamily members whose roots are 200 years deep in this fertile soil want to share Nitta Yuma with the world, and they have plenty to look at — including nine buildings constructed before the Civil War.“A lot of people preserve their home place, the house they grew up in,” says 60-year-old Henry Vick Phelps III, who grew up on this property and and still lives here, as does his sister, Carolyn May, and his 28-year-old son, Vick. “But we went a little further and kept the other buildings, too.”Phelps credits his grandparents, Henry and Dorothy Phelps, for having the good sense to let the structures be.“We’d like to have a coffee shop, a place where people can stop and relax and then go through the buildings,” Phelps says. “We want to reconstruct the houses back to their original form. We’d like to work with the Delta and serve as an ambassador for the South and for tourism. It’s not going to happen overnight, but it’s something we can do steady along.“I think our audience would be anyone with a passion for old houses and the South and architecture.”Bear tracks and buried dollsNitta Yuma means “bear track” or “trail of the bear” in the Choctaw language.It was settled in 1768, with an original population of 25. In 1805, Burwell Vick purchased the land with jewels from the Choctaws.The land eventually became a plantation owned by Vick’s son, W.H. Vick, who developed what's called the 100 cotton seed in 1843, a seed that that helped planters maximize pounds of cotton per acre and was eventually sold commercially.BILLY WATKINS: Tale of the kid who couldn't throwIn 1901, when the nearly 6,000 acres was divided among the four children, Henry Phelps became owner of the family homestead. It’s now in the hands of his grandchildren and a great-grandchild.And while some of the buildings still need to be renovated, others are ready for viewing.Am...

Stephen Bode

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Bode Tile and Marble, producing exceptional designs. He retired from construction in 1996 and became employed in a supervisory role with Missouri Vocational Enterprises, MDOC, until his retirement in 2005.He enlisted in the United States Air Force, serving from 1963 to 1967 during the Vietnam War. After basic training in San Antonio, he was stationed at Perrin AFB, Denison, Texas, from 1963 to 1966 when he was transferred to Tainan AFB, Taiwan, serving with the PACAF until October 1967, when he received an honorable discharge. He attained the rank of Sergeant and was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and the Air Force Good Conduct Medal.Steve served as Mayor of St. Martins from 1986 until 1991, during which time he acted as Master of Ceremonies for the dedication of the relocation of Highway 50 through St. Martins. He served as Mayor again from 1993 until 1995. He also served two terms on the City Council and was Chairman of St. Martins Board of Adjustments. He was also a Committee Chairman with the St. Martins Bicentennial Commission from 1974 until 1976.He was a member of St. Martin Catholic Church; a charter member of St. Martin Knights of Columbus Council No. 7194; a former member of the 4th Degree, Knights of Columbus, Dan C. Coppin Assembly No. 573. He was also a member of the American Legion, Roscoe Enloe Post 5; a member of the Mid-Mo Old Car Club; a lifetime Missouri Conservation Partner; and a member of the National Rifle Association. He also had served as president and secretary of Apache Flats Lions Club, president of St. Martin Home and School Association, and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Jefferson City Jaycees.He enjoyed retreating to the Lake on summer weekends, boating and fishing. Steve also liked hunting and golfing, the St. Louis Cardinal...

Winners announced in Mississippi-Louisiana AP Competition - Idaho Statesman

Monday, April 03, 2017

Post, "Jeffery's Friends."Business: First, Kimberly Shelton, The Daily Corinthian, "Soda Shop Pops the Top Off Nostalgia"; Second, Randy Hammons, The Meridian Star, "450 Jobs"; Third, Ernest Herndon, Enterprise-Journal, "Deal Doldrums."Continuing Coverage: First, Matt Williamson, Enterprise-Journal, "Summit Church Dispute"; Second, Ernest Herndon, Enterprise-Journal, "Flood Relief"; Third, John Surratt, Terri Frazier and Staff, The Vicksburg Post, "Murder Suspect Escapes."Investigative/Public Service: First, Donna Ladd and Imani Khayyam, Jackson Free Press, "A Hunger to Live: Interrupting Violence in Jackson, Miss."; Second, Maki Somosot and Bridget Mire, The Daily Comet, "Deadly Standoff"; Third, The Vicksburg Post, "Breast Cancer."Breaking Sports: First, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "Clinton Knocks WC out of the Playoffs with Overtime Win"; Second, Teddy Renois, Thibodaux Daily Comet, "Family, Friends Thrilled for Orgeron"; Third, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "Vikings' Ride is Over."Sports Enterprise/Feature: First, Davis Potter, The Oxford Eagle, "Oxford Man Makes Name for Himself in Special Olympics"; Second, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "Summer Camps, Social Media Alter the Landscape of Football Recruiting"; Third, Kelly McElroy, The Daily Comet, "Game Changer: Local Coaches Offer Insight into Pat Summitt's Life, Impact."Editorials: First, Jackson Free Press; Second, The Meridian Star; Third, Tim Kalich, The Greenwood Commonwealth.Personal Columns: First, Kevin Cooper, The Natchez Democrat; Second, David Magee, The Oxford Eagle; Third, Tim Kalich, The Greenwood CommonwealthHeadlines: First, The Daily Corinthian, "Cost of Freon Makes AC Units a Hot Topic, Eaves Dropping, KHS Asked to Steer Clear of Texas Logo"; Second, Tim Reeves, The Vicksburg Post, "Crest Easy"; Third, Matt Williamson, Mack Spencer and Ernest Herndon, Enterprise-Journal, "Irvin Cooks Rice/Railroad Blvd. Grant Derailed/Sawdust & Splinters Loses Edge."Layout & Design: First, The Daily Comet; Second, The Daily Comet; Third, Bill Graham, Helen Reynolds and Robbie Robertson, The Meridian Star.Photo Breaking News: First, Ben Hillyer, The Natchez Democrat, "Early Morning House Fire"; Second, Nicole Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "Two Men Found Dead in Parish"; Third, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "House Fire."Photo General News: First, Bill Graham, The Meridian Star, " of The "; Second, Ben Hillyer, The Natchez Democrat, "Bye, Bye Balloons"; Third, Abby Tabor, The Daily Comet, "Finding Home."Photo Features: First, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "Walk To School"; Second, Abby Tabor, The Daily Co...

Mount Zion Baptist Church in Orange place for support, love - Washington Times

Monday, April 03, 2017

Amorren Coleman reached out for the microphone as he stood alone on the stage at Mount Zion Baptist Church, staring wide-eyed at a buzzing congregation waiting for him to perform.The Beaumont Enterprise (http://bit.ly/2mtKFvm ) reports Amorren’s voice trembled, overpowered by the band’s opening notes of “Break Every Chain.” He looked fearfully to the Rev. C.W. Crawford as the microphone dropped slowly from his mouth.Crawford cried out, “If we don’t support him now, when he wants to sing for God, who will?”Cheers rang out from the congregation.Linda Williams, a longtime church member, yelled “You can do it, baby,” from a center aisle pew.Amorren lifted the microphone back to his lips, smiled sheepishly and sang out with new confidence.“That is why we are here,” said Crawford, as Amorren returned to his seat. “To be the support for our children. To be the support the community needs.”Mount Zion, built in 1871, is widely known as Orange’s “Mother Church,” a place that nurtures spiritual and educational growth, and in its past, offered the black community sanctuary during a time of unchecked racism and segregation.“This was where blacks could come and worship, but also where you could go to get an education, an identity,” ...

Death and Funeral Notices for March 31 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, April 03, 2017

Friday at St. Peter Catholic Church. Fu­neral service 11 a.m. Saturday at St. Peter & Paul Chapel Catholic Church. Legacy Funeral Home, Over­ton. CHRISTINE JOHNSON CRAYCRAFT, 93, Mount Enterprise; Visita­tion 1 p.m. Saturday at Crawford-A. Crim. Funeral service 2 p.m. Sat­urday at Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson. WILLIAM BOMER CROOK JR., 85, Tyler; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Tyler Memorial Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Tyler Memorial Funeral Home VERNON D. DAVIS, 88, Chandler, formerly of Noonday; Graveside service 11 a.m. Saturday at Noonday Cemetery. Quinlan Funeral Home. ESTHER LORETTA (LYNN) HALE, 74, Gilmer; Visitation 3-7 p.m. Friday at Turner Brothers Mortuary. Funeral service noon Saturday at Zion Hill Baptist Church, Gilmer. Turner Brothers Mortuary, Gilmer. DEE JEAN HAWKINS, 87, Tyler; Visitation 6 p.m., rosary 7 p.m. Friday at Stewart Family Funeral Home. Mass 2 p.m. Saturday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. GUSSIE MAE HAWLEY, 93, Gladewater; Visitation 1-6 p.m. Friday at D&D All Faith Chapel. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Progressive Church, Red Rock. Dearion & Davis Funeral Parlor, Gladewater. BUTCH HOLCOMB, 74, Beulah community; Visitation 10 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home, Rusk. DESMOND JUWON WOODS JONES, 40, Mount Pleasant; Vis­itation 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday at Tumey Mortuary. Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Greater Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church. Tumey Mortuary, Mount Pleasant. CLYDE BENJAMIN KELLEY, 87, Hideaway; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Caudle-Rutledge-Daugherty Funeral Home, Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Caudle-Rutledge-Daugherty Funeral Home, Lindale. RANDALL “RANDY” KIRKPATRICK, 68, Mineola; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Hilliard Funeral Home. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Hilliard Funeral Home, Van. BOBBY L. “LUMPY” LOCKE, 82, Emerald Bay; Visitation follows service at church. Memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Emerald Bay Community Church. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. BILLY JOYCE LYON, 83, Edgewood; Memorial service 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday at Hiett’s LyBrand Funeral Home, Wills Point. TIFFANY SHAWN O’QUINN, 50, Atlanta, Georgia; Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at First United Methodist Church, Pittsburg. Er­man Smith Funeral Home, Pittsburg. RUBY (TAYLOR) PARTNEY, 81, Alba; Visitation 6-8 p.m. Friday at Wilson-Bartley Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Wilson-Bartley Funeral Home, Alba. HOWARD K. (KEN) RATCLIFF, 75, Sherman; Graveside service 11 a.m. Saturday at Rose Hill Cemetery, Brookhaven, Mississippi. Scoggins Funeral Home & Crematory, Van Alstyne. TIMOTHY RAY, 72, Tyler; Memorial service 10 a.m. Saturday at Mount Carmel Baptist Church. Hilliard Funeral Home, Van. Retired Col. DAVID H. REINER, 82, Tyler; Visitation 6-8 p.m. with rosary 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Field of Honor Mausoleum chapel. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Tyler Memorial Funeral Home. ELIZABETH RICHARD, 93, Hawkins; Funeral service noon Sat­urday at Bethlehem United Methodist Church. John R. Harmon Un­dertaking Co., Tyler. CAROLYN STAGNER, 86, Tyler; Visitation 5-7 p.m. Frid...

Death and Funeral Notices for April 1 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, April 03, 2017

Peter and Paul. Legacy Funeral Home, Over­ton. MARIE (HUGHES) BOYD, 89, Overton; Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Crawford - A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson. CHRISTINE JOHNSON CRAYCRAFT, 93, Mount Enterprise; Visita­tion 1 p.m. Saturday at Crawford-A. Crim. Funeral service 2 p.m. Sat­urday at Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson. WILLIAM BOMER CROOK JR., 85, Tyler; Funeral service 10 a.m. Saturday at Tyler Memorial Funeral Home. VERNON D. DAVIS, 88, Chandler, formerly of Noonday; Graveside service 11 a.m. Saturday at Noonday Cemetery. Quinlan Funeral Home. SHIRLEY FOX, 83, Pittsburg; Visitation 2 p.m. Saturday at Erman Smith Funeral Home. Funeral service 3 p.m. Saturday at Erman Smith Funeral Home, Pittsburg. ESTHER LORETTA (LYNN) HALE, 74, Gilmer; Funeral service noon Saturday at Zion Hill Baptist Church, Gilmer. Turner Brothers Mortuary, Gilmer. BOBBY HAMMONS, 72, Winona; Funeral service 11 a.m. Satur­day at Mount Olive Baptist Church. McCauley & Son Funeral Home, Gladewater. DEE JEAN HAWKINS, 87, Tyler; Mass 2 p.m. Saturday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. GUSSIE MAE HAWLEY, 93, Gladewater; Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Progressive Church, Red Rock. Dearion & Davis Funeral Parlor, Gladewater. BUTCH HOLCOMB, 74, Beulah community; Visitation 10 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home. Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home, Rusk. DESMOND JUWON WOODS JONES, 40, Mount Pleasant; Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Greater Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church. Tumey Mortuary, Mount Pleasant. CLYDE BENJAMIN KELLEY, 87, Hideaway; Funeral service 2 p.m. Saturday at Caudle-Rutledge-Daugherty Funeral Home, Lindale. RANDALL “RANDY” KIRKPATRICK, 68, Mineola; Funeral service 11 a.m. Saturday at Hilliard Funeral Home, Van. BOBBY L. “LUMPY” LOCKE, 82, Emerald Bay; Visitation follows service at church. Memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Emerald Bay Community Church. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler. BILLY JOYCE LYON, 83, Edgewood; Memorial service 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday at Hiett’s LyBrand Funeral Home, Wills Point. TONY MCBRIDE, 62, Ben Wheeler; Memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Heritage Trail Cowboy Church, 7302 Farm-to-Market Ro...

Bill Walsh, copy editor and witty authority on language, dies at 55 - Washington Post

Monday, March 27, 2017

Playmate is a centerfold. (The term “Playboy model” should be used gingerly, he wrote, as it could refer to women with the modeling arm of Hugh Hefner’s enterprise, in addition to those who doff their clothing for the magazine.) He rolled his eyes at silly redundancies (“Armed gunmen: They’re the worst kind”) and explained the utility, for a copy editor, of being well read. “Although the people of Pakistan are Pakistanis, the people of Afghanistan are Afghans,” he wrote in “The Elephants of Style.” “The word afghani refers solely to the country’s main unit of currency. To call an Afghan an afghani is like calling an American a dollar.”Mr. Walsh said he tried to steer clear of absolutes in language, but he had his peeves. “The semicolon is an ugly bastard,” he wrote in “Lapsing Into a Comma,” “and thus I try to avoid it.”The hyphen, however, he found beautiful — an instrument of clarity and precision. “Most people don’t understand hyphens, so they lash out against them,” he told American Journalism Review. “I’m a big advocate of the hyphen. If you write ‘the orange juice salesman,’ you have a salesman who’s orange. The orange-juice salesman is more precise.”William Francis Walsh was born in Pottsville, Pa., on Dec. 20, 1961, and completed high school in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa, Ariz. He was a 1984 journalism graduate of the University of Arizona. He worked at the now-defunct Phoenix Gazette and the Washington Times before joining The Post.In 2000, he married Dupree. Besides his wife, of Washington, survivors include his mother and stepfather, Molly Chilinski and Gary Chilinski of Eloy, Ariz.; two brothers, Terence Walsh of Frederick, Md., and Kenneth Walsh of New York City, both copy editors; and a sister, Jennifer Jaurigue of Chandler, Ariz.Mr. Walsh was a frequent presenter at conferences of the American Copy Editors Society, and in 2016 he was a keynote speaker at a gathering of the Editors Association of Canada. The New Yorker’s Norris, the other keynote presenter, recalled that Mr. Walsh “was addressing some nitpicking thing like whether or not to continue to capitalize ‘the Internet.’ The hard-liners still capitalize it (and make two words of ‘Web site,’ with the cap), although the future is clear. The kids will lower-case it, because [and this is pure Bill] what don’t they lower-case? He held out hope for them, though. He showed a slide of a beach chair and a cocktail, the implication being that once we retire — or go to our reward — they can do what they want.”Read more Washington Post obituariesRichard Solomon, Kissinger aide involved in ‘Ping-Pong diplomacy’ with China, dies at 79Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and film historian, dies at 84Joseph Wapner, judge on ‘The People’s Court,’ dies at 97...