Uniontown AL Funeral Homes

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Julia White Funeral Home

North Street
Uniontown, AL 36786
(334) 628-2273
Julia White Funeral Home funeral flowers

White Funeral Home

101 Lucian Street
Uniontown, AL 36786
(334) 628-4911
White Funeral Home funeral flowers

Williams Funeral Home

Highway 80
Uniontown, AL 36742
(334) 628-4711
Williams Funeral Home funeral flowers

Uniontown AL Obituaries and Death Notices

Alice Tishue

Saturday, April 08, 2017

She grew up in Vichy and Varrennes-sur-Allier with lots of close family nearby. She left Paris, France after WWII to marry former US Army G.I. Charles W. Tishue on March 25th, 1946 in Uniontown, PA. They met when Charles served under Patton’s 5th Infantry Division in the European Theater where he was decorated with a Bronze Star. Alice was a very caring and serving wife and mother. She loved her grandchildren dearly and perfected making clothes for them. She enjoyed gifting food and monies to those in need. She was always confident that she could accomplish what she wanted to and did. Charles and Alice enjoyed vacationing in PA spending time with Charles’s family and friends. Alice enjoyed keeping close contact with distant family by writing to her French and American families throughout her adult life. Alice is survived by her 5 children, son Gerard Perichon of New York, NY; daughter Ruth DeMaida and husband Robert of Terryville, CT, son Charles Tishue and wife Maria of Hedgesville, WV, daughter Paulette Bergeron and husband Arthur of Medway, MA, and son Gary Tishue and wife Diane of Northborough, MA; her 9 grandchildren: Scott Brower, Bryan Tishue and wife Judy, Christopher Tishue, Edward (Ted) Bergeron, Christine Bergeron, Adam Bergeron and wife Nicole, John Tishue, Paul Tishue, and Jessica Tishue; and her 3 great grandchildren Brigid, Ryan, and Madison.She was the sister of the late Lucienne (Perichon) Manzione and Marie (Perichon) Montharry, both of France. She lea...

Marjorie Mabel (Riebold) Holt-Roberts - Lewiston Morning Tribune (subscription)

Monday, March 27, 2017

Pearl and uncle Addie Alexander in Kendrick.She married Felix Holt in 1941, and they made their home in Kendrick and Lewiston. They had three children, Shirley (John) McCann of Uniontown, Jack W. Holt, who passed away Nov. 15, 1950, and Nancy Holt of Lewiston. Felix Holt died in 1976, and Marjorie later married Howard Roberts in 1983. Howard added seven children to the marriage.Marjorie enjoyed being a member of the CB Club, as well as the Bowling and Garden Club. She enjoyed fishing, making crafts and especially cake decorating. She enjoyed teaching her grandchildren and great-grandchildren how to play cards, dice and crochet.Marjorie leaves behind eight grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; four sisters; one brother; husbands Felix Holt and Howard Roberts; her son, Jack Holt; and a granddaughter, Kristan Curtiss. Marjorie had a long, healthy life and will be greatly missed.A funeral will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Mountain View Funeral Home in Lewiston. Viewing will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday.#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }...

Michael James Delligatti, Creator of the Big Mac, Dies at 98 - New York Times

Monday, December 19, 2016

By WILLIAM GRIMESNovember 30, 2016In April 1967, hamburger lovers in Uniontown, Pa., south of Pittsburgh, met a newer, bigger burger. Introduced by a local McDonald’s, it was called the Big Mac, and for 45 cents it delivered, as a 1970s jingle would have it, “two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame-seed bun.”Response was positive. A year later, the Big Mac was on the menu at McDonald’s restaurants all over the United States. By 1969, it accounted for 19 percent of the company’s total sales. Today, the company sells about 550 million Big Macs annually in the United States alone, and millions more in 100 countries around the world.Jim Delligatti, the McDonald’s franchise owner who invented the Big Mac, died on Monday at his home in Fox Chapel, Pa. He was 98. The death was confirmed by his son Michael.Mr. Delligatti, who opened the first McDonald’s in western Pennsylvania in 1957, owned about a dozen franchises in the Pittsburgh area by the mid-1960s, but he struggled to compete with the Big Boy and Burger King cha...

Creator Of McDonald's Big Mac Dies At 98 - KNPR

Monday, December 12, 2016

The menu was pretty simple back in those early days — hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes. But Delligatti saw that his customers wanted something bigger, so in 1967 at his restaurant in Uniontown, Pa., he put together two hamburger patties, topped it with cheese, lettuce, onions and pickles, and he developed a special sauce for the burger. He called it the Big Mac.In a 1993 interview with the Associated Press, he said McDonald's initially rejected the burger."I tried for two years to have McDonald's let me try to make this Big Mac and they said no," Delligatti said, adding, "They figured, why go to something else if [the original menu] was working so well?"Support comes fromSo Delligatti made and sold Big Macs in his Pittsburgh-area restaurants, experimenting with the special sauce along the way, until eventually, McDonald's executives came around and began selling the Big Mac nationally. Now, almost 50 years later, the Big Mac is sold in more than 100 countries and has become the most popular sandwich on the planet, according to the fast-food chain.An obituary put out by his family notes that Delligatti was a true innovator in the fast-food industry, instrumental in introducing breakfast at McDonald's, making the hotcakes and sausage meals for hungry millworkers on their way home from overnight shifts in the steel mills.Delligatti co-founded Pittsburgh's Ronald McDonald House and supported many other charities in Western Pennsylvania. He also served in the Army in World War II."Jim was a legendary franchisee within McDonald's system who made a lasting impression on our brand," reads a statement from McDonald's corporate headquarters. "He is an exemplary individual who embraced the community and championed many causes and organizations that benefitted children. We will remember Jim a...

Big Mac creator Jim Delligatti dies at 98 - USA TODAY

Monday, December 12, 2016

Monday at home in Pittsburgh. Delligatti, who according to his son ate at least one 540-calorie Big Mac a week for decades, was 98.Delligatti’s franchise was based in Uniontown, not far from Pittsburgh, when he invented the chain’s signature burger in 1967 after deciding customers wanted a bigger sandwich. Demand exploded as Delligatti’s sandwich spread to the rest of his 47 stores in Pennsylvania and was added to the chain’s national menu in 1968.Today, we celebrate the 98 inspirational years of Big Mac inventor, Michael "Jim" Delligatti. Jim, we thank and will forever remember you. pic.twitter.com/wmEFrmazdn— McDonald's (@McDonalds) November 30, 2016“He was often asked why he named it the Big Mac, and he said because Big Mc sounded too funny,” his son Michael Delligatti said.Jim Delligatti told The Associated Press in 2006 that McDonald’s resisted the idea at first because its simple lineup of hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes was selling well.“They figured, why go to something else if (the original menu) was working so well?” Delligatti said then.McDonald’s has sold billions of Big Macs since then, in more than 100 countries. When the burger turned 40, McDonald’s estimated it was selling 550 million Big Macs a year, or roughly 17 every second. Delligatti received no payment or royalties for coming up with the burger, the company said.“Delligatti was a legendary franchisee within McDonald’s system who made a lasting impression on our brand,” the Oak Brook, Illinois-based company said Wednesday in a statement. The Big Mac “has become an iconic sandwich enjoyed by many around the world.”Ann Dugan, a former assistant dean of the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz School of Business and an expert ...

In Alabama, Jeff Sessions Desegregated Schools and Got the Death Penalty for KKK Murderer - The Weekly Standard (blog)

Monday, November 21, 2016

A detailed story in the Tuscaloosa News reported that voting patterns in one Perry County town were also mighty suspicious in 2012: "Uniontown has a population of 1,775, according to the 2010 census but, according to the Perry County board of registrars, has 2,587 registered voters. The total votes cast thereTuesday—1,431—represented a turnout of 55 percent of the number of registered voters and a whopping 80.6 percent of the town's population."Perhaps there are a lot of ideological reasons for liberals to be upset about Sessions becoming attorney general. But I don't think the character attacks on the man can be taken seriously.Correction: A previous version of this post identified Henry Francis Hays as an Alabama KKK head. He was actually the son of one: Bennie Hays, who, per his obituary, was accused of "instigating" the murder for which Henry Hays was executed. The story has been updated.

Friend recalls torment wife's injury from rock caused man - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, August 22, 2016

The prosecutor in the case, Union County District Attorney Pete Johnson, told Pennlive.com this week that he sees a link between the rock attack and Randy Budd's death inside his home in Uniontown, Ohio."Randy Budd did not die from a gunshot," Johnson said. "He died when those kids threw a rock through his windshield."The young men, who were 17 and 18 years old at the time of the attack, were given minimum sentences of a year to 4½ years behind bars and will be on probation after their release. Messages left for defense lawyers and at the defendants' homes weren't returned Tuesday.Police said the rock throwing was part of a day of troublemaking that included stealing steaks, breaking a neighbor's window and driving through a cornfield.Sharon Budd was a front-seat passenger in an SUV driven by their daughter, on their way to see a show in New York, when the rock crashed through the windshield.At a sentencing last summer, Sharon Budd, who taught language arts at a middle school, said her "heart went out" to the defendants."I think back to when I was 17, I didn't always make the best decisions," she said.Farrow said he never heard Randy Budd criticize the defendants."He truly loved everybody," Farrow said. "He never said anything ill about those kids, never ever, to me. I never met such a positive man. All he wanted was for Sharon to get better."They spoke most recently last week, making plans for Farrow and his husband to visit the Budds this coming weekend. Randy Budd didn't know they were part of a wider surprise family reunion in the works.Randy Budd sent him a text the night before his suicide, telling the couple he loved them — the sort of thing he did all the time."If you ask me why, in my opinion, this happened, I'm going to tell you that Randy lost Sharon when this happened, and when he lost Sharon, he lost his life," Farrow said. "Because Sharon was his life — every single thing — for him."A memorial service for Budd has been scheduled for Friday evening at Paquelet Funeral Home in Massillon, Ohio.

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Uniontown News

Alice Tishue

Saturday, April 08, 2017

She grew up in Vichy and Varrennes-sur-Allier with lots of close family nearby. She left Paris, France after WWII to marry former US Army G.I. Charles W. Tishue on March 25th, 1946 in Uniontown, PA. They met when Charles served under Patton’s 5th Infantry Division in the European Theater where he was decorated with a Bronze Star. Alice was a very caring and serving wife and mother. She loved her grandchildren dearly and perfected making clothes for them. She enjoyed gifting food and monies to those in need. She was always confident that she could accomplish what she wanted to and did. Charles and Alice enjoyed vacationing in PA spending time with Charles’s family and friends. Alice enjoyed keeping close contact with distant family by writing to her French and American families throughout her adult life. Alice is survived by her 5 children, son Gerard Perichon of New York, NY; daughter Ruth DeMaida and husband Robert of Terryville, CT, son Charles Tishue and wife Maria of Hedgesville, WV, daughter Paulette Bergeron and husband Arthur of Medway, MA, and son Gary Tishue and wife Diane of Northborough, MA; her 9 grandchildren: Scott Brower, Bryan Tishue and wife Judy, Christopher Tishue, Edward (Ted) Bergeron, Christine Bergeron, Adam Bergeron and wife Nicole, John Tishue, Paul Tishue, and Jessica Tishue; and her 3 great grandchildren Brigid, Ryan, and Madison.She was the sister of the late Lucienne (Perichon) Manzione and Marie (Perichon) Montharry, both of France. She lea...

Marjorie Mabel (Riebold) Holt-Roberts - Lewiston Morning Tribune (subscription)

Monday, March 27, 2017

Pearl and uncle Addie Alexander in Kendrick.She married Felix Holt in 1941, and they made their home in Kendrick and Lewiston. They had three children, Shirley (John) McCann of Uniontown, Jack W. Holt, who passed away Nov. 15, 1950, and Nancy Holt of Lewiston. Felix Holt died in 1976, and Marjorie later married Howard Roberts in 1983. Howard added seven children to the marriage.Marjorie enjoyed being a member of the CB Club, as well as the Bowling and Garden Club. She enjoyed fishing, making crafts and especially cake decorating. She enjoyed teaching her grandchildren and great-grandchildren how to play cards, dice and crochet.Marjorie leaves behind eight grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; four sisters; one brother; husbands Felix Holt and Howard Roberts; her son, Jack Holt; and a granddaughter, Kristan Curtiss. Marjorie had a long, healthy life and will be greatly missed.A funeral will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Mountain View Funeral Home in Lewiston. Viewing will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday.#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }...

Michael James Delligatti, Creator of the Big Mac, Dies at 98 - New York Times

Monday, December 19, 2016

By WILLIAM GRIMESNovember 30, 2016In April 1967, hamburger lovers in Uniontown, Pa., south of Pittsburgh, met a newer, bigger burger. Introduced by a local McDonald’s, it was called the Big Mac, and for 45 cents it delivered, as a 1970s jingle would have it, “two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame-seed bun.”Response was positive. A year later, the Big Mac was on the menu at McDonald’s restaurants all over the United States. By 1969, it accounted for 19 percent of the company’s total sales. Today, the company sells about 550 million Big Macs annually in the United States alone, and millions more in 100 countries around the world.Jim Delligatti, the McDonald’s franchise owner who invented the Big Mac, died on Monday at his home in Fox Chapel, Pa. He was 98. The death was confirmed by his son Michael.Mr. Delligatti, who opened the first McDonald’s in western Pennsylvania in 1957, owned about a dozen franchises in the Pittsburgh area by the mid-1960s, but he struggled to compete with the Big Boy and Burger King cha...

Creator Of McDonald's Big Mac Dies At 98 - KNPR

Monday, December 12, 2016

The menu was pretty simple back in those early days — hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes. But Delligatti saw that his customers wanted something bigger, so in 1967 at his restaurant in Uniontown, Pa., he put together two hamburger patties, topped it with cheese, lettuce, onions and pickles, and he developed a special sauce for the burger. He called it the Big Mac.In a 1993 interview with the Associated Press, he said McDonald's initially rejected the burger."I tried for two years to have McDonald's let me try to make this Big Mac and they said no," Delligatti said, adding, "They figured, why go to something else if [the original menu] was working so well?"Support comes fromSo Delligatti made and sold Big Macs in his Pittsburgh-area restaurants, experimenting with the special sauce along the way, until eventually, McDonald's executives came around and began selling the Big Mac nationally. Now, almost 50 years later, the Big Mac is sold in more than 100 countries and has become the most popular sandwich on the planet, according to the fast-food chain.An obituary put out by his family notes that Delligatti was a true innovator in the fast-food industry, instrumental in introducing breakfast at McDonald's, making the hotcakes and sausage meals for hungry millworkers on their way home from overnight shifts in the steel mills.Delligatti co-founded Pittsburgh's Ronald McDonald House and supported many other charities in Western Pennsylvania. He also served in the Army in World War II."Jim was a legendary franchisee within McDonald's system who made a lasting impression on our brand," reads a statement from McDonald's corporate headquarters. "He is an exemplary individual who embraced the community and championed many causes and organizations that benefitted children. We will remember Jim a...

Big Mac creator Jim Delligatti dies at 98 - USA TODAY

Monday, December 12, 2016

Monday at home in Pittsburgh. Delligatti, who according to his son ate at least one 540-calorie Big Mac a week for decades, was 98.Delligatti’s franchise was based in Uniontown, not far from Pittsburgh, when he invented the chain’s signature burger in 1967 after deciding customers wanted a bigger sandwich. Demand exploded as Delligatti’s sandwich spread to the rest of his 47 stores in Pennsylvania and was added to the chain’s national menu in 1968.Today, we celebrate the 98 inspirational years of Big Mac inventor, Michael "Jim" Delligatti. Jim, we thank and will forever remember you. pic.twitter.com/wmEFrmazdn— McDonald's (@McDonalds) November 30, 2016“He was often asked why he named it the Big Mac, and he said because Big Mc sounded too funny,” his son Michael Delligatti said.Jim Delligatti told The Associated Press in 2006 that McDonald’s resisted the idea at first because its simple lineup of hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes was selling well.“They figured, why go to something else if (the original menu) was working so well?” Delligatti said then.McDonald’s has sold billions of Big Macs since then, in more than 100 countries. When the burger turned 40, McDonald’s estimated it was selling 550 million Big Macs a year, or roughly 17 every second. Delligatti received no payment or royalties for coming up with the burger, the company said.“Delligatti was a legendary franchisee within McDonald’s system who made a lasting impression on our brand,” the Oak Brook, Illinois-based company said Wednesday in a statement. The Big Mac “has become an iconic sandwich enjoyed by many around the world.”Ann Dugan, a former assistant dean of the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz School of Business and an expert ...

In Alabama, Jeff Sessions Desegregated Schools and Got the Death Penalty for KKK Murderer - The Weekly Standard (blog)

Monday, November 21, 2016

A detailed story in the Tuscaloosa News reported that voting patterns in one Perry County town were also mighty suspicious in 2012: "Uniontown has a population of 1,775, according to the 2010 census but, according to the Perry County board of registrars, has 2,587 registered voters. The total votes cast thereTuesday—1,431—represented a turnout of 55 percent of the number of registered voters and a whopping 80.6 percent of the town's population."Perhaps there are a lot of ideological reasons for liberals to be upset about Sessions becoming attorney general. But I don't think the character attacks on the man can be taken seriously.Correction: A previous version of this post identified Henry Francis Hays as an Alabama KKK head. He was actually the son of one: Bennie Hays, who, per his obituary, was accused of "instigating" the murder for which Henry Hays was executed. The story has been updated.

Friend recalls torment wife's injury from rock caused man - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, August 22, 2016

The prosecutor in the case, Union County District Attorney Pete Johnson, told Pennlive.com this week that he sees a link between the rock attack and Randy Budd's death inside his home in Uniontown, Ohio."Randy Budd did not die from a gunshot," Johnson said. "He died when those kids threw a rock through his windshield."The young men, who were 17 and 18 years old at the time of the attack, were given minimum sentences of a year to 4½ years behind bars and will be on probation after their release. Messages left for defense lawyers and at the defendants' homes weren't returned Tuesday.Police said the rock throwing was part of a day of troublemaking that included stealing steaks, breaking a neighbor's window and driving through a cornfield.Sharon Budd was a front-seat passenger in an SUV driven by their daughter, on their way to see a show in New York, when the rock crashed through the windshield.At a sentencing last summer, Sharon Budd, who taught language arts at a middle school, said her "heart went out" to the defendants."I think back to when I was 17, I didn't always make the best decisions," she said.Farrow said he never heard Randy Budd criticize the defendants."He truly loved everybody," Farrow said. "He never said anything ill about those kids, never ever, to me. I never met such a positive man. All he wanted was for Sharon to get better."They spoke most recently last week, making plans for Farrow and his husband to visit the Budds this coming weekend. Randy Budd didn't know they were part of a wider surprise family reunion in the works.Randy Budd sent him a text the night before his suicide, telling the couple he loved them — the sort of thing he did all the time."If you ask me why, in my opinion, this happened, I'm going to tell you that Randy lost Sharon when this happened, and when he lost Sharon, he lost his life," Farrow said. "Because Sharon was his life — every single thing — for him."A memorial service for Budd has been scheduled for Friday evening at Paquelet Funeral Home in Massillon, Ohio.