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Holy Cross Mortuary

5835 West Slauson Ave
Culver City, CA 90230
(310) 670-7697
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Culver City CA Obituaries and Death Notices

LA Archdiocese, funeral home operator settle lawsuit over lease of cemeteries - LA Daily News

Monday, December 12, 2016

All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, Calvary Catholic Cemetery in East Los Angeles, Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.In September 1997, the archdiocese and S.E. Funeral Homes agreed to let the plaintiffs lease land for 40 years to operate chapels and funeral homes at the six cemeteries from January 1998 until December 2038, the S.E. Funeral Homes suit states.In September 2014, the archdiocese notified the funeral home company that it was breaking the leases with the reverse merger transaction, according to the S.E. Funeral Homes complaint. Archdiocese attorney Stephen Alexander said previously that the plaintiffs, not his clients, breached the contract.Advertisement“We believe our consent was required for a change in control,” Alexander said previously. “This was a very specific written contract negotiated by the parties.”S.E. Funeral Homes maintained that no such consent was needed if there was an ownership change.“The archdiocese’s claim that (S.E. Funeral Homes) needed the archdiocese’s permission is ridiculous, a fiction much like one a greedy landlord designs to cast out a good tenant in order to raise the rent or to put pressure on a lucrative business deal to sweeten the lease’s financial terms,” its suit alleged.

Vanity Fair's Emmys Social Club Features Emerging Television Talent - Vanity Fair

Monday, September 19, 2016

Saturday designed to capture the dynamic and evolving television landscape, as well as emerging TV platforms like Snapchat and YouTube.The weekend’s events—held at Culver City’s Platform—drew a wide collection of attendees and industry members, convened to take in the packed schedule of events.The morning kicked off with Trisha Yearwood: musician, cookbook author, and host of her own cooking show, Trisha’s Southern Kitchen. We heard from a collection of Internet stars—Joey Graceffa, Kina Grannis, and Quinta Brunson—about YouTube Red, the site’s new subscription-service for online video, and the challenges and benefits of producing a steady stream of viral content; we received help in filling out our Emmy ballots, thanks to a spirited Emmys predictions panel from Vanity Fair’s Hollywood experts; and we also were treated to a discussion with costume designer Lyn Paolo (Scandal, How To Get Away With Murder) about her influences and how she devises looks for her characters.The last of Saturday’s panels featured three up-and-coming television actresses, all of whom are featured in Vanity Fair’s 12 Under 25, our collection of TV stars poised for their breakouts, who were all featured in our October issue: Blackish’s Yara Shahidi, a 16-year-old who made her film debut at age 7 (in Eddie Murphy’s Imagine That); Rowan...

LA Archdiocese, funeral home operator settle lawsuit over lease of cemeteries - The Daily Breeze

Monday, September 12, 2016

All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, Calvary Catholic Cemetery in East Los Angeles, Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.In September 1997, the archdiocese and S.E. Funeral Homes agreed to let the plaintiffs lease land for 40 years to operate chapels and funeral homes at the six cemeteries from January 1998 until December 2038, the S.E. Funeral Homes suit states.In September 2014, the archdiocese notified the funeral home company that it was breaking the leases with the reverse merger transaction, according to the S.E. Funeral Homes complaint. Archdiocese attorney Stephen Alexander said previously that the plaintiffs, not his clients, breached the contract.Advertisement“We believe our consent was required for a change in control,” Alexander said previously. “This was a very specific written contract negotiated by the parties.”S.E. Funeral Homes maintained that no such consent was needed if there was an ownership change.“The archdiocese’s claim that (S.E. Funeral Homes) needed the archdiocese’s permission is ridiculous, a fiction much like one a greedy landlord designs to cast out a good tenant in order to raise the rent or to put pressure on a lucrative business deal to sweeten the lease’s financial terms,” its suit alleged.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles Settles Suit with Funeral Home over Cemetery Lease - Patch.com

Monday, September 05, 2016

All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, Calvary Catholic Cemetery in East Los Angeles, Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.In September 1997, the archdiocese and S.E. Funeral Homes agreed to let the plaintiffs lease land for 40 years to operate chapels and funeral homes at the six cemeteries from January 1998 until December 2038, the S.E. Funeral Homes suit states.In September 2014, the archdiocese notified the funeral home company that it was breaking the leases with the reverse merger transaction, according to the S.E. Funeral Homes complaint. Archdiocese attorney Stephen Alexander said previously that the plaintiffs, not his clients, breached the contract."We believe our consent was required for a change in control," Alexander said previously. "This was a very specific written contract negotiated by the parties."S.E. Funeral Homes maintained that no such consent was needed if there was an ownership change."The archdiocese's claim that (S.E. Funeral Homes) needed the archdiocese's permission is ridiculous, a fiction much like one a greedy landlord designs to cast out a good tenant in order to raise the rent or to put pressure on a lucrative business deal to sweeten the lease's financial terms," its suit alleged.— City News Service, photo via Shutterstock Get free real-time news alerts from the Culver City Patch.

Simon Ramo dies at 103; TRW co-founder shaped California aerospace - Los Angeles Times

Monday, July 11, 2016

His work on military-related programs kept him out of World War II.After World War II, Ramo moved to Hughes Aircraft Co., then Howard Hughes' airplane workshop in Culver City, to launch a division devoted to military electronics.Ramo went to work for Hughes because he knew that one of the richest men in the world at the time was an absentee owner who rarely came around. When he did show up, Ramo recalled in a Los Angeles Times interview, Hughes would “toss off” detailed directions about what kind of seat covers to buy for company-owned Chevrolets.“He was a nut,” Ramo said.Ramo left Hughes in 1953 and formed what became the predecessor for TRW after the Defense Department grew wary about contracting sensitive military work to the eccentric Hughes. That same year, the Eisenhower administration bypassed big defense contractors and asked Ramo and his Caltech classmate Dean Everett Wooldridge, the “W” in TRW, to lead the development of the intercontinental ballistic missile.The enormous task of overseeing the development of the ICBM, a feat Eisenhower considered more complex than building the atomic bomb, had fallen to two young scientists who had been on their own for less than a year and were working out of a former barbershop in Westchester.Eisenhower told them that developing the ICBM was “a research program of the highest national priority, second to no other,” as Ramo remembered the president's words.In doing so, Eisenhower had bypassed corporate giants such as IBM and AT&T to award the nation's largest military technology program to two relative unknowns.It was a controversial move, but inside the Pentagon, Ramo and Wooldridge were seen as the top candidates. At Hughes Aircraft Co., they had developed an electronic fire-control system, used to direct weapons, that became a standard for Air Force fighter aircraft. They had an established record working at the leading edge of the new field of electronic warfare and guidance systems.“Only the president and a few members of Congress knew about it,” Ramo recalled. “The idea was to do things as fast as possible, so we had to bypass bureaucracy.”About the same time, the Pentagon became alarmed by intelligence reports that the Soviets were developing ballistic missiles that could reach the United States. For years, planners had based their strategy on defending against a possible attack by Soviet jets carrying nuclear bombs.Operating in secrecy, Ram...

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LA Archdiocese, funeral home operator settle lawsuit over lease of cemeteries - LA Daily News

Monday, December 12, 2016

All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, Calvary Catholic Cemetery in East Los Angeles, Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.In September 1997, the archdiocese and S.E. Funeral Homes agreed to let the plaintiffs lease land for 40 years to operate chapels and funeral homes at the six cemeteries from January 1998 until December 2038, the S.E. Funeral Homes suit states.In September 2014, the archdiocese notified the funeral home company that it was breaking the leases with the reverse merger transaction, according to the S.E. Funeral Homes complaint. Archdiocese attorney Stephen Alexander said previously that the plaintiffs, not his clients, breached the contract.Advertisement“We believe our consent was required for a change in control,” Alexander said previously. “This was a very specific written contract negotiated by the parties.”S.E. Funeral Homes maintained that no such consent was needed if there was an ownership change.“The archdiocese’s claim that (S.E. Funeral Homes) needed the archdiocese’s permission is ridiculous, a fiction much like one a greedy landlord designs to cast out a good tenant in order to raise the rent or to put pressure on a lucrative business deal to sweeten the lease’s financial terms,” its suit alleged.

Vanity Fair's Emmys Social Club Features Emerging Television Talent - Vanity Fair

Monday, September 19, 2016

Saturday designed to capture the dynamic and evolving television landscape, as well as emerging TV platforms like Snapchat and YouTube.The weekend’s events—held at Culver City’s Platform—drew a wide collection of attendees and industry members, convened to take in the packed schedule of events.The morning kicked off with Trisha Yearwood: musician, cookbook author, and host of her own cooking show, Trisha’s Southern Kitchen. We heard from a collection of Internet stars—Joey Graceffa, Kina Grannis, and Quinta Brunson—about YouTube Red, the site’s new subscription-service for online video, and the challenges and benefits of producing a steady stream of viral content; we received help in filling out our Emmy ballots, thanks to a spirited Emmys predictions panel from Vanity Fair’s Hollywood experts; and we also were treated to a discussion with costume designer Lyn Paolo (Scandal, How To Get Away With Murder) about her influences and how she devises looks for her characters.The last of Saturday’s panels featured three up-and-coming television actresses, all of whom are featured in Vanity Fair’s 12 Under 25, our collection of TV stars poised for their breakouts, who were all featured in our October issue: Blackish’s Yara Shahidi, a 16-year-old who made her film debut at age 7 (in Eddie Murphy’s Imagine That); Rowan...

LA Archdiocese, funeral home operator settle lawsuit over lease of cemeteries - The Daily Breeze

Monday, September 12, 2016

All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, Calvary Catholic Cemetery in East Los Angeles, Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.In September 1997, the archdiocese and S.E. Funeral Homes agreed to let the plaintiffs lease land for 40 years to operate chapels and funeral homes at the six cemeteries from January 1998 until December 2038, the S.E. Funeral Homes suit states.In September 2014, the archdiocese notified the funeral home company that it was breaking the leases with the reverse merger transaction, according to the S.E. Funeral Homes complaint. Archdiocese attorney Stephen Alexander said previously that the plaintiffs, not his clients, breached the contract.Advertisement“We believe our consent was required for a change in control,” Alexander said previously. “This was a very specific written contract negotiated by the parties.”S.E. Funeral Homes maintained that no such consent was needed if there was an ownership change.“The archdiocese’s claim that (S.E. Funeral Homes) needed the archdiocese’s permission is ridiculous, a fiction much like one a greedy landlord designs to cast out a good tenant in order to raise the rent or to put pressure on a lucrative business deal to sweeten the lease’s financial terms,” its suit alleged.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles Settles Suit with Funeral Home over Cemetery Lease - Patch.com

Monday, September 05, 2016

All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, Calvary Catholic Cemetery in East Los Angeles, Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.In September 1997, the archdiocese and S.E. Funeral Homes agreed to let the plaintiffs lease land for 40 years to operate chapels and funeral homes at the six cemeteries from January 1998 until December 2038, the S.E. Funeral Homes suit states.In September 2014, the archdiocese notified the funeral home company that it was breaking the leases with the reverse merger transaction, according to the S.E. Funeral Homes complaint. Archdiocese attorney Stephen Alexander said previously that the plaintiffs, not his clients, breached the contract."We believe our consent was required for a change in control," Alexander said previously. "This was a very specific written contract negotiated by the parties."S.E. Funeral Homes maintained that no such consent was needed if there was an ownership change."The archdiocese's claim that (S.E. Funeral Homes) needed the archdiocese's permission is ridiculous, a fiction much like one a greedy landlord designs to cast out a good tenant in order to raise the rent or to put pressure on a lucrative business deal to sweeten the lease's financial terms," its suit alleged.— City News Service, photo via Shutterstock Get free real-time news alerts from the Culver City Patch.

Simon Ramo dies at 103; TRW co-founder shaped California aerospace - Los Angeles Times

Monday, July 11, 2016

His work on military-related programs kept him out of World War II.After World War II, Ramo moved to Hughes Aircraft Co., then Howard Hughes' airplane workshop in Culver City, to launch a division devoted to military electronics.Ramo went to work for Hughes because he knew that one of the richest men in the world at the time was an absentee owner who rarely came around. When he did show up, Ramo recalled in a Los Angeles Times interview, Hughes would “toss off” detailed directions about what kind of seat covers to buy for company-owned Chevrolets.“He was a nut,” Ramo said.Ramo left Hughes in 1953 and formed what became the predecessor for TRW after the Defense Department grew wary about contracting sensitive military work to the eccentric Hughes. That same year, the Eisenhower administration bypassed big defense contractors and asked Ramo and his Caltech classmate Dean Everett Wooldridge, the “W” in TRW, to lead the development of the intercontinental ballistic missile.The enormous task of overseeing the development of the ICBM, a feat Eisenhower considered more complex than building the atomic bomb, had fallen to two young scientists who had been on their own for less than a year and were working out of a former barbershop in Westchester.Eisenhower told them that developing the ICBM was “a research program of the highest national priority, second to no other,” as Ramo remembered the president's words.In doing so, Eisenhower had bypassed corporate giants such as IBM and AT&T to award the nation's largest military technology program to two relative unknowns.It was a controversial move, but inside the Pentagon, Ramo and Wooldridge were seen as the top candidates. At Hughes Aircraft Co., they had developed an electronic fire-control system, used to direct weapons, that became a standard for Air Force fighter aircraft. They had an established record working at the leading edge of the new field of electronic warfare and guidance systems.“Only the president and a few members of Congress knew about it,” Ramo recalled. “The idea was to do things as fast as possible, so we had to bypass bureaucracy.”About the same time, the Pentagon became alarmed by intelligence reports that the Soviets were developing ballistic missiles that could reach the United States. For years, planners had based their strategy on defending against a possible attack by Soviet jets carrying nuclear bombs.Operating in secrecy, Ram...