Dermott AR Funeral Homes

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Church Burial Association

200 North Norwood Street
Dermott, AR 71638
(870) 538-3229
Church Burial Association funeral flowers

Davis Funeral Home

200 North Norwood Street
Dermott, AR 71638
(870) 538-3229
Davis Funeral Home funeral flowers

Dillard Funeral Home

210 North Trotter Street
Dermott, AR 71638
(870) 538-5505
Dillard Funeral Home funeral flowers

Griffin Funeral Service

110 North Freeman Street
Dermott, AR 71638
(870) 538-5343
Griffin Funeral Service funeral flowers

Strickland M Davis Funeral Home

605 North Main Street
Dermott, AR 71638
(870) 538-9091
Strickland M Davis Funeral Home funeral flowers

Dermott AR Obituaries and Death Notices

Robert J. Roush - Timesonline.com

Monday, June 19, 2017

Thursday, May 25, 2017.Born July 14, 1968, in New Brighton, he was the son of Kathie Ann Fleeson Roush and the late Eugene L. Roush. He had formerly been employed as a welder at McDermott Steel Company and also PTC Alliance. He was a musician, enjoyed playing pool, golfing, and fishing with his son, Jeremy.In addition to his mother, Kathie Roush, an employee of the College Hill Pharmacy, he is also survived by two brothers and a sister-in-law, David and Jackie Roush, London, England; Jeffrey Roush, Beaver Falls; his son, Jeremy Roush, Louisville, Ky.; stepson, Shawn Rush; three nieces and a nephew, Britteny and Emma Roush, London; Stephanie and Matt Cornelius, Beaver Falls; two aunts, Darlene George and Sue Lansberry; his former wife, Cheryl Barnes Roush, and several cousins. He will be sadly missed by his numerous friends, especially Jim and Doug Dougherty and Scott Milnes.Friends will be received Monday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. in HILL & KUNSELMAN FUNERAL HOME, www.hillandkunselman.com, 3801 Fourth Ave., College Hill, Beaver Falls. There will be a memorial service on Tuesday at 11 a.m. in the College Hill United Methodist Church, 33rd St. and 5th Ave., with Rev. Darryl Lockie officiating.

Christine Wallace

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Her husband of 52 years, Edwin W. Wallace died in 2010. She leaves her loving children, James Wallace and his wife Joanne of Auburn, Maryellen Hussey and her husband Michael of Auburn, Christine McDermott and her partner Chris LeBlanc of Marlborough and Patrick Wallace and his wife Susan of Northbridge; ten grandchildren, Sean, Ryan, Timothy, Patrick, Steven, Courtney, Catherine, Maura, Ashlee and Justin; two sisters, Gay Gillon and Norma Beland; a brother, William “Billy” Brunelle; and her best friend, Joe DiCarlo; Also survived by many nieces, nephews and friends. She was predeceased by four sisters, Barbara, Alice, Rhonda and Sylvia and three brothers, Gerald “Denny”, Frederick “Teddy” and Clarence “Ed” Brunelle.Relatives and friends are invited to visit with Christine’s family on Monday, April 10 2017 from 9:00-11:00 am in the BRITTON-WALLACE FUNERAL HOME, 91 Central St, Auburn. Her funeral Mass will follow and be celebrated at 11:30 am in North American Martyr’s Church, 8 Wyoma Drive, Auburn. Burial will be private at a later date. Memorial donations may be made to, AHS Rocket Booster Club, 99 Auburn Street Auburn, Ma 01501.

Pulitzer Prize winner, former PI reporter Andrew Schneider dies at 74 - The Seattle Times

Monday, February 27, 2017

I’ve worked on asbestos and other public-health issues, I’ve worked with a lot of journalists,” said public-health scientist Barry Castleman. “Andy Schneider was by far the best.”Keven McDermott, retired manager of field investigations for EPA Region 10, worked with him on several stories. She called him, “our hero, our friend, our inspiration. He encouraged us to be brave and do good work. He told the stories that needed to be told and saved lives in the process. He will be forever missed.”Mr. Schneider’s skill at befriending news sources led him to access to information journalists seldom get today. Staff at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh got so used to seeing him that they gave him a lab coat and a “Dr. Schneider” name tag.Kimberly Hartnett worked with him in Concord, New Hampshire, covering anti-nuclear protests at Seabrook, New Hampshire, in the 1970s. “With stories like that it’s easy to cover from the sidelines, talk to two protesters and one police official and file. Andy didn’t believe (in) that,” she said. “For him there was never an end to the reporting.”He was generous to a fault, Hartnett recalled. “You had to be careful, going to his house,” she said. “If you said, ‘that’s a nice chair,’ he would soon be sending you that chair or one just like it.”Andrew Jay Schneider was born Nov. 13, 1942, in the Bronx, New York. He spent much of his childhood in Miami. His father Jack was a chef and maître d’hôtel at the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach and his mother Fran was a waitress there — a background that helped produce Mr. Schneider’s formidable culinary skills.While working in Washington, D.C., he was known for throwing dinner parties on the spur of the moment. He hosted Thanksgiving for those with no local family.“The food was spectacular and all of us crowded around to watch him cook on a restaurant-sized stove, ”said Joann Byrd, then The Washington Post ombudsman.Byrd, who was editorial-page editor at the P-I during Mr. Schneider’s tenure there, said, “He was always on the side of people who were suffering or being treated badly.”His son, Patrick Schneider, is a photographer in Charlotte, North Carolina. “My dad made me the photojournalist, father and man that I am today. He taught me to always push to be my best.”He remembered, as a boy, becoming obsessed with photojournalism. He would sleep with a police scanner in his room, then wake his father for a ride to the scene of a crime or accident to shoot it. “I think the best day of his life was when I got my driver’s license and he could get a good night’s sleep,” Patrick Schneider said.Many colleagues remember him cooking meals for small groups or entire newsrooms. Wherever Mr. Schneider went in his career, a remodeled kitchen and great food would surely follow.“Andy was a force of nature,” said investigative reporter Bill Lambrecht. “He was the fiercest antagonist, the truest advocate, the most loyal friend, the most generous host and cook. He would hear none of it when someone in his business bemoaned having little good to write about.“He would say, ‘So many stories, so little time.’?”Besides wife Kathy and son Patrick, Mr. Schneider is survived by daughter Kelly Schneider of Seattle; first wife Carol Schneider of Charlotte; and two gran

William Aubrey Glenn - The Killeen Daily Herald

Monday, February 20, 2017

July 7, 1922, in Lampasas.He was a devoted husband for 61 years to the late Verdie Glenn.Survivors include his daughters, Rachel Glenn of Willis, Sue Hood and her husband, Johnny, of Willis, Mary McDermott and her husband, Ricky, of Spring, and Janet Davis and her husband, Bill, of Comfort; six grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews; and many dear friends.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be directed to the children’s ministry at Grace Family Fellowship.Visitation is from 6 to 8 p.m. today at Grace Family Fellowship Church in Willis.Sam Houston Memorial Funeral Home in Willis is in charge of arrangements. Offer condolences at www.shmfh.com.

Pulitzer Prize winner, former P-I reporter Andrew Schneider dies at ... - The Seattle Times

Monday, February 20, 2017

I’ve worked on asbestos and other public-health issues, I’ve worked with a lot of journalists,” said public-health scientist Barry Castleman. “Andy Schneider was by far the best.”Keven McDermott, retired manager of field investigations for EPA Region 10, worked with him on several stories. She called him, “our hero, our friend, our inspiration. He encouraged us to be brave and do good work. He told the stories that needed to be told and saved lives in the process. He will be forever missed.”Mr. Schneider’s skill at befriending news sources led him to access to information journalists seldom get today. Staff at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh got so used to seeing him that they gave him a lab coat and a “Dr. Schneider” name tag.Kimberly Hartnett worked with him in Concord, New Hampshire, covering anti-nuclear protests at Seabrook, New Hampshire, in the 1970s. “With stories like that it’s easy to cover from the sidelines, talk to two protesters and one police official and file. Andy didn’t believe (in) that,” she said. “For him there was never an end to the reporting.”He was generous to a fault, Hartnett recalled. “You had to be careful, going to his house,” she said. “If you said, ‘that’s a nice chair,’ he would soon be sending you that chair or one just like it.”Andrew Jay Schneider was born Nov. 13, 1942, in the Bronx, New York. He spent much of his childhood in Miami. His father Jack was a chef and maître d’hôtel at the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach and his mother Fran was a waitress there — a background that helped produce Mr. Schneider’s formidable culinary skills.While working in Washington, D.C., he was known for throwing dinner parties on the spur of the moment. He hosted Thanksgiving for those with no local family.“The food was spectacular and all of us crowded around to watch him cook on a restaurant-sized stove, ”said Joann Byrd, then The Washington Post ombudsman.Byrd, who was editorial-page editor at the P-I during Mr. Schneider’s tenure there, said, “He was always on the side of people who were suffering or being treated badly.”His son, Patrick Schneider, is a photographer in Charlotte, North Carolina. “My dad made me the photojournalist, father and man that I am today. He taught me to always push to be my best.”He remembered, as a boy, becoming obsessed with photojournalism. He would sleep with a police scanner in his room, then wake his father for a ride to the scene of a crime or accident to shoot it. “I think the best day of his life was when I got my driver’s license and he could get a good night’s sleep,” Patrick Schneider said.Many colleagues remember him cooking meals for small groups or entire newsrooms. Wherever Mr. Schneider went in his career, a remodeled kitchen and great food would surely follow.“Andy was a force of nature,” said investigative reporter Bill Lambrecht. “He was the fiercest antagonist, the truest advocate, the most loyal friend, the most generous host and cook. He would hear none of it when someone in his business bemoaned having little good to write about.“He would say, ‘So many stories, so little time.’?”Besides wife Kathy and son Patrick, Mr. Schneider is survived by daughter Kelly Schneider of Seattle; first wife Carol Schneider of Charlotte; and

Catherine L. 'Kitty' Dermott - Gloversville Leader-Herald

Monday, December 12, 2016

Catherine L. “Kitty” Dermott, age 90, of Rockwood, passed away on Saturday, December 3, 2016 at the Nathan Littauer Hospital Nursing Home.She was born on November 6, 1926 in Rockwood, a daughter of the late James and Myrtle Stahl Peebles.She was a graduate of Johnstown High School and Nursing School receiving her RN Degree.Mrs. Dermott was a nurse until she started caring for the elderly from her home for 23 years until her retirement.Kitty taught Sunday school for several years.Catherine enjoyed cooking, sewing, crocheting, quilting and visiting with the sick, and she was known for her thoughtfulness and giving, she was given the council for ageing award by former Governor Mario Cuomo.On April 13, 1945, she was united in marriage to Lamont H. “Mickey” Dermott and he passed away on November 14, 2010.Survivors include her son Timothy (Nancy) Dermott of Arizona; five daughters Carol (Charles) Williams of Gloversville, Linda King and her companion Larry Haas of Clifton Park, Mary Scheirer of Rockledge, Florid

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Bankruptcy watch - Arkansas Democrat-Gazette - Arkansas Online

Monday, December 12, 2016

Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 7.CROSSETT Bestre Foster Jr., 112 Dogwood Drive, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.Carl Ray and Leah Gaye Johnson (aka Leah J. Johnson), 3600 Arkansas 133 South, Dec. 6, 2016, Chapter 13.DERMOTT James Arness Jackson (dba Christian Brothers Funeral Home), 420 North Deer St., Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.Rose B. and Nathaniel Perry Sr., 916 North School St., Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.DES ARC Sammuel J. and Demi L. Buckner, 8908 Arkansas 11 North, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 7.EL DORADO Desmond Demontra Warren, 305 Wildwood Drive, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.Phillip Howard and Nicole Robin Patterson, 1308 W. Eighth, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.Sammie Jean Moore, 1921 N. Roselawn Ave., Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 13.FAYETTEVILLE Jason Wayne Terry, 4136 N. Hungate Lane, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 13.Nathan and Carrie Nichols, 2463 Riverwater Lane, Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 13.Rhonda Schmidt, 3067 E. Setter St., Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 7.Sharon Rose Jones and Richard Wayne Wagnon (aka Wayne Wagnon), 2432 Harris Comm. Road, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.FORT SMITH Bobby G. Shepard Jr., 5809 Fresno Terrace, Dec. 6, 2016, Chapter 13.Cody R. Gray, 1201 N. C St., Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.Timothy Armand and Nina Lynn Miller, 3109 N. L St., Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 7.Veronica Vargas, 509 Chateau Drive, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.GLENWOOD Darrell Daniel Wallace, 723 S. Sixth St., Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.GREEN FOREST Ana Paula Guevara, P.O. Box 493, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 7.GREENBRIER Nancy Jo Purifoy, 8 Turquoise Cove, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 7.Sharon Kaye and James Cecil Rodden III, 11 Needs Creek Drive, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.HAMBURG James A. and Crystal L. Davidson (aka Crystal Kinnaird, Crystal Pippen), 161 County Road 88, Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 13.HELENA-WEST HELENA Amy R. Gregory, P.O. Box 2861, Dec. 6, 2016, Chapter 13.Jennifer Sidney, 228 S. Tenth, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 7.Monroe J. Winston, 220 Cherrydale, Dec. 6, 2016, Chapter 7.HENSLEY David Alan and Courtney Lynn Roberts, 347 Nabholtz Road, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 13.HOPE James and Siegrun Witcher, 114 County Road 226, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 7.HOT SPRINGS Raquel Carolina Pina (aka Raquel Carolina Tovias), 256 Candleberry Circle, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 7.Vanessa Elaine Huell (aka Vanessa Finley), 160 Morphew Road Apt. D6, Dec. 6, 2016, Chapter 7.HUMPHREY Steven Bobo, 301 Arkansas 152, Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 7.JACKSONVILLE Alvin Richard and Carol Leanne Halford, 7614 Batesville Pike, Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 7.Andrew S. Harris, 208 Natalie Lane, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 7.Clayton V. and Christina F. Sample, 3 Tallyho Court, Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 7.Deshauna M. Flennoy (aka Deshauna M. Stell), 119 Wilson St., Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.James Robert Walker, 6822 Sunshine Lane, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 13.Sharon Worthen (aka Sharon McCuller), 1500 Sheridan, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 13.JONESBORO Corey Austin, 1803 Leigh Cove, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 7.Latonya Austin, 1803 Leigh Cove, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 7.Shirley Ann Millsap, 2206 Quail Ridge, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.JUDSONIA Jeremy F. Fortner, 614 Jackson St., Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 13.LEACHVILLE Garcia Dean Casey, 6698 N. Arkansas 119, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 7.LEXA Fredreca L. Johnson, 324 Phillips Road, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.LITTLE ROCK Amy R. Hastings, 1124 Pine Valley Drive, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 7.Ashley Anderson, 1912 Green Mountain Drive Apt. 301F, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.Brandy Baker, 9805 Southwest Drive, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 13.Candice Bryant, 15000 Chenal Pkwy Apt. C-304, Dec. 5, 2016, Chapter 13.Cassandra R. Goodwin, 6206 Denham Drive, Dec. 7, 2016, Chapter 7.Christopher R. and Elizabeth A. Bradshaw (aka Chris Bradshaw, Elizabeth George), 3206 Walker St., Dec. 1, 2016, Chapter 13.Eliasa and Denise Love (aka Denise Dean), 9407 Southwest Drive, Dec. 2, 2016, Chapter 13.Eric F. and Kimb

Glenda Jo McEntyre Page - Northwest Georgia News

Monday, August 29, 2016

Bobby Carle Page in May 2, 2006, a brother, Terry Denver McIntyre.Survivors include her children, Jeffery (Donna) Page, Ooletawah, TN; Carl (Raynell Morris) Page, Rome; Melanie McDermott, Cartersville; sister, Nell (Larry) Baker, Douglasville; grandchildren, Matthew (Ashleigh) Page, Kathleen(Tyler) Lane, Thomas Pulliam, and David Pulliam, great grandchildren, Braden Page, Annabelle Page, Isaac Page, and Maggie Lane, several nieces and nephews also survive.Funeral services will be held at 2:00 P.M. Tuesday August 30, 2016 at Good Shepherd Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow in Morning View Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 12:00 P.M. until the hour of the service on Tuesday, at Good Shepherd Funeral Home, 2750 Shorter Ave. Rome, Ga. 30165.Please visit our website, www.goodshepherdfh.net to sign the online guest book and view the DVD on the life of Mrs. Page.Parnick Jennings, Sr.’s Good Shepherd Funeral Home has charge of arrangements.

Area Golf Leagues - Youngstown Vindicator

Monday, August 15, 2016

Catullo Meats (Tom Kos, Rick Banna, Jim Miller, Doc Kennedy, Polinsky, Mike Murphy, Frank Zarlenda.Immaculate Heart — Low gross: Frank Kowalczyk 34; Dave Horner 37; Alex Hoffman, Jason Lenzi, Bill McDermott 40. Low net: Ronnie Williams 29; Jerry Baluck, Nick Barbush, Joe Woodall 31; Bill Basista, Denny Philips, Bob Richardson 32; Pat Castronova, Rick Honaker, Jim Kinnick, George Podolsky, John Ranalli 33; Tom Bobby, Scott Cleckner, Mike Cook, Dave Courtney, Jason Courtney, Matt Hlebak, Todd Pocatko, Brian Remias, Tim Remias, Frank Schubert, JR Scrip 34.Lady Swingers — Play of day (best on middle three holes) winner: Diane Soles 10. Low gross: Marie Hauch 37. Birdie: Hauch. Chip-in: Mary Helen Wilson.St. Christine — Low gross: Joe Bellino, Bob Leonard 37; John Hazy, Mark Delisio, Vic Daprile Jr. 38; Pat Cannon 39. Low net — Bob Trucksis, John Koranicki, Brian Carnie 31; Greg Lovaglio Sr. 32; Joe Turanica Jr., Mike Terlecki, Frank Petretich, Doug Collins 33.Tuesday Ladies Team League — Low Gross: Terry Slovkovsky 50, Patty Mika 55, Madelyn Sell 60. Low Net: Terry Slovkovskt 41, Michelle Day 32, Madelyn Sell 33. Playy of the Day: Margie Waldern 26, Pat Schnell, Michelle Day, Janet Erdel 24, Madelyn Sell 19. Chip-Ins, Michelle Day, Pat Carney, Patty Mika. Birdies: Michelle Day.Thursday Nine Ladies League — Low Gross: Kathy Murdock 48, Carol Crowther 54, Gail Maverman 57. Low Net: Kathy Murdock, Marilyn Africa 35, Carol Crowther 36, Gail Maverman 32. Least Putts: Marilyn Africa 14, Carolyn Semivan, Patti Mika, Gail Maverman, Madelyn Sell, Ann Klien 19. Play of the Day: Joy Batley, Terry Slovkovsky, Gail Maverman, Pat Carney 19, Patti Mika 20. Chip-Ins: Chris Williams. Birdies: Marilyn Africa, Kathy Murdock.Mill Creek Seniors (8-10) — Jim Fossesca 37, Rick Haldi 39, Jack Banks, Joe Matasek, Bill Mills, John Watkins 40. Low Net: Rick Haldi, Bruce Neff 30, Jim Fossesca, Mal Mastell, Mike Yareb 31, Gary DiPillo, Regis Noe, John Par

Saying farewell - Arkansas Online

Monday, June 06, 2016

Naron said that at one time the temple had more than 100 families, with people from McGehee, Dermott and Dumas coming together for worship."We were in all kinds of businesses and civic minded, but everything has changed," she said. "All these small towns have changed, not just the Jewish population."Financially, she said, they can't go on."There comes a time when you have to close, and we've definitely reached it," she said. "I hate to see it close, but it's reached that point."Rabbi Eugene Levy has been serving both congregations in recent years, leading services once a month in Pine Bluff and every other month in McGehee. He'll also lead closing services for both congregations. Former members, friends and student rabbis who served the congregations have been invited, and both congregations are expecting 75-100 as they say goodbye to their longtime spiritual homes."It's kind of like coming back for a funeral," Levy said. "In a way that's what they are coming back for."Levy said the congregation in McGehee has been planning for the end for more than 20 years. They wrote up a will of sorts years ago to dictate what would happen to the temple and the religious items owned by the congregation."It's probably the third or fourth time they've said, 'We've breathed our last,'" he said.This time it's final.The Pine Bluff congregation came to the same conclusion. Levy said Temple Anshe Emeth always had more families and last year they thought they might have a couple of years left."But they realized it was time," he said.Rubenstein said it's sad to close the temple "but, when the time comes, you know the time is here and you have to go with it."Levy, who served as rabbi at Temple B'nai Israel in Little Rock for 24 years, came to the capital city in 1987. One of the first things he did after the High Holidays that year was visit the rabbi at Temple Anshe Emeth. When he walked into the rabbi's office he was emptying his bookshelves, and Levy said it was obvious that he was moving out."They no longer had a Sunday School or a confirmation class, so there was no growth coming," Levy said.The congregation continued to decline."Many of these congregations were founded by landowners and they bought property, stores, factories. They were the ones who gave the money for the temples and they weren't going anywhere," Levy said. "But by the third generation, kids went away to schools and they preferred a larger Jewish community and many went to places like Dallas, St. Louis, Houston and Atlanta and left behind an older group. It was just going to die with them as they got older."According to the temple's history, Jews had been in the Pine Bluff area since the 1840s -- before the city was incorporated -- but a congregation wasn't formed until after the Civil War.Members met in homes until a synagogue was completed in 1870 at Third and Laurel streets. In 1902 the congregation built a new temple on Second Avenue and in 1967 the congregation moved t