Anaheim CA Funeral Homes

Anaheim CA funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Anaheim Cemetery , Backs Kaulbars Baggott and Schacht Anaheim Mortuary , Daly Timothy E Pierce Brothers DAL by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Anaheim funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Anaheim Cemetery

1400 East Sycamore Street
Anaheim, CA 92805
(714) 535-4928
Anaheim Cemetery funeral flowers

Backs Kaulbars Baggott and Schacht

1617 West La Palma Avenue
Anaheim, CA 92801
(714) 776-1600
Backs Kaulbars Baggott and Schacht funeral flowers

Backs Kaulbars Baggott and Schacht Anaheim Mortuary

2425 West Lincoln Avenue
Anaheim, CA 92801
(714) 828-6440
Backs Kaulbars Baggott and Schacht Anaheim Mortuary funeral flowers

Daly Timothy E Pierce Brothers DAL

2425 West Lincoln Avenue
Anaheim, CA 92801
(714) 828-6440
Daly Timothy E Pierce Brothers DAL funeral flowers

Hilgenfeld Mortuary

120 E. Broadway
Anaheim, CA 92805
(714) 535-4105
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Anaheim CA Obituaries and Death Notices

Obituary: Varjo Jurisoo, drafted by three armies, immigrated to US - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, November 14, 2016

Rudolf Hess and other war criminals during the Nuremberg trials.Unable to return home for fear of persecution, Jurisoo immigrated to the United States in the late 1940s, landing in Anaheim, Calif. He picked oranges and was given supervisory duties because of his fluency with the languages spoken by the refugee workers. But it wasn’t long before he was drafted yet a third time — by the U.S. Army for the Korean War, for which he served in Europe.When Jurisoo returned to the United States, he bounced around Chicago, North Dakota and Minneapolis, where he acted in local theater productions, before returning to Chicago. It was there at age 35 that he met his wife, Margaret Hunt, in 1959.They married in 1960 and raised two sons in Brookfield, Ill., while Jurisoo worked as a trucking firm auditor. “After he got married, he had a pretty normal life,” said David Jurisoo. “No drama after that.”The family moved to Coon Rapids in the 1970s for a job transfer. . In his later years, Jurisoo returned to a hobby he had picked up in the prisoner camp: wood carving. He carved intricate figurines and gave them out as gifts.He and his wife became active travelers, driving across the country in their RV during the winter, favoring their sons’ homes in California and Alabama, along with New Mexico.Jurisoo was active in the Good Sam RV Club and ran its website for several years.He and Margaret were quite involved with the group’s Minnesota committee, and befriended many other travelers.“It always strikes me as remarkable that a guy who had to go through so much at such a young age was not only so normal, but so engaged with the people around him,” said Hunt. “I think he was like, ‘Well, that’s kind of how life goes.’?”...

Jack Niendorf - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette

Monday, July 18, 2016

City and County of Honolulu. In California, his employment was with the Austin Company, Irvine, where he was supervising superintendent for Disney's expansion at Anaheim. Jack never missed a day of school or work, ever.Jack's service in the Marines began with training at Camp Pendleton, Calif. His drill instructor, Sgt. Daniel Laroby, said, "Camp Pendleton had never seen a recruit like him before and probably never will again." In Vietnam, in spite of being too tall for the job, he convinced his commanding officer to let him be a door gunner. Jack flew 241 missions and did things out of the ordinary and more than expected. Ignoring rules, he often left the helicopter to help save the wounded and he never shot a water buffalo. For his exemplary service he was awarded two Purple Hearts, a Bronze Star and the Congressional Medal of Honor. In the book "Medal of Honor: Quotes" published in 2012 by the Center for American Values under the heading, "This War Brought Us the Most Decorated Soldier in U.S. Military History," Jack says, "Every thing I did was by instinct. I am not a hero, nor am I braver than the next man or woman. You would have done the same."In 2010, he married Rachel Gladney, who was born in Urbana in 1965 and graduated from Urbana High School in 1983. They with their baby daughter Amelia moved to Oahu, Hawaii, where they lived until moving to California in 2015.Jack leaves his wife Rachel, their 6-year-old daughter Amelia, his sons with his former wife Linda, John (Tess), and Robert (Julie), two grandchildren, Kyle and Taylor, his mother Dorothy, brother Jerry, parents-in-law Frank and Barbara Gladney, and other family members and friends who will miss him greatly.Memorial contributions may be sent to Edward Jones, 2704 S. Boulder Drive, Suite A, Urbana, IL 61802. Checks should be made out to Edward Jones Investments and the memo line should say: Amelia Niendorf Education Fund. Further contact available at jack19472016@gmail.com.

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Obituary: Varjo Jurisoo, drafted by three armies, immigrated to US - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, November 14, 2016

Rudolf Hess and other war criminals during the Nuremberg trials.Unable to return home for fear of persecution, Jurisoo immigrated to the United States in the late 1940s, landing in Anaheim, Calif. He picked oranges and was given supervisory duties because of his fluency with the languages spoken by the refugee workers. But it wasn’t long before he was drafted yet a third time — by the U.S. Army for the Korean War, for which he served in Europe.When Jurisoo returned to the United States, he bounced around Chicago, North Dakota and Minneapolis, where he acted in local theater productions, before returning to Chicago. It was there at age 35 that he met his wife, Margaret Hunt, in 1959.They married in 1960 and raised two sons in Brookfield, Ill., while Jurisoo worked as a trucking firm auditor. “After he got married, he had a pretty normal life,” said David Jurisoo. “No drama after that.”The family moved to Coon Rapids in the 1970s for a job transfer. . In his later years, Jurisoo returned to a hobby he had picked up in the prisoner camp: wood carving. He carved intricate figurines and gave them out as gifts.He and his wife became active travelers, driving across the country in their RV during the winter, favoring their sons’ homes in California and Alabama, along with New Mexico.Jurisoo was active in the Good Sam RV Club and ran its website for several years.He and Margaret were quite involved with the group’s Minnesota committee, and befriended many other travelers.“It always strikes me as remarkable that a guy who had to go through so much at such a young age was not only so normal, but so engaged with the people around him,” said Hunt. “I think he was like, ‘Well, that’s kind of how life goes.’?”...

Jack Niendorf - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette

Monday, July 18, 2016

City and County of Honolulu. In California, his employment was with the Austin Company, Irvine, where he was supervising superintendent for Disney's expansion at Anaheim. Jack never missed a day of school or work, ever.Jack's service in the Marines began with training at Camp Pendleton, Calif. His drill instructor, Sgt. Daniel Laroby, said, "Camp Pendleton had never seen a recruit like him before and probably never will again." In Vietnam, in spite of being too tall for the job, he convinced his commanding officer to let him be a door gunner. Jack flew 241 missions and did things out of the ordinary and more than expected. Ignoring rules, he often left the helicopter to help save the wounded and he never shot a water buffalo. For his exemplary service he was awarded two Purple Hearts, a Bronze Star and the Congressional Medal of Honor. In the book "Medal of Honor: Quotes" published in 2012 by the Center for American Values under the heading, "This War Brought Us the Most Decorated Soldier in U.S. Military History," Jack says, "Every thing I did was by instinct. I am not a hero, nor am I braver than the next man or woman. You would have done the same."In 2010, he married Rachel Gladney, who was born in Urbana in 1965 and graduated from Urbana High School in 1983. They with their baby daughter Amelia moved to Oahu, Hawaii, where they lived until moving to California in 2015.Jack leaves his wife Rachel, their 6-year-old daughter Amelia, his sons with his former wife Linda, John (Tess), and Robert (Julie), two grandchildren, Kyle and Taylor, his mother Dorothy, brother Jerry, parents-in-law Frank and Barbara Gladney, and other family members and friends who will miss him greatly.Memorial contributions may be sent to Edward Jones, 2704 S. Boulder Drive, Suite A, Urbana, IL 61802. Checks should be made out to Edward Jones Investments and the memo line should say: Amelia Niendorf Education Fund. Further contact available at jack19472016@gmail.com.