Gilbert AZ Funeral Homes

Gilbert AZ funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about APM Income Tax Service , Williams Medical Waste by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Gilbert funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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APM Income Tax Service

2166 South Porter Street
Gilbert, AZ 85295
(480) 899-8855
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Falconer Funeral Home

251 West Juniper Avenue
Gilbert, AZ 85233
(480) 892-9411
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Williams Medical Waste

2166 South Porter Street
Gilbert, AZ 85295
(480) 899-8855
Williams Medical Waste funeral flowers

Gilbert AZ Obituaries and Death Notices

Al Sorrell, 1923-2017 - Columbia Daily Tribune

Monday, June 19, 2017

Sorrell; and many great grandchildren.In addition to his parents, step-mother Bertie Sorrell, and his first wife Donna, he was also preceded in death by an infant son, Larry Sorrell; two brothers, Gilbert Sorrell and Terry Sorrell; one son-in-law, Randy Hendrickson.Memorial contributions are suggested to Crossroads Cemetery in care of the funeral chapel.

June 9, 2017 - WJHnews

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Newport News, Va. She was a member of Providence Methodist Church in Amory, Va.She was the daughter of the late Addison and Jewel Doris Thomas Moore. She was also preceded in death by her husband, Gilbert John Sealey Sr., and her daughter, Dianne Keener.Surviving are three grandchildren, Carl (Ute) Massey, of Brunswick, Frederick (Susie) Massey, of Blackshear, and Samuel Head, of Atkinson; six great-grandchildren, Amber Nicole Massey, Brandon Purdom, Bryan Purdom, Abbie Head, Ashley (Michael) Barry, and Joe (Destiny) Prince; two great-great-grandchildren, Elizabeth Prince and Evelyn Barry; her son-in-law, Roger Keener, of Blackshear; a special friend, David E. Long, of Blackshear; and several other relatives and friends.A graveside service will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Providence Methodist Church Cemetery in Grafton, Va.There will be no visitation.Sympathy may be expressed by signing the online register at www.pearsondial.comPearson-Dial Funeral Home, Inc., of Blackshear, is in charge of the arrangements.

James Clayton Eugene Hovre - La Crosse Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 2017

ETTRICK -- James Clayton Eugene Hovre, 88, of Ettrick died Wednesday, June 7, 2017, in his home.James was born June 29, 1928, in rural Ettrick to Eddie and Celia (Hoff) Hovre. He married Milda Gilbertson Nov. 13, 1954, in Winona, Minn. Milda preceded Jim in death June 23, 1968. James later married Vicki Hestekind June 24, 1989, in the French Creek Lutheran Church in rural Ettrick.After graduation from Galesville High School in 1947, he was a dairy farmer in the French Creek area finally settling in Iduna, where he raised Registered Holstein cattle. He was quite proud of his cattle and the family was very active in showing Registered Holsteins, Duroc hogs and beef cattle.He continued dairy farming until 1992, at which time he retired to his next life chapter, raising and breeding Norwegian Fjord horses, developing blood lines from Norway which are known across the U.S.James was active at various times in the French Creek Lutheran Church Council, Farm Bureau Board, Registered Holstein Association, Sons of Norway Fagernes Lodge 616, Soil and Water Conservation Stream Bank Improvement and the Norwegian Fjord Horse Association. Bowling and curling were outside activities he enjoy...

Anna Ryan - Cuero Record

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Doris Boldt of Yorktown; brother, Al (Myrlin) of Yorktown; and many nieces and nephews.She is preceded in death by parents; husband; son, Richard III; sisters, Olga and Beth; brothers, Ed, Vic and Gilbert; and two infant sisters.Visitation will be Monday, April 17 at Freund Funeral Home from 5 to 7 p.m. with a rosary beginning at 6:30. Services will be Tuesday, April 18, at 10 a.m., at St. Michael’s Catholic Church with Father David Berger officiating. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery.Pallbearers are Bill Boldt, Charles Blank, Raymond Jasso, Richard Carbonara, Scott Polkuda and William Potcinske.The family would like to thank Hospice of South Texas and caregivers, Julia Ruiz and Jessica Boyd, for your compassion and care.Memorial contributions may be made to St. Michael’s School, St. Michael’s Catholic Church, or Hospice of South Texas.You may sign the guest book or send condolences at www.freundfuneralhome.com.Freund Funeral Home, 361-275-2343.

Lolis Elie, Lawyer Who Helped Desegregate New Orleans, Dies at 87 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

His birth certificate says Feb. 9, 1928, but the family believes it is incorrect.)His father, Theophile, was a truck driver who did not encourage his son to continue his education beyond the Gilbert Academy, a Methodist high school. His mother, the former Mary Elizabeth Villere, worked part time as a maid.Mr. Elie spent six months as a merchant seaman before landing in New York, where he shined shoes and delivered stationery by subway. He was drafted and inducted into the Army in mid-1951 (the Army had been desegregated in 1948). He was trained as a clerk-typist and befriended by an Italian-American soldier who had also felt the sting of discrimination and who urged Mr. Elie to one day get a law degree, as he had.“The desegregation of the armed services is possibly one of the most significant things that has happened in this country,” Mr. Elie told Robert Penn Warren in “Who Speaks for the Negro?” (1965).He enrolled in Howard University on the G.I. Bill before transferring to Dillard University in New Orleans, from which he graduated. He went on to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans shortly after the school had been desegregated.His marriage to the former Gerri Moore, a school principal and university professor, ended in divorce. In addition to their son, who was a columnist for The Times-Picayune of New Orleans and story editor for the HBO drama “Treme,” he is survived by their daughter, Dr. Migel Elizabeth Elie; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.With his two black law partners, Nils R. Douglas and Robert F. Collins, Mr. Elie represented the Consumers’ League of Greater New Orleans in its 1960 boycott of white store owners on a strip of what is now Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard.After enlisting a criminal defense lawyer, John P. Nelson Jr., who was white, the legal team successfully argued for charges to be dropped against members of the Congress of Racial Equality — Oretha Castle was one — who had engaged in lunch-counter protests in a case that was ultimately decided by the United States Supreme Court. (Mr. Nelson carried the appeal to the Supreme Court.)Mr. Elie helped negotiate desegregation agreements with merchants and successfully defended Ernest N. Morial, known as Dutch, against a challenge to his residency when he sought to become the first black member of the State House of Representatives.But Mr. Elie also became frustrated with the pace of equal opportunity, at one time embracing black nationalism and Malcolm X.Mr. Elie, who retired shortly after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, was reflective about what more than four decades of advocacy for civil rights had accomplished.“I think what it effectively did was create a middle class,” he told WWL-TV in 1997. “For example, in 1959 when I finished law school, there were about 10 African-American lawyers in the city of New Orleans and probably 30 in the state. There are hundreds now, hundreds of doctors.“On the other hand, you have more people in prison now than ever. You have more African-American males in prison than you have in college, so it’s better for some, much worse for others.”...

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Al Sorrell, 1923-2017 - Columbia Daily Tribune

Monday, June 19, 2017

Sorrell; and many great grandchildren.In addition to his parents, step-mother Bertie Sorrell, and his first wife Donna, he was also preceded in death by an infant son, Larry Sorrell; two brothers, Gilbert Sorrell and Terry Sorrell; one son-in-law, Randy Hendrickson.Memorial contributions are suggested to Crossroads Cemetery in care of the funeral chapel.

June 9, 2017 - WJHnews

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Newport News, Va. She was a member of Providence Methodist Church in Amory, Va.She was the daughter of the late Addison and Jewel Doris Thomas Moore. She was also preceded in death by her husband, Gilbert John Sealey Sr., and her daughter, Dianne Keener.Surviving are three grandchildren, Carl (Ute) Massey, of Brunswick, Frederick (Susie) Massey, of Blackshear, and Samuel Head, of Atkinson; six great-grandchildren, Amber Nicole Massey, Brandon Purdom, Bryan Purdom, Abbie Head, Ashley (Michael) Barry, and Joe (Destiny) Prince; two great-great-grandchildren, Elizabeth Prince and Evelyn Barry; her son-in-law, Roger Keener, of Blackshear; a special friend, David E. Long, of Blackshear; and several other relatives and friends.A graveside service will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Providence Methodist Church Cemetery in Grafton, Va.There will be no visitation.Sympathy may be expressed by signing the online register at www.pearsondial.comPearson-Dial Funeral Home, Inc., of Blackshear, is in charge of the arrangements.

James Clayton Eugene Hovre - La Crosse Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 2017

ETTRICK -- James Clayton Eugene Hovre, 88, of Ettrick died Wednesday, June 7, 2017, in his home.James was born June 29, 1928, in rural Ettrick to Eddie and Celia (Hoff) Hovre. He married Milda Gilbertson Nov. 13, 1954, in Winona, Minn. Milda preceded Jim in death June 23, 1968. James later married Vicki Hestekind June 24, 1989, in the French Creek Lutheran Church in rural Ettrick.After graduation from Galesville High School in 1947, he was a dairy farmer in the French Creek area finally settling in Iduna, where he raised Registered Holstein cattle. He was quite proud of his cattle and the family was very active in showing Registered Holsteins, Duroc hogs and beef cattle.He continued dairy farming until 1992, at which time he retired to his next life chapter, raising and breeding Norwegian Fjord horses, developing blood lines from Norway which are known across the U.S.James was active at various times in the French Creek Lutheran Church Council, Farm Bureau Board, Registered Holstein Association, Sons of Norway Fagernes Lodge 616, Soil and Water Conservation Stream Bank Improvement and the Norwegian Fjord Horse Association. Bowling and curling were outside activities he enjoy...

Anna Ryan - Cuero Record

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Doris Boldt of Yorktown; brother, Al (Myrlin) of Yorktown; and many nieces and nephews.She is preceded in death by parents; husband; son, Richard III; sisters, Olga and Beth; brothers, Ed, Vic and Gilbert; and two infant sisters.Visitation will be Monday, April 17 at Freund Funeral Home from 5 to 7 p.m. with a rosary beginning at 6:30. Services will be Tuesday, April 18, at 10 a.m., at St. Michael’s Catholic Church with Father David Berger officiating. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery.Pallbearers are Bill Boldt, Charles Blank, Raymond Jasso, Richard Carbonara, Scott Polkuda and William Potcinske.The family would like to thank Hospice of South Texas and caregivers, Julia Ruiz and Jessica Boyd, for your compassion and care.Memorial contributions may be made to St. Michael’s School, St. Michael’s Catholic Church, or Hospice of South Texas.You may sign the guest book or send condolences at www.freundfuneralhome.com.Freund Funeral Home, 361-275-2343.

Lolis Elie, Lawyer Who Helped Desegregate New Orleans, Dies at 87 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

His birth certificate says Feb. 9, 1928, but the family believes it is incorrect.)His father, Theophile, was a truck driver who did not encourage his son to continue his education beyond the Gilbert Academy, a Methodist high school. His mother, the former Mary Elizabeth Villere, worked part time as a maid.Mr. Elie spent six months as a merchant seaman before landing in New York, where he shined shoes and delivered stationery by subway. He was drafted and inducted into the Army in mid-1951 (the Army had been desegregated in 1948). He was trained as a clerk-typist and befriended by an Italian-American soldier who had also felt the sting of discrimination and who urged Mr. Elie to one day get a law degree, as he had.“The desegregation of the armed services is possibly one of the most significant things that has happened in this country,” Mr. Elie told Robert Penn Warren in “Who Speaks for the Negro?” (1965).He enrolled in Howard University on the G.I. Bill before transferring to Dillard University in New Orleans, from which he graduated. He went on to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans shortly after the school had been desegregated.His marriage to the former Gerri Moore, a school principal and university professor, ended in divorce. In addition to their son, who was a columnist for The Times-Picayune of New Orleans and story editor for the HBO drama “Treme,” he is survived by their daughter, Dr. Migel Elizabeth Elie; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.With his two black law partners, Nils R. Douglas and Robert F. Collins, Mr. Elie represented the Consumers’ League of Greater New Orleans in its 1960 boycott of white store owners on a strip of what is now Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard.After enlisting a criminal defense lawyer, John P. Nelson Jr., who was white, the legal team successfully argued for charges to be dropped against members of the Congress of Racial Equality — Oretha Castle was one — who had engaged in lunch-counter protests in a case that was ultimately decided by the United States Supreme Court. (Mr. Nelson carried the appeal to the Supreme Court.)Mr. Elie helped negotiate desegregation agreements with merchants and successfully defended Ernest N. Morial, known as Dutch, against a challenge to his residency when he sought to become the first black member of the State House of Representatives.But Mr. Elie also became frustrated with the pace of equal opportunity, at one time embracing black nationalism and Malcolm X.Mr. Elie, who retired shortly after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, was reflective about what more than four decades of advocacy for civil rights had accomplished.“I think what it effectively did was create a middle class,” he told WWL-TV in 1997. “For example, in 1959 when I finished law school, there were about 10 African-American lawyers in the city of New Orleans and probably 30 in the state. There are hundreds now, hundreds of doctors.“On the other hand, you have more people in prison now than ever. You have more African-American males in prison than you have in college, so it’s better for some, much worse for others.”...