Colma CA Funeral Homes

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Colma Cremation and Funeral Services

7747 Mission Street
Colma, CA 94014
(650) 757-1300
Colma Cremation and Funeral Services funeral flowers

Cypress Lawn

1370 El Camino Real
Colma, CA 94014
(650) 755-0580
Cypress Lawn funeral flowers

Cypress Lawn Funeral Home

1370 El Camino Real
Colma, CA 94014
(650) 550-8808
Cypress Lawn Funeral Home funeral flowers

Eternal Home Cemetery

1051 El Camino Real
Colma, CA 94014
(650) 755-5236
Eternal Home Cemetery funeral flowers

Pet's Rest Cemetery and Crematory

1905 Hillside Boulevard
Colma, CA 94014
(650) 755-2201
Pet's Rest Cemetery and Crematory funeral flowers

Colma CA Obituaries and Death Notices

May 29-30: Presidio Memorial Day Commemoration, Cypress Lawn Service, American history walking tour ... - San Francisco Examiner

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Purple Heart recipient, Eldridge “Eric” Hubert, a corporal in the U.S. Army 79th Infantry in World War II. [1 p.m., Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, 1370 El Camino Real, Colma]American history walking tour: The S.F. City Guides-sponsored event is led by Patrick Sanchez and Nancy Rios, who tell the stories behind the statues, plaques amd monuments in Golden Gate Park. [1 p.m., meet at Conservatory of Flowers, 100 John F. Kennedy Drive, Golden Gate Park, S.F.]Conservatory of Flowers: The historical landmark, which offers an intimate up-close experience with rare and endangered plants, is open for the Memorial Day holiday. [10 a.m. to 6 p.m., 100 John F. Kennedy Drive, Golden Gate Park., S.F.]?Continue Reading Below[advertisement][advertisement]Circo Hermanos Caballero: The family show, of comedy and circus acts including amazing trapeze artists — and no animals — concludes a five-day run. [7:30 p.m., behind JC Penney, Shops at Tanforan, 1150 El Camino Real, San Bruno]Sh*t-Kickin’ Memorial Day Party: The 22nd annual bash boasts lives music (Smelly Kelley & Friends, 77 El Deora, The Evangenitals and Angelica Rockne) and barbecue while it lasts. [4 p.m., El Rio, 3158 Mission St., S.F.]The Shining Backwards and Forwards: The experiment by John Fell Ryan — who appears via Skype — plays Stanley Kubrick’s film classic forwards and backwards at the same time on the same screen, creating bizarre juxtapositions; Rodney Ascher, director of the documentary “Room 237” about “The Shining,” also comments, via Skype. [8:30 p.m., Roxie, 3117 16th St., S.F.]Pint Sized Plays-Date Night: The free festival presents...

Emory W. "Bin" Wise

Monday, February 27, 2017

National Union Division of Philco Ford, Lansdale, where he met his future wife. He also was employed as a truck driver for Lansdale Transportation, Lansdale and Roadway and Contract Service, both of Colmar, and Ryder Truck Rental and Leasing, Pennsburg. After his retirement, he served as a driver for the IHM sisters of Marywood in Scranton.Mr. Wise was a long-time member of St. Agnes Catholic Church, Sellersville and the former St. Cecilia’s Catholic Church in Exeter.Emory was a lifetime member of the Sellersville Fire Department. He was also a life member of the Nase-Kraft American Legion Post 255 and a former member of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge 1539, both of Sellersville.Mr. Wise is survived by his two sons, Ronald L. Wise and his wife, Kathy; Steven J. Wise and his wife, Linda, all of Sellersville; two daughters, Kathleen A. Groves and her husband, Daryl, of Bladenboro, NC; Christine Brewer and her husband, Chip, of Lansdale; eleven grandchildren, Derrick, Daniel, Jennifer and Adam Groves; Holly Wise; Kelly Moore; Jonathan, Nathan, and Benjamin Wise; and William and Katherine Brewer; five great-grandchildren, Tiffany, Vanessa, Carrie, Conner, and Grayson; and a great-great-grandson, Henry. He is also survived by three brothers, Frank Wise, of Wilmington, DE; Samuel James Wise and his wife, Marie, of Hanover; Timothy Wise and his wife, Anita, of Lebanon; a sister-in-law, Marlene "Molly" Laverick, of Doylestown; and a brother-in-law, Robert Weidemoyer, of Sellersville.In addition to his wife, he was preceded in death by a son, David Wise, and his siblings, John Edwin Wise, Grace Huff, Dorothy Fitser, Elnora Klebe, and Barbara Detwiler.A visitation will be held from 7-8:30 p.m., Friday, January 13, in the Betty Meier Steeley Funeral Home, 87 North Main Street, Sellersville, PA 18960. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m., Saturday, January 14, in St. Agnes Catholic Church, 445 North Main Street, Sellersville, PA 18960, with a brief visitation at church from 10-10:45 a.m. prior to Mass. Interment will follow in the adjoining parish cemetery.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Sellersville Fire Department, P. O. Box 315, Sellersville, PA 18960.

Hundreds mourn beloved homeless man at funeral for him at Catholic church - Catholic News Service

Monday, December 05, 2016

Mortuary donated a casket and prepared the body for burial. A special collection was taken during the Mass so that Hooker might be laid to rest with dignity and a headstone at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.According to a Richmond District blog, Hooker was originally from Trinidad and had spent time in Chicago before coming to San Francisco.Every day, Hooker worked his way along Clement Street with his shopping cart and would stand at a corner near Walgreens, usually talking to himself."This was a man who never asked for anything," Lea Grey Dimond, owner of Thidwick Books on Clement Street, told Catholic San Francisco, the archdiocesan newspaper.Hooker was one of three individuals profiled in a documentary about mental illness called "Voices." In the trailer for the documentary, Hooker says with a huge grin: "I suffer a lot, you know, and when you suffer, you must know to be kind."At a reception in the school gym following the funeral Mass for him, the community took turns sharing memories of Hooker and offering parting thoughts. "Voices" was shown afterward."Thomas had a gift for loving generously and unconditionally," said one speaker. "He brought our community something rare and special."A man in tears said he was overcome by the overflowing crowd who had come out to honor Hooker. The tears turned to laughter when he confessed he often "gave my money to Thomas instead of the church."Star of the Sea parishioners Arnold and Jean Low had brought food to Hooker for more than 20 years and were the ones to find him unresponsive on the morning of his death."Thomas was a kind and friendly soul, always had a smile on his face, always had something complimentary to say to you," said Arnold Low. "There are other homeless souls for you to reach out to.Also keep this in mind, he said: "When I am thirsty, you gave me to drink, when I was hungry, you gave me to eat, when I was cold you gave me clothes. Whatever you do for others, you do for me your Lord our God."- - -Gray is on the staff of Catholic San Francisco, newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco.

Hundreds mourn beloved homeless man at Star of the Sea parish - Catholic San Francisco

Monday, November 21, 2016

Mortuary, donated a casket and prepared the body for burial. A special collection was taken during the Mass so that Hooker might be laid to rest with dignity and a headstone at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.According to a Richmond District blog, Hooker was originally from Trinidad and had spent time in Chicago before coming to San Francisco.“This was a man who never asked for anything,” said Lea Grey Dimond, the owner of Thidwick Books on Clement Street.Every day, Hooker worked his way along Clement Street with his shopping cart, and would stand at the corner of Ninth Avenue near Walgreens, usually talking to himself.Hooker was one of three individuals profiled in a documentary about mental illness called “Voices.”In the trailer for the documentary Hooker says with a huge grin: “I suffer a lot, you know, and when you suffer you must know to be kind.”At a reception in the school gym following the Mass, the community took turns sharing memories of Hooker and offering parting thoughts. “Voices” was shown afterward.“Thomas had a gift for loving generously and unconditionally,” said one speaker. “He brought our community something rare and special.”A man in tears said he was overcome by the overflowing crowd who had come out to honor Hooker. The tears turned to laughter when he confessed he often “gave my money to Thomas instead of the church.”Star of the Sea parishioners Arnold and Jean Low had brought food to Hooker for more than 20 years and were the ones to find him unresponsive on the morning of his death.“Thomas was a kind and friendly soul, always had a smile on his face, always had something complimentary to say to you,” said Arnold Low. “There are other homeless souls for you to reach out to.Also keep this in mind he said, “When I am thirsty, you gave me to drink, when I was hungry, you gave me to eat, when I was cold you gave me clothes. Whatever you do for others, you do for me your Lord our God.”From November 17, 2016 issue of Catholic San Francisco.

Last gasp for S.F.'s long tradition of funeral homes - San Francisco Chronicle

Monday, November 14, 2016

He has been looking for locations in the neighborhood, as well as the possibility of relocating to the grounds of one of the cemeteries in Colma.“That’s the trend — mortuaries on cemetery property. Being a one-stop shop seems to appeal to the new generation of client,” he said. “That’s not our business, but it is the trend.”O’Hara said that he is lucky that his kids want to keep the business going, and his funeral home has started to specialize in Buddhist ceremonies popular in the heavily Chinese Richmond District.“It’s like the family farm — you have a business you are operating, and then you have the underlying land value that you tend to ignore as long as things are going well and the tax burden is not too bad,” said O’Hara. “I hate to be the predictor of bad news, but the business is going through consolidation, and cremations are going to dominate more and more.”J.K. Dineen is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: jdineen@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @sfjkdineen...

The October 1916 Oberdorf Raid in Germany produced the first American ace - AirForceTimes.com

Monday, October 17, 2016

The British suffered similar losses at the onset, with four Sopwiths turning back with engine trouble and a fifth crashing at Faucogney 25 minutes after takeoff.Ahead lay the German aerodrome at Colmar-Nord, from which Royal Bavarian Feldfliegerabteilung (Flying Detachment) 9 – or Fl.Abt. 9b – operated six Ago C. I two-seat, twin-boom pusher biplanes, with a small fighter component based to the south. Farther south, at Habsheim, was another flying detachment and a unit equipped with Fokker E.III and D.II fighters, of Jasta 15. At 3:04 p.m., the operations room at Colmar received a telephone call that five enemy planes were flying east. Suspecting its own aerodrome to be the target, Fl.Abt. 9b scrambled all of its planes, including three Fokker D.IIs flown by Lt. Otto Kissenberth and senior NCOs Ludwig Hanstein and Ludwig Hilz.The four Farmans of F.29, at the head of the aerial procession, surprised the German defenses, dropped their bombs on Oberndorf unopposed, and returned to Luxeuil safely, with one of its crews claiming a Fokker over the target area. But as F.123’s three Farmans approached Colmar, they were stalked  by German Fokkers.Kissenberth was first to score, sending the lead Farman down in the woods, where its exploding bombs created a funeral pyre for its crew. Kissenberth then shot down a second Farman before landing to phone in his first report.Some of the members of fighter squadron N.124, l’Escadrille Américaine, gather at Luxeuil-les-Bains, France, in May 1916: From left, Cpl. Victor Chapman, Sgt. Elliott C. Cowdin, Sgt. W. Bert Hall, Sub Lt. William Thaw, Capt. George Thenault, Lt. Alfred de Laage de Meux, Sgt. Norman Prince, Cpl. Kiffri Rockwell and Cpl. James Rogers McConnell. Photo Credit: Collection S.H.A.A.Just after bombing Oberndorf, nine Sopwiths of 3 Wing came under attack by German fighters, including Kissenberth and Hilz, who had just replenished their fuel and ammunition. Kissenberth damaged a Sopwith’s engine, but its Canadian pilot, Flight Sub-Lt. Raymond Collishaw, managed to limp back to Luxeuil. Kissenberth then landed at Freiburg, where he was joined by two other aircraft—Hanstein’s Fokker and an enemy bomber. Hanstein had wounded the Sopwith’s Canadian pilot, Flight Sub-Lt. Charles H.S. Butterworth, and forced him to land at a nearby parade field.For the Allies, the worst aerial carnage still lay ahead.While waiting to rendezvous with BM.120’s eight Breguets, N.124’s pilots spotted and engaged four Fokker E.IIIs north of Colmar, with Prince downing one of them. With N.124 guarding their flanks, the bombers flew on, but as they emerged from the Vosges to the southwest, Jasta 15 scrambled up several fighters to intercept.Among them was Lt. Ernst Udet, who disabled a Breguet IV whose crew made a dead-stick landing with all their bombs still on the racks. Udet landed nearby. “Because my tires were punctured by shots,” he wrote, “I turned over, but without serious consequences. It was a comical picture; the vanquished landed upright and the victor landed upside-down. Both Frenchmen clambered down and we shook hands all around.”Having failed to intercept F.29 and F.123, three of Fl.Abt.9b’s Ago C.Is turned west and were making a wide turn near Rosskopf when they ran right into BM.120. The German commander, Lt. Walter Kiliani, and his pilot, Lt. Hans Hartl, joined a Jasta 15 pilot, Lt. Otto Pfälzer, in forcing down a Breguet near Bremgarten. Upon landing nearby, Kiliani was warned off by the French crewmen, who had already set their plane on fire. Shortly afterward, the Breguet’s bombs went off. Hilz, who joined the melee, sent a Breguet down in flames over Umkirch. An Ago C.I engaged another Breguet in a running fight along the length of the Elzacher valley until it ran out of ammunition.N.124 had hardly been idle during the fight. Didier Masson fired 50 rounds at ...

The American Town Where the Dead Outnumber the Living by a Thousand to One - odditycentral (blog)

Monday, October 10, 2016

Colma, a quiet Californian town of roughly two square miles is home to 1,700 living residents and over 1.5 million dead ones. Most of the town’s forever-silent population are people who lived and died in San Francisco, but, just like most of today’s living residents, couldn’t afford to spend their afterlives in the expensive metropolis.In the year 1900, San Francisco was a city crowded by the dead. During the gold rush, gold miners, merchants and immigrants from all around the world  flocked here in search of a better life, bringing with them disease, and as the death toll rose, the 27 cemeteries filled to the brink of overflowing. They were considered a health hazard, but most importantly, they were taking up a large chunk of prime real-estate, so in 1902, the City and the County Board of Supervisors banned further burials in the city and forced larger cemeteries like Laurel Hill and Calvary Cemetry to move their residents outside the city. The fight to keep the dead in their original...

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May 29-30: Presidio Memorial Day Commemoration, Cypress Lawn Service, American history walking tour ... - San Francisco Examiner

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Purple Heart recipient, Eldridge “Eric” Hubert, a corporal in the U.S. Army 79th Infantry in World War II. [1 p.m., Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, 1370 El Camino Real, Colma]American history walking tour: The S.F. City Guides-sponsored event is led by Patrick Sanchez and Nancy Rios, who tell the stories behind the statues, plaques amd monuments in Golden Gate Park. [1 p.m., meet at Conservatory of Flowers, 100 John F. Kennedy Drive, Golden Gate Park, S.F.]Conservatory of Flowers: The historical landmark, which offers an intimate up-close experience with rare and endangered plants, is open for the Memorial Day holiday. [10 a.m. to 6 p.m., 100 John F. Kennedy Drive, Golden Gate Park., S.F.]?Continue Reading Below[advertisement][advertisement]Circo Hermanos Caballero: The family show, of comedy and circus acts including amazing trapeze artists — and no animals — concludes a five-day run. [7:30 p.m., behind JC Penney, Shops at Tanforan, 1150 El Camino Real, San Bruno]Sh*t-Kickin’ Memorial Day Party: The 22nd annual bash boasts lives music (Smelly Kelley & Friends, 77 El Deora, The Evangenitals and Angelica Rockne) and barbecue while it lasts. [4 p.m., El Rio, 3158 Mission St., S.F.]The Shining Backwards and Forwards: The experiment by John Fell Ryan — who appears via Skype — plays Stanley Kubrick’s film classic forwards and backwards at the same time on the same screen, creating bizarre juxtapositions; Rodney Ascher, director of the documentary “Room 237” about “The Shining,” also comments, via Skype. [8:30 p.m., Roxie, 3117 16th St., S.F.]Pint Sized Plays-Date Night: The free festival presents...

Emory W. "Bin" Wise

Monday, February 27, 2017

National Union Division of Philco Ford, Lansdale, where he met his future wife. He also was employed as a truck driver for Lansdale Transportation, Lansdale and Roadway and Contract Service, both of Colmar, and Ryder Truck Rental and Leasing, Pennsburg. After his retirement, he served as a driver for the IHM sisters of Marywood in Scranton.Mr. Wise was a long-time member of St. Agnes Catholic Church, Sellersville and the former St. Cecilia’s Catholic Church in Exeter.Emory was a lifetime member of the Sellersville Fire Department. He was also a life member of the Nase-Kraft American Legion Post 255 and a former member of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge 1539, both of Sellersville.Mr. Wise is survived by his two sons, Ronald L. Wise and his wife, Kathy; Steven J. Wise and his wife, Linda, all of Sellersville; two daughters, Kathleen A. Groves and her husband, Daryl, of Bladenboro, NC; Christine Brewer and her husband, Chip, of Lansdale; eleven grandchildren, Derrick, Daniel, Jennifer and Adam Groves; Holly Wise; Kelly Moore; Jonathan, Nathan, and Benjamin Wise; and William and Katherine Brewer; five great-grandchildren, Tiffany, Vanessa, Carrie, Conner, and Grayson; and a great-great-grandson, Henry. He is also survived by three brothers, Frank Wise, of Wilmington, DE; Samuel James Wise and his wife, Marie, of Hanover; Timothy Wise and his wife, Anita, of Lebanon; a sister-in-law, Marlene "Molly" Laverick, of Doylestown; and a brother-in-law, Robert Weidemoyer, of Sellersville.In addition to his wife, he was preceded in death by a son, David Wise, and his siblings, John Edwin Wise, Grace Huff, Dorothy Fitser, Elnora Klebe, and Barbara Detwiler.A visitation will be held from 7-8:30 p.m., Friday, January 13, in the Betty Meier Steeley Funeral Home, 87 North Main Street, Sellersville, PA 18960. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m., Saturday, January 14, in St. Agnes Catholic Church, 445 North Main Street, Sellersville, PA 18960, with a brief visitation at church from 10-10:45 a.m. prior to Mass. Interment will follow in the adjoining parish cemetery.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Sellersville Fire Department, P. O. Box 315, Sellersville, PA 18960.

Hundreds mourn beloved homeless man at funeral for him at Catholic church - Catholic News Service

Monday, December 05, 2016

Mortuary donated a casket and prepared the body for burial. A special collection was taken during the Mass so that Hooker might be laid to rest with dignity and a headstone at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.According to a Richmond District blog, Hooker was originally from Trinidad and had spent time in Chicago before coming to San Francisco.Every day, Hooker worked his way along Clement Street with his shopping cart and would stand at a corner near Walgreens, usually talking to himself."This was a man who never asked for anything," Lea Grey Dimond, owner of Thidwick Books on Clement Street, told Catholic San Francisco, the archdiocesan newspaper.Hooker was one of three individuals profiled in a documentary about mental illness called "Voices." In the trailer for the documentary, Hooker says with a huge grin: "I suffer a lot, you know, and when you suffer, you must know to be kind."At a reception in the school gym following the funeral Mass for him, the community took turns sharing memories of Hooker and offering parting thoughts. "Voices" was shown afterward."Thomas had a gift for loving generously and unconditionally," said one speaker. "He brought our community something rare and special."A man in tears said he was overcome by the overflowing crowd who had come out to honor Hooker. The tears turned to laughter when he confessed he often "gave my money to Thomas instead of the church."Star of the Sea parishioners Arnold and Jean Low had brought food to Hooker for more than 20 years and were the ones to find him unresponsive on the morning of his death."Thomas was a kind and friendly soul, always had a smile on his face, always had something complimentary to say to you," said Arnold Low. "There are other homeless souls for you to reach out to.Also keep this in mind, he said: "When I am thirsty, you gave me to drink, when I was hungry, you gave me to eat, when I was cold you gave me clothes. Whatever you do for others, you do for me your Lord our God."- - -Gray is on the staff of Catholic San Francisco, newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco.

Hundreds mourn beloved homeless man at Star of the Sea parish - Catholic San Francisco

Monday, November 21, 2016

Mortuary, donated a casket and prepared the body for burial. A special collection was taken during the Mass so that Hooker might be laid to rest with dignity and a headstone at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.According to a Richmond District blog, Hooker was originally from Trinidad and had spent time in Chicago before coming to San Francisco.“This was a man who never asked for anything,” said Lea Grey Dimond, the owner of Thidwick Books on Clement Street.Every day, Hooker worked his way along Clement Street with his shopping cart, and would stand at the corner of Ninth Avenue near Walgreens, usually talking to himself.Hooker was one of three individuals profiled in a documentary about mental illness called “Voices.”In the trailer for the documentary Hooker says with a huge grin: “I suffer a lot, you know, and when you suffer you must know to be kind.”At a reception in the school gym following the Mass, the community took turns sharing memories of Hooker and offering parting thoughts. “Voices” was shown afterward.“Thomas had a gift for loving generously and unconditionally,” said one speaker. “He brought our community something rare and special.”A man in tears said he was overcome by the overflowing crowd who had come out to honor Hooker. The tears turned to laughter when he confessed he often “gave my money to Thomas instead of the church.”Star of the Sea parishioners Arnold and Jean Low had brought food to Hooker for more than 20 years and were the ones to find him unresponsive on the morning of his death.“Thomas was a kind and friendly soul, always had a smile on his face, always had something complimentary to say to you,” said Arnold Low. “There are other homeless souls for you to reach out to.Also keep this in mind he said, “When I am thirsty, you gave me to drink, when I was hungry, you gave me to eat, when I was cold you gave me clothes. Whatever you do for others, you do for me your Lord our God.”From November 17, 2016 issue of Catholic San Francisco.

Last gasp for S.F.'s long tradition of funeral homes - San Francisco Chronicle

Monday, November 14, 2016

He has been looking for locations in the neighborhood, as well as the possibility of relocating to the grounds of one of the cemeteries in Colma.“That’s the trend — mortuaries on cemetery property. Being a one-stop shop seems to appeal to the new generation of client,” he said. “That’s not our business, but it is the trend.”O’Hara said that he is lucky that his kids want to keep the business going, and his funeral home has started to specialize in Buddhist ceremonies popular in the heavily Chinese Richmond District.“It’s like the family farm — you have a business you are operating, and then you have the underlying land value that you tend to ignore as long as things are going well and the tax burden is not too bad,” said O’Hara. “I hate to be the predictor of bad news, but the business is going through consolidation, and cremations are going to dominate more and more.”J.K. Dineen is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: jdineen@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @sfjkdineen...

The October 1916 Oberdorf Raid in Germany produced the first American ace - AirForceTimes.com

Monday, October 17, 2016

The British suffered similar losses at the onset, with four Sopwiths turning back with engine trouble and a fifth crashing at Faucogney 25 minutes after takeoff.Ahead lay the German aerodrome at Colmar-Nord, from which Royal Bavarian Feldfliegerabteilung (Flying Detachment) 9 – or Fl.Abt. 9b – operated six Ago C. I two-seat, twin-boom pusher biplanes, with a small fighter component based to the south. Farther south, at Habsheim, was another flying detachment and a unit equipped with Fokker E.III and D.II fighters, of Jasta 15. At 3:04 p.m., the operations room at Colmar received a telephone call that five enemy planes were flying east. Suspecting its own aerodrome to be the target, Fl.Abt. 9b scrambled all of its planes, including three Fokker D.IIs flown by Lt. Otto Kissenberth and senior NCOs Ludwig Hanstein and Ludwig Hilz.The four Farmans of F.29, at the head of the aerial procession, surprised the German defenses, dropped their bombs on Oberndorf unopposed, and returned to Luxeuil safely, with one of its crews claiming a Fokker over the target area. But as F.123’s three Farmans approached Colmar, they were stalked  by German Fokkers.Kissenberth was first to score, sending the lead Farman down in the woods, where its exploding bombs created a funeral pyre for its crew. Kissenberth then shot down a second Farman before landing to phone in his first report.Some of the members of fighter squadron N.124, l’Escadrille Américaine, gather at Luxeuil-les-Bains, France, in May 1916: From left, Cpl. Victor Chapman, Sgt. Elliott C. Cowdin, Sgt. W. Bert Hall, Sub Lt. William Thaw, Capt. George Thenault, Lt. Alfred de Laage de Meux, Sgt. Norman Prince, Cpl. Kiffri Rockwell and Cpl. James Rogers McConnell. Photo Credit: Collection S.H.A.A.Just after bombing Oberndorf, nine Sopwiths of 3 Wing came under attack by German fighters, including Kissenberth and Hilz, who had just replenished their fuel and ammunition. Kissenberth damaged a Sopwith’s engine, but its Canadian pilot, Flight Sub-Lt. Raymond Collishaw, managed to limp back to Luxeuil. Kissenberth then landed at Freiburg, where he was joined by two other aircraft—Hanstein’s Fokker and an enemy bomber. Hanstein had wounded the Sopwith’s Canadian pilot, Flight Sub-Lt. Charles H.S. Butterworth, and forced him to land at a nearby parade field.For the Allies, the worst aerial carnage still lay ahead.While waiting to rendezvous with BM.120’s eight Breguets, N.124’s pilots spotted and engaged four Fokker E.IIIs north of Colmar, with Prince downing one of them. With N.124 guarding their flanks, the bombers flew on, but as they emerged from the Vosges to the southwest, Jasta 15 scrambled up several fighters to intercept.Among them was Lt. Ernst Udet, who disabled a Breguet IV whose crew made a dead-stick landing with all their bombs still on the racks. Udet landed nearby. “Because my tires were punctured by shots,” he wrote, “I turned over, but without serious consequences. It was a comical picture; the vanquished landed upright and the victor landed upside-down. Both Frenchmen clambered down and we shook hands all around.”Having failed to intercept F.29 and F.123, three of Fl.Abt.9b’s Ago C.Is turned west and were making a wide turn near Rosskopf when they ran right into BM.120. The German commander, Lt. Walter Kiliani, and his pilot, Lt. Hans Hartl, joined a Jasta 15 pilot, Lt. Otto Pfälzer, in forcing down a Breguet near Bremgarten. Upon landing nearby, Kiliani was warned off by the French crewmen, who had already set their plane on fire. Shortly afterward, the Breguet’s bombs went off. Hilz, who joined the melee, sent a Breguet down in flames over Umkirch. An Ago C.I engaged another Breguet in a running fight along the length of the Elzacher valley until it ran out of ammunition.N.124 had hardly been idle during the fight. Didier Masson fired 50 rounds at ...

The American Town Where the Dead Outnumber the Living by a Thousand to One - odditycentral (blog)

Monday, October 10, 2016

Colma, a quiet Californian town of roughly two square miles is home to 1,700 living residents and over 1.5 million dead ones. Most of the town’s forever-silent population are people who lived and died in San Francisco, but, just like most of today’s living residents, couldn’t afford to spend their afterlives in the expensive metropolis.In the year 1900, San Francisco was a city crowded by the dead. During the gold rush, gold miners, merchants and immigrants from all around the world  flocked here in search of a better life, bringing with them disease, and as the death toll rose, the 27 cemeteries filled to the brink of overflowing. They were considered a health hazard, but most importantly, they were taking up a large chunk of prime real-estate, so in 1902, the City and the County Board of Supervisors banned further burials in the city and forced larger cemeteries like Laurel Hill and Calvary Cemetry to move their residents outside the city. The fight to keep the dead in their original...