La Habra CA Funeral Homes

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Casket Discounters

270 East La Habra Boulevard
La Habra, CA 90631
(562) 691-2333
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Coleman Mortuary

215 North Euclid Street
La Habra, CA 90631
(714) 992-4579
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La Habra CA Obituaries and Death Notices

Obit: Serving La Verne was only half of what Galen and Doris Beery accomplished - Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Monday, November 14, 2016

Joanne Wagoner said Doris Beery had already categorized and written the display’s texts and Galen Beery had completed drawings for the gallery.Galen BeeryGalen was born Nov. 15, 1937, in La Habra, the oldest of La Verne College professor Cleo Beery and his wife Miriam’s three sons. His brothers, Harvey Beery and Quinter Beery, said he was always a role model, even as a child.“When I was younger and disturbed about anything, I’d go to Galen,” Harvey Beery, a retired mechanical engineer living in Placentia, said. “We’d do things together, he’d tell me stories and soon I’d forget what upset me. He was the go-to person for feeling OK.”AdvertisementGalen Beery’s volunteerism began in childhood, Pat Wilson of La Verne said. Starting at age 15, the two were among Brethren teenagers who spent summers volunteering on kitchen and maintenance crews at Camp La Verne, a Brethren recreational retreat in Angelus Oaks.The Brethren nonviolent, peace philosophy prompted the Brethren-raised Galen to become a conscientious objector and join the Brethren Volunteer Service as the Vietnam War loomed. He worked with the International Voluntary Services, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. State Department to help people in Laos and Cambodia build schools and public-health facilities, dig wells and improve rural farming techniques for 10 years, starting in 1959 after graduating from Bonita High School and earning a bachelor’s degree in history from La Verne College.During a leave, he earned a master’s in municipal administration at USC.When Saigon fell in 1975, he became the Church World Service’s Indochinese resettlement program director and went to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where 80,000 refugees fled Vietnam and Laos in overcrowded boats. A December 1979 edition of La Verne Magazine reported he expanded the office from a one-man operation to a staff of six U.S. Embassy officials, 14 Americans and 53 Malaysians and helped resettle 50,000 to America and the remainder to France, Australia, Canada and other countries. He stayed in touch until his death with some expatriates in America and volunteered as an interpreter for Hmong and Laotian families in their legal and business affairs.Chuck Cable, former Hillcrest Homes chief executive officer, appreciated Galen’s volunteerism at the Hillcrest thrift store, his ability to repair donated electronic equipment and his loving regard toward his mother, Miriam Beery, who lived at Hillcrest.“We were all Brethren, La Verne College graduates and former students of Dr. Cleo Beery, his father and a professor who always reached out to students. Galen had the same approach to those he served in Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia and America,” Cable said. “His death was a sudden and shocking loss of a person who’s made so many contributions to so many communities worldwide.”Galen also worked with the International Rescue Committee, Catholic Charities, Church World Service, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Joint Voluntary Agency, an organization of churches and humanitarian groups working with the American Red Cross, according to a National Church of the Brethren newsline.“It’s very clear that Galen’s primary motivation was for Christian service,” said the Rev. Leland Wilson, pastor of La Verne Church of the Brethren from 1969 to 1981. “He was a very faithful person and was individually committed to serve. He was ...

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Obit: Serving La Verne was only half of what Galen and Doris Beery accomplished - Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Monday, November 14, 2016

Joanne Wagoner said Doris Beery had already categorized and written the display’s texts and Galen Beery had completed drawings for the gallery.Galen BeeryGalen was born Nov. 15, 1937, in La Habra, the oldest of La Verne College professor Cleo Beery and his wife Miriam’s three sons. His brothers, Harvey Beery and Quinter Beery, said he was always a role model, even as a child.“When I was younger and disturbed about anything, I’d go to Galen,” Harvey Beery, a retired mechanical engineer living in Placentia, said. “We’d do things together, he’d tell me stories and soon I’d forget what upset me. He was the go-to person for feeling OK.”AdvertisementGalen Beery’s volunteerism began in childhood, Pat Wilson of La Verne said. Starting at age 15, the two were among Brethren teenagers who spent summers volunteering on kitchen and maintenance crews at Camp La Verne, a Brethren recreational retreat in Angelus Oaks.The Brethren nonviolent, peace philosophy prompted the Brethren-raised Galen to become a conscientious objector and join the Brethren Volunteer Service as the Vietnam War loomed. He worked with the International Voluntary Services, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. State Department to help people in Laos and Cambodia build schools and public-health facilities, dig wells and improve rural farming techniques for 10 years, starting in 1959 after graduating from Bonita High School and earning a bachelor’s degree in history from La Verne College.During a leave, he earned a master’s in municipal administration at USC.When Saigon fell in 1975, he became the Church World Service’s Indochinese resettlement program director and went to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where 80,000 refugees fled Vietnam and Laos in overcrowded boats. A December 1979 edition of La Verne Magazine reported he expanded the office from a one-man operation to a staff of six U.S. Embassy officials, 14 Americans and 53 Malaysians and helped resettle 50,000 to America and the remainder to France, Australia, Canada and other countries. He stayed in touch until his death with some expatriates in America and volunteered as an interpreter for Hmong and Laotian families in their legal and business affairs.Chuck Cable, former Hillcrest Homes chief executive officer, appreciated Galen’s volunteerism at the Hillcrest thrift store, his ability to repair donated electronic equipment and his loving regard toward his mother, Miriam Beery, who lived at Hillcrest.“We were all Brethren, La Verne College graduates and former students of Dr. Cleo Beery, his father and a professor who always reached out to students. Galen had the same approach to those he served in Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia and America,” Cable said. “His death was a sudden and shocking loss of a person who’s made so many contributions to so many communities worldwide.”Galen also worked with the International Rescue Committee, Catholic Charities, Church World Service, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Joint Voluntary Agency, an organization of churches and humanitarian groups working with the American Red Cross, according to a National Church of the Brethren newsline.“It’s very clear that Galen’s primary motivation was for Christian service,” said the Rev. Leland Wilson, pastor of La Verne Church of the Brethren from 1969 to 1981. “He was a very faithful person and was individually committed to serve. He was ...