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Brown Paul A

2400 Fair Oaks Avenue
Altadena, CA 91001
(626) 794-7133
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Altadena CA Obituaries and Death Notices

John Van de Kamp, former California attorney general and LA County district attorney, dies at 81 - Los Angeles Times

Monday, March 27, 2017

Born in Pasadena to a bank teller and a teacher — and into a prominent family whose name was synonymous with baked goods — Van de Kamp attended a private school in Altadena, which thrust him into the outdoors and fostered in him an early appreciation for nature.By 16, the precocious student went away to Dartmouth, and after a brief foray into broadcasting, he graduated from Stanford Law School in his early 20s. He served a short stint in the military before being appointed an assistant U.S. attorney.He eventually entered politics, making an unsuccessful bid for a San Fernando Valley congressional seat, and continued working on campaigns until 1971, when he was tapped to head L.A.’s new Federal Public Defender’s Office. The job required him to switch sides, sometimes standing up to the very agencies he had once fought for.Five years later, he would reverse roles again, after being selected to replace L.A. County’s district attorney, who had died in office.“An extraordinary leader of impeccable integrity, John never backed away from taking strong, principled stands on tough issues,” Los Angeles City Atty. Mike Feuer recalled. “John was supremely effective at everything he did — always with a quiet confidence and devotion to public service that inspired generations of lawyers.”It was in this role that Van de Kamp came face to face with the infamous Hillside Stranglers case, which would blotch his public career.In 1977 and 1978, 10 young women and girls had been strangled, their bodies dumped on hillsides near downtown Los Angeles. Four years later, Van de Kamp, as district attorney, had to decide whether to prosecute one of the accused killers.One suspect, Kenneth Bianchi, had accepted responsibility for five killings in a plea bargain that spared him the death penalty. He also agreed to be the key witness against his accomplice and cousin, Angelo Buono Jr.But Bianchi began changing his story to investigators, and doubt emerged about his reliability as a witness. Ultimately, senior prosecutors recommended dropping the murder charges against Buono and instead prosecuting him on lesser sex crimes. Van de Kamp approved the plan.Then, in a bold and unusual move, Superior Court Judge Ronald George ordered the capital case to continue. It was transferred to then-Atty. Gen. George Deukmejian, whose office eventually secured Buono's conviction for nine of 10 murders.“We made an error in that case,” Van de Kamp told The Times later, during his bid for governor. “And I take full responsibility.”Despite the setback, Van de Kamp easily won election to the state attorney general’s office, where he created special units to handle child abuse, sexual assault and police shootings. It was there he launched the Cal-ID fingerprint system and, in an uncharacteristically brash move, strode into the Legislature with an AK-47 to support an effort to limit private ownership of assault weapons.But the job of being the state’s top prosecutor would expose him to new problems that would eventually hamstring his campaign for governor. In his role as attorney general, for exampl

Hunter's death in Maryland believed to be accidental - Washington Post

Monday, January 09, 2017

By Martin Weil,A California man on his first deer hunt was killed Saturday in Frederick County, Md., when his rifle discharged in an apparent accident, authorities said.Vincent Cavallo, 32, of Altadena, was hunting with an uncle on private land in the Thurmont area when the incident occurred, said Candy Thomson, spokeswoman for the Maryland Natural Resources Police.After Cavallo and his uncle split up to hunt, the uncle heard a shot and went to check. He found his nephew on the ground with a gunshot wound in the face, Thomson said.After studying the scene with its rough, rocky terrain, investigators’ preliminary conclusion was that the shooting was accidental, Thomson said. Either Cavallo slipped or he dropped the gun, causing it to fire, she said.An autopsy will be performed and an investigation is continuing, Thomson said.Saturday was the opening day of this year’s season for hunting deer with firearms, Thomson said. She said incidents such as Saturday’s were very rare.Cavallo had taken a firearms safety course, she said.The two-week season always starts the Saturday after Thanksgiving, she said, and involves hunters in the many thousands.

Marni Nixon, the Voice Behind the Screen, Dies at 86 - New York Times

Monday, July 25, 2016

The Times in 1981. “It was eerie; I had lost part of myself.”A petite, fine-boned woman who resembled Julie Andrews, Ms. Nixon was born Margaret Nixon McEathron on Feb. 22, 1930, in Altadena, Calif., near Los Angeles.She began studying the violin at 4 and throughout her childhood played bit parts — “the freckle-faced brat,” she called her typical role — in a string of Hollywood movies. At 11, already possessed of a fine singing voice, she won a vocal competition at the Los Angeles County Fair and found her true calling. She became a private pupil of Vera Schwarz, a distinguished Austrian soprano who had settled in the United States.At 17, Ms. Nixon appeared as a vocal soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Leopold Stokowski, singing in Orff’s “Carmina Burana.” She later studied opera at Tanglewood with Sarah Caldwell and Boris Goldovsky.During her teenage years, Ms. Nixon worked as a messenger at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Knowing of her musical ability — she had perfect pitch and was an impeccable sight reader — the studio began recruiting her to furnish the singing voices of young actresses. The work helped pay for Ms. Nixon’s voice lessons.Her first significant dubbing job was singing a Hindu lullaby for Margaret O’Brien in “The Secret Garden,” released in 1949.Ms. Nixon did occasionally take center stage, as when she played Eliza Doolittle in a 1964 revival of “My Fair Lady” at City Center in New York. (Ms. Andrews had played the part in the original Broadway production, which opened in 1956.) In 1965, Ms. Nixon was seen on camera in a small role as a singing nun in “The Sound of Music,” starring Ms. Andrews.On Broadway, Ms. Nixon appeared in the Sigmund Romberg musical “The Girl

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Marni Nixon, the Singing Voice Behind the Screen, Dies at 86 - New York Times

Monday, August 01, 2016

The Times in 1981. “It was eerie; I had lost part of myself.”A petite, fine-boned woman who resembled Julie Andrews, Ms. Nixon was born Margaret Nixon McEathron on Feb. 22, 1930, in Altadena, Calif., near Los Angeles.She began studying the violin at 4 and throughout her childhood played bit parts — “the freckle-faced brat,” she called her typical role — in a string of Hollywood movies. At 11, already possessed of a fine singing voice, she won a vocal competition at the Los Angeles County Fair and found her true calling. She became a private pupil of Vera Schwarz, a distinguished Austrian soprano who had settled in the United States.At 17, Ms. Nixon appeared as a vocal soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Leopold Stokowski, singing in Orff’s “Carmina Burana.” She later studied opera at Tanglewood with Sarah Caldwell and Boris Goldovsky.During her teenage years, Ms. Nixon worked as a messenger at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Knowing of her musical ability — she had perfect pitch and was an impeccable sight reader — the studio began recruiting her to furnish the singing voices of young actresses. The work helped pay for Ms. Nixon’s voice lessons.Her first significant dubbing job was singing a Hindu lullaby for Margaret O’Brien in “The Secret Garden,” released in 1949.Ms. Nixon did occasionally take center stage, as when she played Eliza Doolittle in a 1964 revival of “My Fair Lady” at City Center in New York. (Ms. Andrews had played the part in the original Broadway produc