Grant AL Funeral Homes

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Grant Memorial Chapel Funeral Home

4930 Main Street
Grant, AL 35747
(256) 728-2000
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New Hope Funeral Home

5063 Main Street
Grant, AL 35747
(256) 723-4241
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Grant AL Obituaries and Death Notices

Jane Beederman

Monday, June 26, 2017

Asher (Cheri) and Daniel (Anna) Beederman. Loving grandmother of Rebecca Beederman, Susan (Matthew) Regan, Cathy Beederman and Maureen (Matthew) Odenwald and great-grandchildren John and Grant Regan. Dear sister of Phyllis (the late Jacob “Jack”) Bleadon and the late Iris Wildman. A former Lincolnwood resident for 60 years and an Adult Services-Reference Librarian at the Skokie Public Library for 30 years. Graveside service Monday, 3 PM at Westlawn Cemetery, 7801 W. Montrose, Norridge. Info Mitzvah Memorial Funerals, 630-Mitzvah (630-648-9824) or www.MITZVAHFUNERALS.com...

Mary Patricia Fogle, 82 - Herald-Mail Media

Monday, June 19, 2017

Charles E. Fogle Sr., whom she married Aug. 13, 1960, she leaves behind two sons, Charles Fogle Jr. and Timothy Fogle; daughter, Angela Kendle (husband Mel); granddaughter, Kayla Fogle; grandsons, Grant and Ian Fogle; sister, Helen Craig (husband Stanley); sister-in-law, Carolyn Ecker; and numerous nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her brother, Ralph Ecker.The family will receive friends Thursday, May 25, 2017, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at Hartzler Funeral Home-Libertytown, 11802 Liberty Road, Frederick.A funeral service will be Friday, May 26, 2017, at 11 a.m. at the funeral home, with the Rev. Lerry Fogle officiating. Interment will follow in Rest-haven Memorial Gardens, Frederick.Memorial contributions may be made to Frederick Church of the Brethren, 201 Fairview Ave., Frederick, MD 21701.

WALTER SANDERS - Sumter Item

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Columbia; one sister, Sally Tarver of Columbus, Ohio; 12 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren; nine sisters-in-law; four brothers-in-law; a special grandniece and nephew, Shemikia and Antwan Grant; and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.Homegoing services will be held at noon on Saturday at Mt. Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church, 7355 Camden Highway, Rembert, with the Rev. Anthony Taylor, pastor, eulogist.The family is receiving relatives and friends at the home, 5645 Borden Road, Rembert.The remains will be placed in the church at 11 a.m.The procession will leave at 11:20 a.m. from the home.Burial will be in Mt. Pisgah Missionary Baptist Churchyard cemetery.These services have been entrusted to the management and staff of Williams Funeral Home Inc., 821 N. Main St., Sumter.Online memorial messages may be sent to the family at williamsfuneralhome@sc.rr.com.Visit us on the web at www.williamsfuneralhomeinc.com.

Obituaries June 9 - South Strand news

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Georgetown and reestablished her membership at New Mt. Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church.Mrs. Foster is survived by her daughters, Margaret Drayton, Georgetown, SC and Renell Grant, Columbia, MD; her siblings, Hattie Tucker, Georgetown, SC, Ernest Tucker of Nashville, NC, Samuel Tucker, Jamaica, NY, Jacob Tucker and Willie Tucker, both of Brooklyn, NY, Hopie Cassell and Robert Tucker, both of Bronx, NY. Funeral services are entrusted to Wilds Funeral Home, LLC.Franklin HealanFranklin Healan, 94, widower of Dessie “Pat” Healan, passed away Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at Prince George Nursing Facility.A funeral service, officiated by Dr. Ted Sherrill, was held at 2 PM, Friday, June 2, 2017 in First Baptist Church of Georgetown. The family received friends inside the church from 1-2 PM, prior to the service on Friday. Interment was in Pennyroyal Memorial Gardens immediately following the service.Born August 23, 1922 in Wayne County Georgia, he was a son of the late Benjamin F. Healan and Minnie Lee Hightower Healan.Mr. Healan was a World War II veteran of the United States Army, achieving the rank of Master Sergeant. He retired as a maintenance supervisor in 1984 from International Paper after 37 ½ years of service. Mr. Healan was a member of First Baptist of Georgetown and the Spirit of Liberty Sunday School Class. He was a Master Mason and the former Worshipful Master of Winyah Lodge #40, Past Patron of OES Winyah #148, member of the Shriners and York Rite.Surviving are three stepdaughters, Blinda and LB Hutchinson of Georgetown, Lisa and Brian Warren of Myrtle Beach, and Betty Wilson of Andrews; a sister, Edna Healan of Columbus, GA; 17 grandchildren, 27 great grandchildren, and a number of nieces and nephews.In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by a daughter, Wanda Britt; a son, Larry Healan; a brother, Robert Healan; a sister, Thelma Healan; a stepson, William “Bill” Butler; and a stepdaughter, Bobbie Harrelson.Memorials may be made to First Baptist Church of Georgetown at 219 Cleland Street, Georgetown, SC 29440.Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.grahamfuneralhome.org. Arrangements by Graham Funeral Home (843) 527-4419.Mickey PostonMickey Allen Poston, 66...

How to find the joy, whatever your age - Fenton Tri County Times

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Focus on the things you’re grateful for. The longer you live, the more you lose. But as you lose people and things, life can become even more precious. When you stop taking things for granted, you appreciate and enjoy what you have even more.• Acknowledge and express your feelings. Don’t deny what you’re going through by burying your feelings. That can lead to anger, resentment and depression. Find healthy ways to process your emotions — talk with friends, write in a journal, etc.• Accept the things you can’t change. Focus instead on things you can control, like the way you choose to react to problems and situations. Face your limitations with dignity and a healthy dose of humor.• Look at the bright side. When facing major challenges, look at them as an opportunity for personal growth. If your own poor choices contributed to a stressful situation, reflect on them and learn from your mistakes.• Take daily action to deal with life’s challenges. Don’t ignore a problem and sweep it under the rug. Take at least a small step toward resolution. That will keep both the problem and the anxiety from building to a breaking point. Even a small step will build your confidence and make you feel less powerless in a situation.• Continue to find meaning and joy in your life by pursing activities you enjoy, whether it’s going out in nature, traveling on a weekend trip, visiting your grandchildren, etc.• Remember to laugh. Laughter is strong medicine for both the body and the mind. A sense of humor will get you through the tough times. Look outside of yourself and laugh at the absurdities of life.• Stay connected with others. As you age, your support network changes from your co-workers to close friends and family members. The older you get, the more friends you lose, and it’s important to continue to reach out and connect to others. Make an effort to make new friends to widen your social circle. Along with regular exercise, staying social can have the most ...

Obit Gives Us an Inside Look at Inside Journalism. It's Not Pretty. - National Review

Monday, May 01, 2017

Describing obit-writing as “a retrospective genre” and the effort to “do justice to a life” does not sufficiently explain how these summing-up stories — granted only to a few — are about life more than death. Obits, like the paper itself, go beyond reporting to establish reputation; obits certify biography and, indeed, verify history. Unlike old-time, florid local-newspaper funereal panegyrics, a Times obit declares a person’s life newsworthy, conferring a final moment of celebrity (and perhaps envy among some readers). Gould features several quick montages of famous faces, sometimes settling on a subject such as British oarsman John Fairfax, or morphing the visage of typewriter repairman Manson Whitlock with Liberace’s. Obituary writer Margalit Fox uses these examples to prove how Times obits “in the 21st century can be as rollicking and swaggering as their subjects.” This lapse, from reporting to creative writing, exposes Times journalism as not just a first draft of history. In fact, it becomes the first draft of hegemony. It creates the attitude and perspective of an institution from which habitual readers routinely, unquestioningly, take their marching orders.Times readers will figure out that much of their daily newspaper content is subjective rather than objective, smartly designed to shape their personal opinions? We witness the source of trickle-down journalism when writers and editors ponder the obit of William P. Wilson, a late adviser to John F. Kennedy, who was instrumental during the 1960 Kennedy–Nixon television debates. The writers’ sense of political mission is unmistakable. (Here is the proverbial, secretive media bubble: like-minded people talking only to themselves while the public listens in.) “I’m trying to write an entertaining piece about history for people who don’t know the history,” says obit writer Bruce Weber. It seems he wants to turn the death notice into a political platform: “One of the things I haven’t nailed yet is the effect of this debate on subsequent presidential campaigns. I haven’t figured it out yet.” How many Times readers will figure out that much of their daily newspaper content is subjective rather than objective, smartly designed to shape their personal opinions? As “inside-journalism,” Obit reveals a new problem: When everyone is sophisticated about media, there is no sophistication, only an acceptance of received wisdom and the status quo — the hegemony of the media establishment. The loquacious Margalit Fox appeals to this sense of privilege when she addresses the “real anger and real pain” of readers who complain that women and people of color are underrepresented on the obit page. She cites history’s slow social progress to explain the page’s apparent lack of progress. But it’s a tautology in place of actual research and reporting that might improve the past rather than repeating and then blaming it. This defensive professionalism comes from the commanding heights of a media class that is confident it knows how to determine what is fit to print and what is not — elites who think they know best. Early in Obit, Bruce Weber makes a quick presumption about an obit subject’s political affiliation, which makes it into print. Gould confronts the moment later and, to both her and Weber’s credit, features the reporter’s ...

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Grant News

Jane Beederman

Monday, June 26, 2017

Asher (Cheri) and Daniel (Anna) Beederman. Loving grandmother of Rebecca Beederman, Susan (Matthew) Regan, Cathy Beederman and Maureen (Matthew) Odenwald and great-grandchildren John and Grant Regan. Dear sister of Phyllis (the late Jacob “Jack”) Bleadon and the late Iris Wildman. A former Lincolnwood resident for 60 years and an Adult Services-Reference Librarian at the Skokie Public Library for 30 years. Graveside service Monday, 3 PM at Westlawn Cemetery, 7801 W. Montrose, Norridge. Info Mitzvah Memorial Funerals, 630-Mitzvah (630-648-9824) or www.MITZVAHFUNERALS.com...

Mary Patricia Fogle, 82 - Herald-Mail Media

Monday, June 19, 2017

Charles E. Fogle Sr., whom she married Aug. 13, 1960, she leaves behind two sons, Charles Fogle Jr. and Timothy Fogle; daughter, Angela Kendle (husband Mel); granddaughter, Kayla Fogle; grandsons, Grant and Ian Fogle; sister, Helen Craig (husband Stanley); sister-in-law, Carolyn Ecker; and numerous nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her brother, Ralph Ecker.The family will receive friends Thursday, May 25, 2017, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at Hartzler Funeral Home-Libertytown, 11802 Liberty Road, Frederick.A funeral service will be Friday, May 26, 2017, at 11 a.m. at the funeral home, with the Rev. Lerry Fogle officiating. Interment will follow in Rest-haven Memorial Gardens, Frederick.Memorial contributions may be made to Frederick Church of the Brethren, 201 Fairview Ave., Frederick, MD 21701.

WALTER SANDERS - Sumter Item

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Columbia; one sister, Sally Tarver of Columbus, Ohio; 12 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren; nine sisters-in-law; four brothers-in-law; a special grandniece and nephew, Shemikia and Antwan Grant; and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.Homegoing services will be held at noon on Saturday at Mt. Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church, 7355 Camden Highway, Rembert, with the Rev. Anthony Taylor, pastor, eulogist.The family is receiving relatives and friends at the home, 5645 Borden Road, Rembert.The remains will be placed in the church at 11 a.m.The procession will leave at 11:20 a.m. from the home.Burial will be in Mt. Pisgah Missionary Baptist Churchyard cemetery.These services have been entrusted to the management and staff of Williams Funeral Home Inc., 821 N. Main St., Sumter.Online memorial messages may be sent to the family at williamsfuneralhome@sc.rr.com.Visit us on the web at www.williamsfuneralhomeinc.com.

Obituaries June 9 - South Strand news

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Georgetown and reestablished her membership at New Mt. Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church.Mrs. Foster is survived by her daughters, Margaret Drayton, Georgetown, SC and Renell Grant, Columbia, MD; her siblings, Hattie Tucker, Georgetown, SC, Ernest Tucker of Nashville, NC, Samuel Tucker, Jamaica, NY, Jacob Tucker and Willie Tucker, both of Brooklyn, NY, Hopie Cassell and Robert Tucker, both of Bronx, NY. Funeral services are entrusted to Wilds Funeral Home, LLC.Franklin HealanFranklin Healan, 94, widower of Dessie “Pat” Healan, passed away Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at Prince George Nursing Facility.A funeral service, officiated by Dr. Ted Sherrill, was held at 2 PM, Friday, June 2, 2017 in First Baptist Church of Georgetown. The family received friends inside the church from 1-2 PM, prior to the service on Friday. Interment was in Pennyroyal Memorial Gardens immediately following the service.Born August 23, 1922 in Wayne County Georgia, he was a son of the late Benjamin F. Healan and Minnie Lee Hightower Healan.Mr. Healan was a World War II veteran of the United States Army, achieving the rank of Master Sergeant. He retired as a maintenance supervisor in 1984 from International Paper after 37 ½ years of service. Mr. Healan was a member of First Baptist of Georgetown and the Spirit of Liberty Sunday School Class. He was a Master Mason and the former Worshipful Master of Winyah Lodge #40, Past Patron of OES Winyah #148, member of the Shriners and York Rite.Surviving are three stepdaughters, Blinda and LB Hutchinson of Georgetown, Lisa and Brian Warren of Myrtle Beach, and Betty Wilson of Andrews; a sister, Edna Healan of Columbus, GA; 17 grandchildren, 27 great grandchildren, and a number of nieces and nephews.In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by a daughter, Wanda Britt; a son, Larry Healan; a brother, Robert Healan; a sister, Thelma Healan; a stepson, William “Bill” Butler; and a stepdaughter, Bobbie Harrelson.Memorials may be made to First Baptist Church of Georgetown at 219 Cleland Street, Georgetown, SC 29440.Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.grahamfuneralhome.org. Arrangements by Graham Funeral Home (843) 527-4419.Mickey PostonMickey Allen Poston, 66...

How to find the joy, whatever your age - Fenton Tri County Times

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Focus on the things you’re grateful for. The longer you live, the more you lose. But as you lose people and things, life can become even more precious. When you stop taking things for granted, you appreciate and enjoy what you have even more.• Acknowledge and express your feelings. Don’t deny what you’re going through by burying your feelings. That can lead to anger, resentment and depression. Find healthy ways to process your emotions — talk with friends, write in a journal, etc.• Accept the things you can’t change. Focus instead on things you can control, like the way you choose to react to problems and situations. Face your limitations with dignity and a healthy dose of humor.• Look at the bright side. When facing major challenges, look at them as an opportunity for personal growth. If your own poor choices contributed to a stressful situation, reflect on them and learn from your mistakes.• Take daily action to deal with life’s challenges. Don’t ignore a problem and sweep it under the rug. Take at least a small step toward resolution. That will keep both the problem and the anxiety from building to a breaking point. Even a small step will build your confidence and make you feel less powerless in a situation.• Continue to find meaning and joy in your life by pursing activities you enjoy, whether it’s going out in nature, traveling on a weekend trip, visiting your grandchildren, etc.• Remember to laugh. Laughter is strong medicine for both the body and the mind. A sense of humor will get you through the tough times. Look outside of yourself and laugh at the absurdities of life.• Stay connected with others. As you age, your support network changes from your co-workers to close friends and family members. The older you get, the more friends you lose, and it’s important to continue to reach out and connect to others. Make an effort to make new friends to widen your social circle. Along with regular exercise, staying social can have the most ...

Obit Gives Us an Inside Look at Inside Journalism. It's Not Pretty. - National Review

Monday, May 01, 2017

Describing obit-writing as “a retrospective genre” and the effort to “do justice to a life” does not sufficiently explain how these summing-up stories — granted only to a few — are about life more than death. Obits, like the paper itself, go beyond reporting to establish reputation; obits certify biography and, indeed, verify history. Unlike old-time, florid local-newspaper funereal panegyrics, a Times obit declares a person’s life newsworthy, conferring a final moment of celebrity (and perhaps envy among some readers). Gould features several quick montages of famous faces, sometimes settling on a subject such as British oarsman John Fairfax, or morphing the visage of typewriter repairman Manson Whitlock with Liberace’s. Obituary writer Margalit Fox uses these examples to prove how Times obits “in the 21st century can be as rollicking and swaggering as their subjects.” This lapse, from reporting to creative writing, exposes Times journalism as not just a first draft of history. In fact, it becomes the first draft of hegemony. It creates the attitude and perspective of an institution from which habitual readers routinely, unquestioningly, take their marching orders.Times readers will figure out that much of their daily newspaper content is subjective rather than objective, smartly designed to shape their personal opinions? We witness the source of trickle-down journalism when writers and editors ponder the obit of William P. Wilson, a late adviser to John F. Kennedy, who was instrumental during the 1960 Kennedy–Nixon television debates. The writers’ sense of political mission is unmistakable. (Here is the proverbial, secretive media bubble: like-minded people talking only to themselves while the public listens in.) “I’m trying to write an entertaining piece about history for people who don’t know the history,” says obit writer Bruce Weber. It seems he wants to turn the death notice into a political platform: “One of the things I haven’t nailed yet is the effect of this debate on subsequent presidential campaigns. I haven’t figured it out yet.” How many Times readers will figure out that much of their daily newspaper content is subjective rather than objective, smartly designed to shape their personal opinions? As “inside-journalism,” Obit reveals a new problem: When everyone is sophisticated about media, there is no sophistication, only an acceptance of received wisdom and the status quo — the hegemony of the media establishment. The loquacious Margalit Fox appeals to this sense of privilege when she addresses the “real anger and real pain” of readers who complain that women and people of color are underrepresented on the obit page. She cites history’s slow social progress to explain the page’s apparent lack of progress. But it’s a tautology in place of actual research and reporting that might improve the past rather than repeating and then blaming it. This defensive professionalism comes from the commanding heights of a media class that is confident it knows how to determine what is fit to print and what is not — elites who think they know best. Early in Obit, Bruce Weber makes a quick presumption about an obit subject’s political affiliation, which makes it into print. Gould confronts the moment later and, to both her and Weber’s credit, features the reporter’s ...