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Fred Young and Company Funeral Directors

428 North Cloverdale Boulevard
Cloverdale, CA 95425
(707) 894-2540
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Cloverdale CA Obituaries and Death Notices

Donetta Mae Scott - The Banner-Graphic

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Donetta Mae Scott, 82, of Cloverdale, went to be with the lord March 25, 2017.Born March 9, 1935 to the late Clifford and Blanche (Bell) Trowbridge.She married Elva Scott May 7, 1955, and he survives.Donetta was a retired beautician and a member of Job's Daughters, and she enjoyed working for several years at DePauw University in the Hub.Above all Donetta enjoyed life the most when she was cheering for her kids, grandkids and great-grandkids in all of their sporting and extracurricular events.She is also survived by her daughters, Kathy Biggs and husband Doug, and Jody Spurgeon and husband Shane; grandchildren Scott Biggs and wife Rosslyn,Erin Howard and husband Ryan, Brooke Spurgeon and Sydney Spurgeon; great-grandchildren Maguire Biggs, Spencer Biggs, Samantha Howard and Alexandra Howard; and several nieces and nephews.She is preceded in death by her brother Charlie Trowbridge and his wife Catherine.Funeral services will be conducted at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 28 at Whitaker Funeral Home, Cloverdale.Family and...

Dothan area church services - Dothan Eagle

Monday, February 06, 2017

Ryan and Philann Stewart with Forgotten Children Ministries and Chase and Kimmey Barbrey with For Life Ministries. For more information, call Judy at 334-475-6098.Cloverdale United Methodist Church at 102 Rollins Ave. in Dothan will celebrate their 63rd Homecoming on Feb. 19. The special speaker will be the Rev. Mark Lilly. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. with a covered dish lunch following the morning worship service.Balkum Chapel Missionary Baptist Church, 10014 County Road 53, Headland, will hold a 10th Appreciation service for Pastor James E. and Charlo Melton on Sunday, Feb. 19, at 2:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Wilbert Dawsey, pastor of Burdeshaw Street Missionary Baptist Church in Dothan. All pastors and their churches are invited. Dinner will be served in the fellowship hall.Glory To Him Church, 6193 Andrews Ave., Ozark, will be celebrating its 30th Church Anniversary on Sunday, Feb. 19, at 10 a.m. with a special service featuring guest speaker, Dr. Jesse Duplantis. Known throughout the world as the “Apostle of Joy,” Jesse Duplantis has been sharing a memorable mix of strong, biblical preaching and hilarious li...

Philly couple sought in Northern California double homicide - Philly.com (blog)

Monday, November 21, 2016

Burlington County, he said.The Sheriff's Office, along with other law-enforcement authorities, is still actively searching for the couple, he said.Proto taught kindergarten and third grade in Cloverdale, Sonoma County, before starting his own business, an online obituary for him says. He died the night of the shooting.The 23-year-old woman was shot in the head and is expected to survive, Crum said.Mariana died from his wounds at a local hospital three days later. Diane Mariana O'Connor, his aunt, said he had moved to California about five years ago, but returned home often to visit his family."He was home in August. He spent a couple weeks at the Shore with his dad," said O'Connor, who lives in Drexel Hill.He was standout wrestler at Upper Darby High School and "just a great all-around kid," she said.O'Connor said her nephew used to travel around the country following music festivals, and that is how he ended up in California."No matter what he was doing, nobody deserves to be shot in the head," she said. Anyone with information about Randolph and Lebron's whereabouts is asked to call Detective Jeff Toney at 707-565-2650.Randolph is described black, about 5-foot-8, and 160 pounds. Lebron is described as Hispanic, about 5-foot-3, and 140 pounds.Staff writer Robert Moran contributed to this report.Published: November 15, 2016 — 10:56 AM EST Updated: November 15, 2016 — 8:26 PM ESTThe Philadelphia Inquirer...

Idaho Patriot Guard Riders to help bring Civil War veteran home - Idaho Statesman

Monday, August 01, 2016

The Idaho riders will take possession of the remains Monday night at the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario, Ore. They will be held overnight, along with a folded American flag, at the Cloverdale Funeral Home, 1200 N. Cloverdale Road.At 7 a.m. Tuesday, a flag line to honor Williams will form outside the funeral home as the remains are loaded for the rest of the trip through Idaho. Veterans and others wishing to pay respects to Williams are invited to attend, said Bell, a veteran of the Vietnam War.Additional stops will take place in Mountain Home, Twin Falls, Pocatello and Idaho Falls. The remains will pass to a Montana group at Monida, Mont., 80 miles north of Idaho Falls, about 3 p.m. Tuesday.The remains are scheduled to arrive in Maine on Aug. 22.“It feels great to finally do justice by him and give him the honor he deserves — a burial in a national cemetery with full military honors,” said Tom Desjardin, a Maine historian who learned that Williams’ remains were stored at the Oregon hospital.‘PROPER CREDIT’Desjardin, former Maine commissioner of education and an 11th-generation Maine resident, has studied the 20th Maine for more than four decades. He has collected information on the burial sites for 700 of the unit’s veterans, about half of the total.During a meeting last year of Maine Gov. Paul LePage’s Cabinet, Desjardin suggested to state military officials that Williams’ remains be returned to Maine for a proper burial. They agreed.“Because the 20th Maine is such a famous regiment today, people think of the members as heroes and don’t always realize that these were regular people who often died alone, in far-off institutions, without any fanfare,” Desjardin said. “Private Williams helps remind us that many who serve (in all wars) are never given the proper credit they deserve and often end up, literally or figuratively, as a forgotten can on a shelf.”After the war, Williams became a carpenter. In the 1880s he lived in Brainerd, Minn., with his second wife, Nora Carey, according to census records researched by Phyllis Zegers of Roseburg, Ore., a volunteer with the Oregon State Hospital genealogy project.The Williamses later moved to the Tacoma area in what was then Washington Territory. Williams also lived in Everett, Wash., before moving to Portland by 1903.Zegers found newspaper references that Williams spoke at schools in the Portland area between 1914 and 1919. In the 1920 census, the Portland resident was listed as a widower.On April 14, 1922, Williams was admitted to the Oregon Stat...

Cremation Is Now Outpacing Traditional Burial in the US - TIME

Monday, August 01, 2016

We didn’t talk through what kind of ceremony they would want. We didn’t focus the kind of energy on it that was often associated with burial.”Boetticher now runs the Cloverdale Funeral Home, Cemetery and Crematory in Boise, Idaho, and since his time in California, the business has completely flipped. More than 60% of Cloverdale’s clients request cremation, evident in the funeral home’s two cremation gardens filled with benches and pedestals and giant granite monoliths, all designed to hold cremated remains. “You have to embrace the consumer,” Boetticher says.Read more: Cremation: The New American Way of DeathLast year, the consumer spoke quite clearly. According to industry figures obtained by TIME, cremation surpassed traditional burial rates for the first time in the U.S., a milestone in the transformation of the $3.3 billion death industry decades in the making. According to the figures TIME reviewed, the Cremation Association of North America projects that in 2015, the cremation rate was almost 49% nationwide compared to the National Funeral Directors Association burial rate estimate of 45%. And both groups expect the trend to continue.“Cremation has become the new tradition,” says Barbara Kemmis, CANA’s executive director. “It’s a seismic shift in the profession.”In 1980, the cremation rate around the U.S. was just under 10%, and the percentage has been shifting toward cremation since. Part of the reason is cost—cremation is often thousands of dollars cheaper than burial because it doesn’t require a casket, embalming, or a cemetery plot. It’s been increasingly accepted by organized religions, including the Catholic Church, whi...

Weekly calendar - Roanoke Times

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Reunions Cloverdale School Walrond Park, 6824 Walrond Drive, Roanoke, June 26. Contact: Alice Brickey Bryant, 580-9911, or Sandra Powell Tate, 366-3224 Southwest Family and Friends Sheraton Roanoke Hotel and Conference Center, 2801 Hershberger Road, Roanoke, Aug. 5-6. Contact: Diane “Small” Richardson, 342-7038, or Glenda “Saunders” Martin, 266-7888SundayOrgan Dedication ConcertNationally known organist Hector Olivera will present and dedicate the new Allen Q58 Quantum Organ recently installed at Grandin Court Baptist Church. A celebration reception will follow.When: 3 to 5 p.m.Where: Grandin Court Baptist Church, 2660 Brambleton Avenue, RoanokeCost: FreeContact: Melissa Fox, joyfulnoise@grandincourtbaptist.org, 540-774-1684 x16MondayFranklin County Fun FestivalBring a lawn chair and enjoy this family friendly outdoor event featuring activities, music and dancing performances. Children’s activities include face painting, balloon art, dart games and more. Food, drinks, popcorn and cotton candy w...

Meet Boise's top 'taphophile' - Idaho Statesman (blog)

Sunday, June 19, 2016

John Berendt’s celebrated book, “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.” While there, Habben took some 640 photographs for his collection.Habben also works part time at Cloverdale Funeral Home and Cemetery, the Boise home known for the pet reindeer that graze its grounds. At Cloverdale, Habben helps with “everything that doesn’t require a funeral director’s license,” he said, including transporting bodies, setting up for services and handing out programs.More history than ghostsHabben, a Chicago native, said his love for cemeteries started with his hometown love for blues music. He started visiting favorite musicians’ graves and quickly realized that cemeteries were rich with history, art and intrigue.He believes people find cemeteries fascinating for one of two reasons. Some are drawn to the paranormal. People often ask Habben if he has seen wraiths wandering among the monuments. He hasn’t.“If I were a spirit and could go anywhere, why would I hang around a cemetery?” he quipped.As an experienced photographer, he’s often the “bad guy,” the one who has to tell people that the “ghost” they think they’ve captured on film is really a dust mote or the reflection off a mirror. He notes one spirit photograph that no one has been able to disprove. It’s of a woman in 1800s garb. “The Lady in White” is sitting on a stone at Bachelor’s Grove, a legendarily haunted cemetery outside Chicago not far from a pond where mobster Al Capone dumped the bodies of his enemies.Other lovers of cemeteries are like him, Habben said, “Interested in history.”“Every time I give a tour, I get people who say they’ve lived in Boise their whole lives, but didn’t know the stories they learn in the cemeteries,” said Habben.At Pioneer, one of the oldest cemeteries in the Treasure Valley, that might be a story about Orlando Robbins, “the Wyatt Earp of Idaho” during the 1800s, or about young Carrie Logan. She was a five-year-old girl who died as her pioneer parents were nearing the Valley in 1864. They waited to bury her until they got to Boise. Her stone is the oldest legible marker at Pioneer.Cemeteries are rife with symbolism that represents a whole visual language. In the past, even if someone were illiterate, he or she would have the cultural knowledge to know that a lamb carved on the headstone of a child represented innocence, or that a weeping willow represented grief. A rose in full bloom represented a fully lived life on earth. An anchor could mean that the deceased was “safely anchored in God’s harbor.” During times of Christian persecution, anchors could also double as hidden crosses.“But sometimes,” said Habben, “the deceased just liked anchors.”Despite his copious knowledge, Habben continues to study, to photograph and research. He sets challenges for himself. The Veterans Administration once offered only crosses and Stars of David to mark the graves of fallen service men and women. The VA now offers 62 “emblems of belief,” from the Wiccan pentagram to the Hammer of Thor. Habben wants to find one of each emblem on a gravestone somewhere and photograph it. He’s found 40 so far.Further proof of his devotion to the funereal arts and the history of resting places: The license plates on his car read “plots.” And he recently got a tattoo to commemorate his 15 years of researching and photographing.“One of my favorite symbols is the winged hourglass representing the flight of time, the end of earthly existence,” said Habben.He now has one on his left arm.Tour your favorite historic cemetery...

Memorial service, military honors set for retired Idaho Guard adjutant general Jack Kane - The Spokesman Review (blog)

Monday, June 06, 2016

Jack’s steadfast friendship and wise counsel.”Kane is survived by his wife Sandra; sons Scott and Matt; and two grandsons, Preston and Liam Kane.The memorial service on Tuesday will be at noon at Cloverdale Funeral Home, 1200 N. Cloverdale Road; following the service, Kane will be laid to rest with full military honors at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery at 3 p.m.

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Cloverdale News

Donetta Mae Scott - The Banner-Graphic

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Donetta Mae Scott, 82, of Cloverdale, went to be with the lord March 25, 2017.Born March 9, 1935 to the late Clifford and Blanche (Bell) Trowbridge.She married Elva Scott May 7, 1955, and he survives.Donetta was a retired beautician and a member of Job's Daughters, and she enjoyed working for several years at DePauw University in the Hub.Above all Donetta enjoyed life the most when she was cheering for her kids, grandkids and great-grandkids in all of their sporting and extracurricular events.She is also survived by her daughters, Kathy Biggs and husband Doug, and Jody Spurgeon and husband Shane; grandchildren Scott Biggs and wife Rosslyn,Erin Howard and husband Ryan, Brooke Spurgeon and Sydney Spurgeon; great-grandchildren Maguire Biggs, Spencer Biggs, Samantha Howard and Alexandra Howard; and several nieces and nephews.She is preceded in death by her brother Charlie Trowbridge and his wife Catherine.Funeral services will be conducted at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 28 at Whitaker Funeral Home, Cloverdale.Family and...

Dothan area church services - Dothan Eagle

Monday, February 06, 2017

Ryan and Philann Stewart with Forgotten Children Ministries and Chase and Kimmey Barbrey with For Life Ministries. For more information, call Judy at 334-475-6098.Cloverdale United Methodist Church at 102 Rollins Ave. in Dothan will celebrate their 63rd Homecoming on Feb. 19. The special speaker will be the Rev. Mark Lilly. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. with a covered dish lunch following the morning worship service.Balkum Chapel Missionary Baptist Church, 10014 County Road 53, Headland, will hold a 10th Appreciation service for Pastor James E. and Charlo Melton on Sunday, Feb. 19, at 2:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Wilbert Dawsey, pastor of Burdeshaw Street Missionary Baptist Church in Dothan. All pastors and their churches are invited. Dinner will be served in the fellowship hall.Glory To Him Church, 6193 Andrews Ave., Ozark, will be celebrating its 30th Church Anniversary on Sunday, Feb. 19, at 10 a.m. with a special service featuring guest speaker, Dr. Jesse Duplantis. Known throughout the world as the “Apostle of Joy,” Jesse Duplantis has been sharing a memorable mix of strong, biblical preaching and hilarious li...

Philly couple sought in Northern California double homicide - Philly.com (blog)

Monday, November 21, 2016

Burlington County, he said.The Sheriff's Office, along with other law-enforcement authorities, is still actively searching for the couple, he said.Proto taught kindergarten and third grade in Cloverdale, Sonoma County, before starting his own business, an online obituary for him says. He died the night of the shooting.The 23-year-old woman was shot in the head and is expected to survive, Crum said.Mariana died from his wounds at a local hospital three days later. Diane Mariana O'Connor, his aunt, said he had moved to California about five years ago, but returned home often to visit his family."He was home in August. He spent a couple weeks at the Shore with his dad," said O'Connor, who lives in Drexel Hill.He was standout wrestler at Upper Darby High School and "just a great all-around kid," she said.O'Connor said her nephew used to travel around the country following music festivals, and that is how he ended up in California."No matter what he was doing, nobody deserves to be shot in the head," she said. Anyone with information about Randolph and Lebron's whereabouts is asked to call Detective Jeff Toney at 707-565-2650.Randolph is described black, about 5-foot-8, and 160 pounds. Lebron is described as Hispanic, about 5-foot-3, and 140 pounds.Staff writer Robert Moran contributed to this report.Published: November 15, 2016 — 10:56 AM EST Updated: November 15, 2016 — 8:26 PM ESTThe Philadelphia Inquirer...

Idaho Patriot Guard Riders to help bring Civil War veteran home - Idaho Statesman

Monday, August 01, 2016

The Idaho riders will take possession of the remains Monday night at the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario, Ore. They will be held overnight, along with a folded American flag, at the Cloverdale Funeral Home, 1200 N. Cloverdale Road.At 7 a.m. Tuesday, a flag line to honor Williams will form outside the funeral home as the remains are loaded for the rest of the trip through Idaho. Veterans and others wishing to pay respects to Williams are invited to attend, said Bell, a veteran of the Vietnam War.Additional stops will take place in Mountain Home, Twin Falls, Pocatello and Idaho Falls. The remains will pass to a Montana group at Monida, Mont., 80 miles north of Idaho Falls, about 3 p.m. Tuesday.The remains are scheduled to arrive in Maine on Aug. 22.“It feels great to finally do justice by him and give him the honor he deserves — a burial in a national cemetery with full military honors,” said Tom Desjardin, a Maine historian who learned that Williams’ remains were stored at the Oregon hospital.‘PROPER CREDIT’Desjardin, former Maine commissioner of education and an 11th-generation Maine resident, has studied the 20th Maine for more than four decades. He has collected information on the burial sites for 700 of the unit’s veterans, about half of the total.During a meeting last year of Maine Gov. Paul LePage’s Cabinet, Desjardin suggested to state military officials that Williams’ remains be returned to Maine for a proper burial. They agreed.“Because the 20th Maine is such a famous regiment today, people think of the members as heroes and don’t always realize that these were regular people who often died alone, in far-off institutions, without any fanfare,” Desjardin said. “Private Williams helps remind us that many who serve (in all wars) are never given the proper credit they deserve and often end up, literally or figuratively, as a forgotten can on a shelf.”After the war, Williams became a carpenter. In the 1880s he lived in Brainerd, Minn., with his second wife, Nora Carey, according to census records researched by Phyllis Zegers of Roseburg, Ore., a volunteer with the Oregon State Hospital genealogy project.The Williamses later moved to the Tacoma area in what was then Washington Territory. Williams also lived in Everett, Wash., before moving to Portland by 1903.Zegers found newspaper references that Williams spoke at schools in the Portland area between 1914 and 1919. In the 1920 census, the Portland resident was listed as a widower.On April 14, 1922, Williams was admitted to the Oregon Stat...

Cremation Is Now Outpacing Traditional Burial in the US - TIME

Monday, August 01, 2016

We didn’t talk through what kind of ceremony they would want. We didn’t focus the kind of energy on it that was often associated with burial.”Boetticher now runs the Cloverdale Funeral Home, Cemetery and Crematory in Boise, Idaho, and since his time in California, the business has completely flipped. More than 60% of Cloverdale’s clients request cremation, evident in the funeral home’s two cremation gardens filled with benches and pedestals and giant granite monoliths, all designed to hold cremated remains. “You have to embrace the consumer,” Boetticher says.Read more: Cremation: The New American Way of DeathLast year, the consumer spoke quite clearly. According to industry figures obtained by TIME, cremation surpassed traditional burial rates for the first time in the U.S., a milestone in the transformation of the $3.3 billion death industry decades in the making. According to the figures TIME reviewed, the Cremation Association of North America projects that in 2015, the cremation rate was almost 49% nationwide compared to the National Funeral Directors Association burial rate estimate of 45%. And both groups expect the trend to continue.“Cremation has become the new tradition,” says Barbara Kemmis, CANA’s executive director. “It’s a seismic shift in the profession.”In 1980, the cremation rate around the U.S. was just under 10%, and the percentage has been shifting toward cremation since. Part of the reason is cost—cremation is often thousands of dollars cheaper than burial because it doesn’t require a casket, embalming, or a cemetery plot. It’s been increasingly accepted by organized religions, including the Catholic Church, whi...

Weekly calendar - Roanoke Times

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Reunions Cloverdale School Walrond Park, 6824 Walrond Drive, Roanoke, June 26. Contact: Alice Brickey Bryant, 580-9911, or Sandra Powell Tate, 366-3224 Southwest Family and Friends Sheraton Roanoke Hotel and Conference Center, 2801 Hershberger Road, Roanoke, Aug. 5-6. Contact: Diane “Small” Richardson, 342-7038, or Glenda “Saunders” Martin, 266-7888SundayOrgan Dedication ConcertNationally known organist Hector Olivera will present and dedicate the new Allen Q58 Quantum Organ recently installed at Grandin Court Baptist Church. A celebration reception will follow.When: 3 to 5 p.m.Where: Grandin Court Baptist Church, 2660 Brambleton Avenue, RoanokeCost: FreeContact: Melissa Fox, joyfulnoise@grandincourtbaptist.org, 540-774-1684 x16MondayFranklin County Fun FestivalBring a lawn chair and enjoy this family friendly outdoor event featuring activities, music and dancing performances. Children’s activities include face painting, balloon art, dart games and more. Food, drinks, popcorn and cotton candy w...

Meet Boise's top 'taphophile' - Idaho Statesman (blog)

Sunday, June 19, 2016

John Berendt’s celebrated book, “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.” While there, Habben took some 640 photographs for his collection.Habben also works part time at Cloverdale Funeral Home and Cemetery, the Boise home known for the pet reindeer that graze its grounds. At Cloverdale, Habben helps with “everything that doesn’t require a funeral director’s license,” he said, including transporting bodies, setting up for services and handing out programs.More history than ghostsHabben, a Chicago native, said his love for cemeteries started with his hometown love for blues music. He started visiting favorite musicians’ graves and quickly realized that cemeteries were rich with history, art and intrigue.He believes people find cemeteries fascinating for one of two reasons. Some are drawn to the paranormal. People often ask Habben if he has seen wraiths wandering among the monuments. He hasn’t.“If I were a spirit and could go anywhere, why would I hang around a cemetery?” he quipped.As an experienced photographer, he’s often the “bad guy,” the one who has to tell people that the “ghost” they think they’ve captured on film is really a dust mote or the reflection off a mirror. He notes one spirit photograph that no one has been able to disprove. It’s of a woman in 1800s garb. “The Lady in White” is sitting on a stone at Bachelor’s Grove, a legendarily haunted cemetery outside Chicago not far from a pond where mobster Al Capone dumped the bodies of his enemies.Other lovers of cemeteries are like him, Habben said, “Interested in history.”“Every time I give a tour, I get people who say they’ve lived in Boise their whole lives, but didn’t know the stories they learn in the cemeteries,” said Habben.At Pioneer, one of the oldest cemeteries in the Treasure Valley, that might be a story about Orlando Robbins, “the Wyatt Earp of Idaho” during the 1800s, or about young Carrie Logan. She was a five-year-old girl who died as her pioneer parents were nearing the Valley in 1864. They waited to bury her until they got to Boise. Her stone is the oldest legible marker at Pioneer.Cemeteries are rife with symbolism that represents a whole visual language. In the past, even if someone were illiterate, he or she would have the cultural knowledge to know that a lamb carved on the headstone of a child represented innocence, or that a weeping willow represented grief. A rose in full bloom represented a fully lived life on earth. An anchor could mean that the deceased was “safely anchored in God’s harbor.” During times of Christian persecution, anchors could also double as hidden crosses.“But sometimes,” said Habben, “the deceased just liked anchors.”Despite his copious knowledge, Habben continues to study, to photograph and research. He sets challenges for himself. The Veterans Administration once offered only crosses and Stars of David to mark the graves of fallen service men and women. The VA now offers 62 “emblems of belief,” from the Wiccan pentagram to the Hammer of Thor. Habben wants to find one of each emblem on a gravestone somewhere and photograph it. He’s found 40 so far.Further proof of his devotion to the funereal arts and the history of resting places: The license plates on his car read “plots.” And he recently got a tattoo to commemorate his 15 years of researching and photographing.“One of my favorite symbols is the winged hourglass representing the flight of time, the end of earthly existence,” said Habben.He now has one on his left arm.Tour your favorite historic cemetery...

Memorial service, military honors set for retired Idaho Guard adjutant general Jack Kane - The Spokesman Review (blog)

Monday, June 06, 2016

Jack’s steadfast friendship and wise counsel.”Kane is survived by his wife Sandra; sons Scott and Matt; and two grandsons, Preston and Liam Kane.The memorial service on Tuesday will be at noon at Cloverdale Funeral Home, 1200 N. Cloverdale Road; following the service, Kane will be laid to rest with full military honors at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery at 3 p.m.