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Carpenter Jensen Mortuary

222 E Street
Needles, CA 92363
(760) 326-2323
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Needles CA Obituaries and Death Notices

Mourners pay respects to Tashii Brown, who died in police custody - Las Vegas Review-Journal

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Kenneth Lopera.Excited to celebrate Mother’s Day with her son, who had moved to the Las Vegas Valley earlier this year, Trinita Farmer was instead notified that her son’s life had been “needlessly taken while in police custody,” Andre Lagomarsino, the family’s attorney, said of Brown’s death.While reporters weren’t permitted at Saturday’s memorial service in Las Vegas, Lagomarsino related one of the touching moments at the service, held before a crowd of mourners at the Davis Funeral Home’s Rainbow Chapel. In the emotional two-minute reading, the family member spoke the tender words Brown had written to Farmer in a Mother’s Day card.A program for Saturday’s service also included his mother’s remembrance of Brown’s life.“He touched the hearts of anyone that would give him five minutes of their time,” she wrote.Call for reform Brown’s death and the use of the chokehold have prompted community outrage, a Strip demonstration and an NAACP petition banning the use of neck restraints by the Metropolitan Police Department. Lopera has been placed on paid administrative leave while Brown’s death is investigated, according to Metro Undersheriff Kevin McMahill.Led by NAACP Las Vegas president Roxann McCoy, the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union Las Vegas chapters have come together in a joint effort to call for reform of the department.An internet petition created by McCoy calls on Metro to join Henderson and North Las Vegas in banning the use of neck restraints by officers. As of Sat...

Bill Walsh, copy editor and witty authority on language, dies at 55 - Washington Post

Monday, March 27, 2017

He also gave up trying to annihilate the word “hopefully” as an adverb.He saw value in Strunk and White’s adages (“omit needless words”) but did not lionize the volume as the infallible word of the grammar gods. He regarded rules as sometimes there to be broken — depending, of course, on the judgment and tolerance of a copy editor. His books were not aimed at writers of Ivy League graduate theses. They were grounded in workaday newspaper usage: Some company names include exclamation points that are not generally used in print, as “it risks sounding way too excited in headlines (Tech Stock Surge Boosts Yahoo!).”A copy editor must at all times exercise vigilance in word choice, he cautioned. A Playboy Bunny is a Playboy Club waitress who has donned a cottontail uniform, he explained, while a Playmate is a centerfold. (The term “Playboy model” should be used gingerly, he wrote, as it could refer to women with the modeling arm of Hugh Hefner’s enterprise, in addition to those who doff their clothing for the magazine.) He rolled his eyes at silly redundancies (“Armed gunmen: They’re the worst kind”) and explained the utility, for a copy editor, of being well read. “Although the people of Pakistan are Pakistanis, the people of Afghanistan are Afghans,” he wrote in “The Elephants of Style.” “The word afghani refers solely to the country’s main unit of currency. To call an Afghan an afghani is like calling an American a dollar.”Mr. Walsh said he tried to steer clear of absolutes in language, but he had his peeves. “The semicolon is an ugly bastard,” he wrote in “Lapsing Into a Comma,” “and thus I try to avoid it.”The hyphen, however, he found beautiful — an instrument of clarity and precision. “Most people don’t understand hyphens, so they lash out against them,” he told American Journalism Review. “I’m a big advocate of the hyphen. If you write ‘the orange juice salesman,’ you have a salesman who’s orange. The orange-juice salesman is more precise.”William Francis Walsh was born in Pottsville, Pa., on Dec. 20, 1961, and completed high school in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa, Ariz. He was a 1984 journalism graduate of the University of Arizona. He worked at the now-defunct Phoenix Gazette and the Washington Times before joining The Post.In 2000, he married Dupree. Besides his wife, of Washington, survivors include his mother and stepfather, Molly Chilinski and Gary Chilinski of Eloy, Ariz.; two brothers, Terence Walsh of Frederick, Md., and Kenneth Walsh of New York City, both copy editors; and a sister, Jennifer Jaurigue of Chandler, Ariz.Mr. Walsh was a frequent presenter at conferences of the American Copy Editors Society, and in 2016 he was a keynote speaker at a gathering of the Editors Association of Canada. The New Yorker’s Norris, the other keynote presenter, recalled that Mr. Walsh “was addressing some nitpicking thing like whether or not to continue to capitalize ‘the Internet.’ The hard-liners still capitalize it (and make two words of ‘Web site,’ with the cap), although the future is clear. The kids will lower-case it, because [and this is pure Bill] what don’t they lower-case? He held out hope for them, though. He showed a slide of a beach chair and a cocktail, the implication being that once we retire — or go to our reward — they can do what they want.”Read more Washington Post obituariesRichard Solomon, Kissinger aide involved in ‘Ping-Pong diplomacy’ with China, dies at 79Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and film historian, dies at 84Joseph Wapner, judge on ‘The People’s Court,’ dies at 97...

Heggestad, Dr. Kay A., M.D. - Madison.com

Monday, January 16, 2017

Female applicants had to do more interviews than males and one professor had even said that all female students should have hysterectomies so that they didn't waste their time raising families. Needless to say, there is less sexism after Kay got finished with them.She was the first female student to graduate from the University of Wisconsin Family Practice Residency. She was the first female Family Practice doctor to deliver babies in Madison and she developed a large practice. She was a confounder of Wildwood Family Clinic with her husband, Paul Wertsch, M.D., and Daniel Barry, M.D. They were soon after joined by Calvin Bruce, M.D.She was a caring, indefatigable Family Doctor and she had a very large obstetrical practice. If she didn't know what was wrong with you, she would not rest until she found out. That's just the type of doctor she was, compassionate, curious, and knowledgeable. If Kay was your doc, you had nothing to worry about. As a patient, however, she was not always easy to get along with, unless, that is, you did what she told you to do. And since she was always right, it was better to do what she told you to do. In fact, her family bought her a T-shirt which said "I know what's best for everyone," and she wore it with pride. She constantly kept up with medical advances and even after she retired, she was the person to go to if you did not know something medically.Even while creating an astounding career, she found time to raise two wonderful kids, Johanna (Larry Kaltenberg) and Gregory (Mark Ferrandino) who later provided her with two wonderful grandchildren, Paulina and Lila. She used her ferocious determination to make the world a better place and to do it with humor. That is definitely a trait she has inspired in all of her surrounding family.She had a part in changing the world. When she found out that her son was gay, she educated herself and became an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. She became active in their local PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) and went on to serve on the National Board of PFLAG. She became a warrior, a true champion for the rights of GLBT people everywhere.Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inboxSign up here to receive a daily email alert of local and national obituariesKay loved to make people laugh, so much so that she took improv classes to improve her skills. She always included jokes in any lectures that she gave and had her family, friends, and doctors constantly...

LPGA Tour Remembers Golf Pioneer Peggy Kirk Bell - LPGA

Monday, December 05, 2016

He was a former college and professional basketball player with the Ft. Wayne Pistons. The dashing, athletic couple came south the year of their marriage and purchased and restored the Pine Needles golf course in Southern Pines. After turning the course into a resort, the Bells began one of the country’s first golf schools, with Mrs. Bell as the featured instructor. The popular schools, known as Golfaris, continue today.Mrs. Bell was a charter member and avid leader of the Ladies Professional Golf Association. An avid pilot, Peggy traveled the early years of the LPGA Tour flying her plane to play in tournaments and promote the LPGA.As an amateur in 1947, she teamed with Babe Zaharias to win the International Four Ball Championship. She was a member of the USGA’s Curtis Cup team in 1950 and turned professional the same year. She signed a promotional contract with Spalding Sporting Goods Co. and played on the first professional Weathervane Team in 1952.Throughout her career as a player, teacher and resort owner, Mrs. Bell was a tireless contributor to the game of golf. For her many outstanding contributions, she was a recipient of numerous prestigious honors and awards, including the USGA’s Bobby Jones award, the Golf Writers Association’s William Richardson Award, the LPGA’s Ellen Griffin Rolex Award. The National Golf Foundation’s Joe Graffis Award, and the National Golf Course Owners Order of Merit.She was a member of seven Halls of Fame, including the Ohio sports, the North Carolina Sports, North Carolina Business, the LPGA teaching division, and the first woman to be inducted to the PGA Golf Instructors Hall of Fame. Three national golf magazines, Golf Digest, Golf and Golf For Women, named her as one of the nation’s best teachers. She was the LPGA Teacher of the Year in 1961, and the PGA’s First Lady of Golf in 2007. She also served on the National Board of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.In addition to Pine Needles Lodge and Country Club, Mrs. Bell and her family became an owner of the Mid Pines Inn and Golf Club in 1994. Both resorts feature classic Donald Ross designed golf courses that date to the mid-1920s. Mrs. Bell was honorary chairperson of three highly successful US Women’s Open Championships that were played at Pine Needles in 1996, 2001 and 2007.She counted among her friends such illustrious sports stars as Babe Zaharias, Patty Berg, Annika Sorenstam, Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus a...

Why we don't mention my great-grandfather's name - High Country News

Monday, November 14, 2016

God silentlythat i am allowed to witness thispray that the cow elkis only at the spruce edge of the foresther large and sleek body somehow broughtinto the safety of a shadowhuman eyes cannot penetratei pray because that is what my abuelitahas taught me to dopray that my being here  this accidentwill not mean the death of this animali dare not touch whatmy touch will doom for having touchedAndrew Abeyta and grandson Adrick during shearing in 2015.Steve Immelas a man i carry this anger  it isuntraceable yet i know my father taught it to mewith his blood with his stories  he lovedall of us enough to teach us not to trusteven so  his eyes have in them the dark well of mercythis vine of flower is watered by fire and it is my lifebeyond the newborn elk c...

Chris Ellis, 7, whose cancer fight drew people together, dies - Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, November 14, 2016

Chris spent much of his time at the University of Chicago’s Comer Children’s Hospital, his days taken up by surgery, chemotherapy, needles, pumps, alarms and painkillers. He underwent operations to remove his gallbladder and adrenal gland. He had a craniotomy to try to eliminate a tumor behind an eye.“Chris never caught a break,” his mother said. “It was one thing after another.”Chris died at home in La Grange Park on Wednesday, less than a month after his seventh birthday.He never even got to go to kindergarten.“He wanted to, but he never got to go to school,” said Dani Ellis, a teacher. “He was very smart. He loved learning, and he loved making friends.”At one point, he developed complications after a stem-cell transplant. Because his immune system had to be suppressed, his mother wouldn’t have been allowed to return to Chris’ room if she left. So she stayed 70 straight days.Meanwhile, Ted Ellis, an engineer, cared for Maria. When Dani Ellis finally returned home, she had to ask her husband, “What do you put in her lunch? What is her morning routine?”Maria always fiercely defended her little brother. After he lost his hair to chemotherapy when she was about 6, she was ready to pounce if someone stared. “She wanted to fight and yell,” their mother said.Chris’s mother kept a journal of his illness on a Facebook page, finding moments of grace during the bleakness.“Chris’ sickness restored my faith in humanity,” she said.

Local candidates weigh in on Heroin crisis facing NH - Eagle-Tribune

Monday, October 24, 2016

I think mandatory jail time for drug dealers is a start, we also have to try to help those that are victims of these illegal drugs. I do not believe the solution is handing out clean needles or Narcan. I believe this only encourages the use of illegal drugs.JOHN O'CONNORContinue to support the commission that was established to review and recommend increases in funding areas such as additional treatment and recovery programs for both opioid and alcohol-related additions. Continue supporting the recently added drug court program that is reporting successful return of users to society. Lastly, strengthen the laws related to punishment for drug dealers who sell opioid and fentanyl or other potentially life-threatening drugs.ROBERT FESHBetter education and parenting is needed first of all. Enforce the laws on sellers to eliminate the source, very important. Drug courts and diversion programs will help for now, but we must provide the resources necessary to beat back the crisis.RICHARD TRIPPFirst, eliminate the drug source, then provide affordable drug rehabilitation.BRIAN CHIRICHIELLOWe need to spend some money to get help for those that want the help. We also need to put dealers behind bars for a long time.PATRICIA DOWLINGWorking with the professionals to secure treatment and aftercare, reviewing penalties currently in place relative to dealers.MARY TILLBeginning in elementary schools, w...

What's up, Oct. 10, 2016 - News-Press Now

Monday, October 10, 2016

For more information, call 816-232-5479.Midtown Neighborhood Watch, 5 to 6 p.m., Bartlett Center, 409 S. 18th St. Monthly meeting open to anyone in midtown area.Hooks and Needles, 6 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Savannah branch, 514 W. Main St., Savannah, Missouri. A program for crafters who knit, crochet and do other fiber arts. Open to all. For more information, call 816-324-4569.St. Joseph Woodworkers Guild, 7 to 9 p.m., 1404 Gardner Lane. After short monthly meeting, Ralph Alvarez will be doing a presentation on freehand routing. Alvarez is an accomplished carver and woodworking instructor at Missouri Western State University. Open to all ages and skill levels.Preschool Storytime, 10 a.m., Rolling Hills Library, Savannah branch, 514 W. Main St., Savannah, Missouri. 10:30 a.m., Belt branch, 1904 N. Belt Highway. Featuring story, finger plays, rhymes and crafts. For more information, call 816-324-4569.Storytime for ages 18 months and older, 10:30 a.m., St. Joseph Public Library, Carnegie branch, 316 Massachusetts St. For more information, call 816-238-0526.Pink Tea Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., YWCA, 304 N. Eighth St. ENCOREplus Breast Cancer Outreach Program is hosting a Pink Tea Luncheon. Come in your best tea party apparel. There will be two breast cancer speakers, honoring of breast cancer survivors and a raffle. Cost is $20 per person. RSVP to Chelsea Teater by calling 816-232-4481.Local History Stage Event, 1 p.m., Joyce Raye Patterson Senior Citizens Center, multipurpose room, 100 S. 10th St. This month’s topic is haunted St. Joseph. Admission is free, and refreshments will be served.Friends of the St. Joseph Public Library book sale, 3 to 9 p.m., East Hills Shopping Center, 3702 Frederick Blvd. There will be about 15,000 items at the sale. Hardcover books are $2 each, paperbacks, $1, DVDs and CDs are $2. For more information, call 816-236-2107.After-school activities, 4:30 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Belt branch, 1904 N. Belt Highway. A program for youth in kindergarten through fifth graders including reading, cooking and hands-on activities. For more information, call 816-232-5479.Adult crafts, 6:30 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Belt branch, 1904 N. Belt Highway. Make a witch decoration using wooden spools. Must register in advance, $5 material fee. For more information, call 816-232-5479.Preschool storytime, 10 a.m., Rolling Hills Library, Savannah branch, 514 W. Main St., Savannah, Missouri. Featuring story, finger plays, rhymes and crafts. For more information, call 816-324-4569.Storytime for ages 3 to 6, 10:30 a.m., St. Joseph Public Library, Downtown branch, 927 Felix St. For more information, call 816-232-3812.Home-schoolers at the library, 1:30 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Belt branch, upper story, 1906A N. Belt Highway. A program series geared toward home-schoolers but open to everyone. For more information, call 816-232-5479.Friends of the St. Joseph Public Library book sale, 3 to 9 p.m., East Hills Shopping Center, 3702 Frederick Blvd. There will be about 15,000 items at the sale. Hardcover books are $2 each, paperbacks, $1, DVDs and CDs are $2. For more information, call 816...

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Mourners pay respects to Tashii Brown, who died in police custody - Las Vegas Review-Journal

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Kenneth Lopera.Excited to celebrate Mother’s Day with her son, who had moved to the Las Vegas Valley earlier this year, Trinita Farmer was instead notified that her son’s life had been “needlessly taken while in police custody,” Andre Lagomarsino, the family’s attorney, said of Brown’s death.While reporters weren’t permitted at Saturday’s memorial service in Las Vegas, Lagomarsino related one of the touching moments at the service, held before a crowd of mourners at the Davis Funeral Home’s Rainbow Chapel. In the emotional two-minute reading, the family member spoke the tender words Brown had written to Farmer in a Mother’s Day card.A program for Saturday’s service also included his mother’s remembrance of Brown’s life.“He touched the hearts of anyone that would give him five minutes of their time,” she wrote.Call for reform Brown’s death and the use of the chokehold have prompted community outrage, a Strip demonstration and an NAACP petition banning the use of neck restraints by the Metropolitan Police Department. Lopera has been placed on paid administrative leave while Brown’s death is investigated, according to Metro Undersheriff Kevin McMahill.Led by NAACP Las Vegas president Roxann McCoy, the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union Las Vegas chapters have come together in a joint effort to call for reform of the department.An internet petition created by McCoy calls on Metro to join Henderson and North Las Vegas in banning the use of neck restraints by officers. As of Sat...

Bill Walsh, copy editor and witty authority on language, dies at 55 - Washington Post

Monday, March 27, 2017

He also gave up trying to annihilate the word “hopefully” as an adverb.He saw value in Strunk and White’s adages (“omit needless words”) but did not lionize the volume as the infallible word of the grammar gods. He regarded rules as sometimes there to be broken — depending, of course, on the judgment and tolerance of a copy editor. His books were not aimed at writers of Ivy League graduate theses. They were grounded in workaday newspaper usage: Some company names include exclamation points that are not generally used in print, as “it risks sounding way too excited in headlines (Tech Stock Surge Boosts Yahoo!).”A copy editor must at all times exercise vigilance in word choice, he cautioned. A Playboy Bunny is a Playboy Club waitress who has donned a cottontail uniform, he explained, while a Playmate is a centerfold. (The term “Playboy model” should be used gingerly, he wrote, as it could refer to women with the modeling arm of Hugh Hefner’s enterprise, in addition to those who doff their clothing for the magazine.) He rolled his eyes at silly redundancies (“Armed gunmen: They’re the worst kind”) and explained the utility, for a copy editor, of being well read. “Although the people of Pakistan are Pakistanis, the people of Afghanistan are Afghans,” he wrote in “The Elephants of Style.” “The word afghani refers solely to the country’s main unit of currency. To call an Afghan an afghani is like calling an American a dollar.”Mr. Walsh said he tried to steer clear of absolutes in language, but he had his peeves. “The semicolon is an ugly bastard,” he wrote in “Lapsing Into a Comma,” “and thus I try to avoid it.”The hyphen, however, he found beautiful — an instrument of clarity and precision. “Most people don’t understand hyphens, so they lash out against them,” he told American Journalism Review. “I’m a big advocate of the hyphen. If you write ‘the orange juice salesman,’ you have a salesman who’s orange. The orange-juice salesman is more precise.”William Francis Walsh was born in Pottsville, Pa., on Dec. 20, 1961, and completed high school in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa, Ariz. He was a 1984 journalism graduate of the University of Arizona. He worked at the now-defunct Phoenix Gazette and the Washington Times before joining The Post.In 2000, he married Dupree. Besides his wife, of Washington, survivors include his mother and stepfather, Molly Chilinski and Gary Chilinski of Eloy, Ariz.; two brothers, Terence Walsh of Frederick, Md., and Kenneth Walsh of New York City, both copy editors; and a sister, Jennifer Jaurigue of Chandler, Ariz.Mr. Walsh was a frequent presenter at conferences of the American Copy Editors Society, and in 2016 he was a keynote speaker at a gathering of the Editors Association of Canada. The New Yorker’s Norris, the other keynote presenter, recalled that Mr. Walsh “was addressing some nitpicking thing like whether or not to continue to capitalize ‘the Internet.’ The hard-liners still capitalize it (and make two words of ‘Web site,’ with the cap), although the future is clear. The kids will lower-case it, because [and this is pure Bill] what don’t they lower-case? He held out hope for them, though. He showed a slide of a beach chair and a cocktail, the implication being that once we retire — or go to our reward — they can do what they want.”Read more Washington Post obituariesRichard Solomon, Kissinger aide involved in ‘Ping-Pong diplomacy’ with China, dies at 79Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and film historian, dies at 84Joseph Wapner, judge on ‘The People’s Court,’ dies at 97...

Heggestad, Dr. Kay A., M.D. - Madison.com

Monday, January 16, 2017

Female applicants had to do more interviews than males and one professor had even said that all female students should have hysterectomies so that they didn't waste their time raising families. Needless to say, there is less sexism after Kay got finished with them.She was the first female student to graduate from the University of Wisconsin Family Practice Residency. She was the first female Family Practice doctor to deliver babies in Madison and she developed a large practice. She was a confounder of Wildwood Family Clinic with her husband, Paul Wertsch, M.D., and Daniel Barry, M.D. They were soon after joined by Calvin Bruce, M.D.She was a caring, indefatigable Family Doctor and she had a very large obstetrical practice. If she didn't know what was wrong with you, she would not rest until she found out. That's just the type of doctor she was, compassionate, curious, and knowledgeable. If Kay was your doc, you had nothing to worry about. As a patient, however, she was not always easy to get along with, unless, that is, you did what she told you to do. And since she was always right, it was better to do what she told you to do. In fact, her family bought her a T-shirt which said "I know what's best for everyone," and she wore it with pride. She constantly kept up with medical advances and even after she retired, she was the person to go to if you did not know something medically.Even while creating an astounding career, she found time to raise two wonderful kids, Johanna (Larry Kaltenberg) and Gregory (Mark Ferrandino) who later provided her with two wonderful grandchildren, Paulina and Lila. She used her ferocious determination to make the world a better place and to do it with humor. That is definitely a trait she has inspired in all of her surrounding family.She had a part in changing the world. When she found out that her son was gay, she educated herself and became an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. She became active in their local PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) and went on to serve on the National Board of PFLAG. She became a warrior, a true champion for the rights of GLBT people everywhere.Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inboxSign up here to receive a daily email alert of local and national obituariesKay loved to make people laugh, so much so that she took improv classes to improve her skills. She always included jokes in any lectures that she gave and had her family, friends, and doctors constantly...

LPGA Tour Remembers Golf Pioneer Peggy Kirk Bell - LPGA

Monday, December 05, 2016

He was a former college and professional basketball player with the Ft. Wayne Pistons. The dashing, athletic couple came south the year of their marriage and purchased and restored the Pine Needles golf course in Southern Pines. After turning the course into a resort, the Bells began one of the country’s first golf schools, with Mrs. Bell as the featured instructor. The popular schools, known as Golfaris, continue today.Mrs. Bell was a charter member and avid leader of the Ladies Professional Golf Association. An avid pilot, Peggy traveled the early years of the LPGA Tour flying her plane to play in tournaments and promote the LPGA.As an amateur in 1947, she teamed with Babe Zaharias to win the International Four Ball Championship. She was a member of the USGA’s Curtis Cup team in 1950 and turned professional the same year. She signed a promotional contract with Spalding Sporting Goods Co. and played on the first professional Weathervane Team in 1952.Throughout her career as a player, teacher and resort owner, Mrs. Bell was a tireless contributor to the game of golf. For her many outstanding contributions, she was a recipient of numerous prestigious honors and awards, including the USGA’s Bobby Jones award, the Golf Writers Association’s William Richardson Award, the LPGA’s Ellen Griffin Rolex Award. The National Golf Foundation’s Joe Graffis Award, and the National Golf Course Owners Order of Merit.She was a member of seven Halls of Fame, including the Ohio sports, the North Carolina Sports, North Carolina Business, the LPGA teaching division, and the first woman to be inducted to the PGA Golf Instructors Hall of Fame. Three national golf magazines, Golf Digest, Golf and Golf For Women, named her as one of the nation’s best teachers. She was the LPGA Teacher of the Year in 1961, and the PGA’s First Lady of Golf in 2007. She also served on the National Board of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.In addition to Pine Needles Lodge and Country Club, Mrs. Bell and her family became an owner of the Mid Pines Inn and Golf Club in 1994. Both resorts feature classic Donald Ross designed golf courses that date to the mid-1920s. Mrs. Bell was honorary chairperson of three highly successful US Women’s Open Championships that were played at Pine Needles in 1996, 2001 and 2007.She counted among her friends such illustrious sports stars as Babe Zaharias, Patty Berg, Annika Sorenstam, Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus a...

Why we don't mention my great-grandfather's name - High Country News

Monday, November 14, 2016

God silentlythat i am allowed to witness thispray that the cow elkis only at the spruce edge of the foresther large and sleek body somehow broughtinto the safety of a shadowhuman eyes cannot penetratei pray because that is what my abuelitahas taught me to dopray that my being here  this accidentwill not mean the death of this animali dare not touch whatmy touch will doom for having touchedAndrew Abeyta and grandson Adrick during shearing in 2015.Steve Immelas a man i carry this anger  it isuntraceable yet i know my father taught it to mewith his blood with his stories  he lovedall of us enough to teach us not to trusteven so  his eyes have in them the dark well of mercythis vine of flower is watered by fire and it is my lifebeyond the newborn elk c...

Chris Ellis, 7, whose cancer fight drew people together, dies - Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, November 14, 2016

Chris spent much of his time at the University of Chicago’s Comer Children’s Hospital, his days taken up by surgery, chemotherapy, needles, pumps, alarms and painkillers. He underwent operations to remove his gallbladder and adrenal gland. He had a craniotomy to try to eliminate a tumor behind an eye.“Chris never caught a break,” his mother said. “It was one thing after another.”Chris died at home in La Grange Park on Wednesday, less than a month after his seventh birthday.He never even got to go to kindergarten.“He wanted to, but he never got to go to school,” said Dani Ellis, a teacher. “He was very smart. He loved learning, and he loved making friends.”At one point, he developed complications after a stem-cell transplant. Because his immune system had to be suppressed, his mother wouldn’t have been allowed to return to Chris’ room if she left. So she stayed 70 straight days.Meanwhile, Ted Ellis, an engineer, cared for Maria. When Dani Ellis finally returned home, she had to ask her husband, “What do you put in her lunch? What is her morning routine?”Maria always fiercely defended her little brother. After he lost his hair to chemotherapy when she was about 6, she was ready to pounce if someone stared. “She wanted to fight and yell,” their mother said.Chris’s mother kept a journal of his illness on a Facebook page, finding moments of grace during the bleakness.“Chris’ sickness restored my faith in humanity,” she said.

Local candidates weigh in on Heroin crisis facing NH - Eagle-Tribune

Monday, October 24, 2016

I think mandatory jail time for drug dealers is a start, we also have to try to help those that are victims of these illegal drugs. I do not believe the solution is handing out clean needles or Narcan. I believe this only encourages the use of illegal drugs.JOHN O'CONNORContinue to support the commission that was established to review and recommend increases in funding areas such as additional treatment and recovery programs for both opioid and alcohol-related additions. Continue supporting the recently added drug court program that is reporting successful return of users to society. Lastly, strengthen the laws related to punishment for drug dealers who sell opioid and fentanyl or other potentially life-threatening drugs.ROBERT FESHBetter education and parenting is needed first of all. Enforce the laws on sellers to eliminate the source, very important. Drug courts and diversion programs will help for now, but we must provide the resources necessary to beat back the crisis.RICHARD TRIPPFirst, eliminate the drug source, then provide affordable drug rehabilitation.BRIAN CHIRICHIELLOWe need to spend some money to get help for those that want the help. We also need to put dealers behind bars for a long time.PATRICIA DOWLINGWorking with the professionals to secure treatment and aftercare, reviewing penalties currently in place relative to dealers.MARY TILLBeginning in elementary schools, w...

What's up, Oct. 10, 2016 - News-Press Now

Monday, October 10, 2016

For more information, call 816-232-5479.Midtown Neighborhood Watch, 5 to 6 p.m., Bartlett Center, 409 S. 18th St. Monthly meeting open to anyone in midtown area.Hooks and Needles, 6 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Savannah branch, 514 W. Main St., Savannah, Missouri. A program for crafters who knit, crochet and do other fiber arts. Open to all. For more information, call 816-324-4569.St. Joseph Woodworkers Guild, 7 to 9 p.m., 1404 Gardner Lane. After short monthly meeting, Ralph Alvarez will be doing a presentation on freehand routing. Alvarez is an accomplished carver and woodworking instructor at Missouri Western State University. Open to all ages and skill levels.Preschool Storytime, 10 a.m., Rolling Hills Library, Savannah branch, 514 W. Main St., Savannah, Missouri. 10:30 a.m., Belt branch, 1904 N. Belt Highway. Featuring story, finger plays, rhymes and crafts. For more information, call 816-324-4569.Storytime for ages 18 months and older, 10:30 a.m., St. Joseph Public Library, Carnegie branch, 316 Massachusetts St. For more information, call 816-238-0526.Pink Tea Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., YWCA, 304 N. Eighth St. ENCOREplus Breast Cancer Outreach Program is hosting a Pink Tea Luncheon. Come in your best tea party apparel. There will be two breast cancer speakers, honoring of breast cancer survivors and a raffle. Cost is $20 per person. RSVP to Chelsea Teater by calling 816-232-4481.Local History Stage Event, 1 p.m., Joyce Raye Patterson Senior Citizens Center, multipurpose room, 100 S. 10th St. This month’s topic is haunted St. Joseph. Admission is free, and refreshments will be served.Friends of the St. Joseph Public Library book sale, 3 to 9 p.m., East Hills Shopping Center, 3702 Frederick Blvd. There will be about 15,000 items at the sale. Hardcover books are $2 each, paperbacks, $1, DVDs and CDs are $2. For more information, call 816-236-2107.After-school activities, 4:30 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Belt branch, 1904 N. Belt Highway. A program for youth in kindergarten through fifth graders including reading, cooking and hands-on activities. For more information, call 816-232-5479.Adult crafts, 6:30 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Belt branch, 1904 N. Belt Highway. Make a witch decoration using wooden spools. Must register in advance, $5 material fee. For more information, call 816-232-5479.Preschool storytime, 10 a.m., Rolling Hills Library, Savannah branch, 514 W. Main St., Savannah, Missouri. Featuring story, finger plays, rhymes and crafts. For more information, call 816-324-4569.Storytime for ages 3 to 6, 10:30 a.m., St. Joseph Public Library, Downtown branch, 927 Felix St. For more information, call 816-232-3812.Home-schoolers at the library, 1:30 p.m., Rolling Hills Library, Belt branch, upper story, 1906A N. Belt Highway. A program series geared toward home-schoolers but open to everyone. For more information, call 816-232-5479.Friends of the St. Joseph Public Library book sale, 3 to 9 p.m., East Hills Shopping Center, 3702 Frederick Blvd. There will be about 15,000 items at the sale. Hardcover books are $2 each, paperbacks, $1, DVDs and CDs are $2. For more information, call 816...