Redondo Beach CA Funeral Homes

Redondo Beach CA funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Ashes at Sea , John M Harris Co Cemetery and Funeral Consultants by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Redondo Beach funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Ashes at Sea

Po Box 161
Redondo Beach, CA h, CA
(310) 372-7211
Ashes at Sea funeral flowers

John M Harris Co Cemetery and Funeral Consultants

226 S. Lucia Ave. Suite #1
Redondo Beach, CA 90277
(877) 723-5677
John M Harris Co Cemetery and Funeral Consultants funeral flowers

Redondo Beach CA Obituaries and Death Notices

June 9, 2017 - WJHnews

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Chris), of Jesup, Jamie Ray (husband Michael), of Waycross, Bryon Lynn (wife Tracy), of Thomasville, and Trevis Guy (wife Leslie), of Waverly, 13 grandchildren, a sister, Betty Lynn Bobbitt, of Redondo Beach, Calif., and nieces, nephews and other relatives.Memorial donations may be made in his memory to Calvary Baptist Church, 1622 Gibbs St., Waycross, Ga. 31503.A funeral will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday in the Music Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will be in Oakland Cemetery.Members of the Senior Men’s Sunday School class of Calvary Baptist Church are asked to gather at the chapel at 2:30 p.m. Sunday to serve as honorary pallbearers.The family will receive friends from 6 until 8 p.m. Saturday at Music Funeral Home.Sympathy may be expressed by signing the online registry at www.musicfuneralhome.com.Music Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.Floyd Eugene JenkinsFloyd Eugene Jenkins, 59, passed away early Thursday morning (June 1, 2017) after battling a long-term illness.He was born Dec. 6, 1957 to the late Deacon and Deaconess Frank and Lorene Jenkins. He accepted the Lord at an early age and joined St. James Missionary Baptist Church under the leadership of the Rev. James M. Butler.He received his early education at Pierce County Training School in Patterson. After moving to Waycross, he completed his education at Waycross High School with the graduating class of 1977. He furthered his education at ATI in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., with a diploma in heating and air conditioning.He leaves to mourn his passing, the mother of his children, Neddra Price; three children, Floyd Jenkins Jr., Andre’ Price, Nedra Brown; five grandchildren; a special friend and faithful companion, Linda Bryant; seven siblings to cherish his memory, Cora Bailey, Anne, Janice, Constance Muhammad (Wilbert), Garrison, Leonard and Carlton Jenkins; special nieces, Rachelle, Kiaa, Bette, Amani and Fatima, who provided love and care for him; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.The family offers a very special thanks to Leonard Jenkins, Ann Robertson, Ricky Bell and Hospice, who provided him with love, care, respect and compassion.Friends are being recei...

Giving the grieving a break: Online disclosure of funeral costs in South Bay helps avoid gouging - The Daily Breeze

Monday, March 27, 2017

The choice was easy for John Kirk, president of White & Day, which today runs four mortuaries in Torrance, Redondo Beach, Gardena and Inglewood.“We’ve put our prices online for a very long time, since the beginning,” he said. “We just figured there’s no reason to frustrate people who are looking for information.”That may seem like a no-brainer, but nationwide, many — if not most — funeral homes refuse to disclose prices on their websites.A report last week from the Consumer Federation of America and the Funeral Consumers Alliance criticized “the industry’s intractable stance on price transparency,” adding, “it is past time for funeral homes to join the 21st century and post their prices on their websites as nearly every other retail service sector does voluntarily.”The two nonprofit groups called on the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which is set to revise its funeral rules next year, to require online cost posting.“Funerals are not elective activities — everybody dies,” the groups noted in a 2016 petition to the FTC. “Between now and 2019, consumers will likely spend at least $50 billion on funeral services.”A consumer winIn 1984, under President Ronald Reagan, the FTC issued new rules after investigations found many of the nation’s 22,...

Days before her death, wrestling star and actress Chyna posted a rambling YouTube video - Los Angeles Times

Monday, September 19, 2016

The wrestling star and actress known as Chyna was found dead Wednesday in her Redondo Beach home, three days after posting a rambling and sometimes incoherent video on YouTube.In the 13-minute video posted to her YouTube channel on Sunday, a groggy Chyna, whose real name was Joan Marie Laurer, walks around a beach-side residence talking to herself. She wears headphones and feathers in her hair and speaks in slurred language as she makes herself a smoothie and talks about the vitamins she’s taking. “So passive aggressive,” Chyna says after looking through the refrigerator. “I’m like just rude lately. But doing good. I’m having fun because I feel like I can express myself.”Join the conversation on Facebook >> Redondo Beach police said officers found Chyna, 46, in her apartment on Wednesday afternoon, dead on her bed, after receiving a call from her friend about a woman not breathing. The friend said Chyna had not answered her phone in a few days, the police department said in a statement.Ed Winter, a spokesman for the ...

Simon Ramo dies at 103; TRW co-founder shaped California aerospace - Los Angeles Times

Monday, July 11, 2016

Ramo, much of the nation's military and civil spacecraft development work remains centered in Southern California, notably along the coastline from El Segundo and Redondo Beach to Long Beach, Seal Beach and Huntington Beach.As the consolidation of the defense industry in the 1990s led firms to take their manufacturing elsewhere, Ramo worked to keep the research laboratories and their engineering know-how in the region.But Ramo was best known for leading the development of the weapon that escalated the Cold War into a potentially apocalyptic struggle. It was a rocket that could deliver a nuclear warhead to a target 6,000 miles away in 30 minutes and destroy a city, undeterred by any defensive system.The former Soviet Union and the United States built so many of the missiles that at one point, scientists estimated that the world could be destroyed 10 times over. As a result, it fundamentally altered war planning and the worldview of two generations, who learned to live with Cold War brinkmanship and the deeply troubling concept known as “mutually assured destruction.” As long as there were enough nuclear missiles to destroy one another, it was considered irrational for one side to launch an attack, or at least that was the thinking behind it.Ramo was born in Salt Lake City on May 7, 1913, to Lithuanian immigrant parents who owned a clothing store. He was an aspiring concert volinist, until age 12, when he heard legendary violinist Jascha Heifetz and decided he would be better off pursuing a career in science.Ramo and Heifetz became friends years later and once played a duet together at a dinner party. “I could then confidently conclude that I had made the right decision,” Ramo wrote in his 1988 semi-autobiography, “The Business of Science.”With the focus on science, Ramo earned a doctorate in electrical engineering and physics from Caltech at age 23. In 1936, he began working for General Electric Co., where he helped develop the electron microscope. His work on military-related programs kept him out of World War II.After World War II, Ramo moved to Hughes Aircraft Co., then Howard Hughes' airplane workshop in Culver City, to launch a division devoted to military electronics.Ramo went to work for Hughes because he knew that one of the richest men in the world at the time was an absentee owner who rarely came around. When he did show up, Ramo recalled in a Los Angeles Times interview, Hughes would “toss off” detailed directions about what kind of seat covers to buy for company-owned Chevrolets.“He was a nut,” Ramo said.Ramo left Hughes in 1953 and formed what became the predecessor for TRW after the Defense Department grew wary about contracting sensitive military work to the eccentric Hughes. That same year, the Eisenhower administration bypassed big defense contractors and asked Ramo and his Caltech classmate Dean Everett Wooldridge, the “W” in TRW, to lead the development of the intercontinental ballistic missile.The enormous task of overseeing the development of the ICBM, a feat Eisenhower...

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Redondo Beach News

June 9, 2017 - WJHnews

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Chris), of Jesup, Jamie Ray (husband Michael), of Waycross, Bryon Lynn (wife Tracy), of Thomasville, and Trevis Guy (wife Leslie), of Waverly, 13 grandchildren, a sister, Betty Lynn Bobbitt, of Redondo Beach, Calif., and nieces, nephews and other relatives.Memorial donations may be made in his memory to Calvary Baptist Church, 1622 Gibbs St., Waycross, Ga. 31503.A funeral will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday in the Music Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will be in Oakland Cemetery.Members of the Senior Men’s Sunday School class of Calvary Baptist Church are asked to gather at the chapel at 2:30 p.m. Sunday to serve as honorary pallbearers.The family will receive friends from 6 until 8 p.m. Saturday at Music Funeral Home.Sympathy may be expressed by signing the online registry at www.musicfuneralhome.com.Music Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.Floyd Eugene JenkinsFloyd Eugene Jenkins, 59, passed away early Thursday morning (June 1, 2017) after battling a long-term illness.He was born Dec. 6, 1957 to the late Deacon and Deaconess Frank and Lorene Jenkins. He accepted the Lord at an early age and joined St. James Missionary Baptist Church under the leadership of the Rev. James M. Butler.He received his early education at Pierce County Training School in Patterson. After moving to Waycross, he completed his education at Waycross High School with the graduating class of 1977. He furthered his education at ATI in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., with a diploma in heating and air conditioning.He leaves to mourn his passing, the mother of his children, Neddra Price; three children, Floyd Jenkins Jr., Andre’ Price, Nedra Brown; five grandchildren; a special friend and faithful companion, Linda Bryant; seven siblings to cherish his memory, Cora Bailey, Anne, Janice, Constance Muhammad (Wilbert), Garrison, Leonard and Carlton Jenkins; special nieces, Rachelle, Kiaa, Bette, Amani and Fatima, who provided love and care for him; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.The family offers a very special thanks to Leonard Jenkins, Ann Robertson, Ricky Bell and Hospice, who provided him with love, care, respect and compassion.Friends are being recei...

Giving the grieving a break: Online disclosure of funeral costs in South Bay helps avoid gouging - The Daily Breeze

Monday, March 27, 2017

The choice was easy for John Kirk, president of White & Day, which today runs four mortuaries in Torrance, Redondo Beach, Gardena and Inglewood.“We’ve put our prices online for a very long time, since the beginning,” he said. “We just figured there’s no reason to frustrate people who are looking for information.”That may seem like a no-brainer, but nationwide, many — if not most — funeral homes refuse to disclose prices on their websites.A report last week from the Consumer Federation of America and the Funeral Consumers Alliance criticized “the industry’s intractable stance on price transparency,” adding, “it is past time for funeral homes to join the 21st century and post their prices on their websites as nearly every other retail service sector does voluntarily.”The two nonprofit groups called on the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which is set to revise its funeral rules next year, to require online cost posting.“Funerals are not elective activities — everybody dies,” the groups noted in a 2016 petition to the FTC. “Between now and 2019, consumers will likely spend at least $50 billion on funeral services.”A consumer winIn 1984, under President Ronald Reagan, the FTC issued new rules after investigations found many of the nation’s 22,...

Days before her death, wrestling star and actress Chyna posted a rambling YouTube video - Los Angeles Times

Monday, September 19, 2016

The wrestling star and actress known as Chyna was found dead Wednesday in her Redondo Beach home, three days after posting a rambling and sometimes incoherent video on YouTube.In the 13-minute video posted to her YouTube channel on Sunday, a groggy Chyna, whose real name was Joan Marie Laurer, walks around a beach-side residence talking to herself. She wears headphones and feathers in her hair and speaks in slurred language as she makes herself a smoothie and talks about the vitamins she’s taking. “So passive aggressive,” Chyna says after looking through the refrigerator. “I’m like just rude lately. But doing good. I’m having fun because I feel like I can express myself.”Join the conversation on Facebook >> Redondo Beach police said officers found Chyna, 46, in her apartment on Wednesday afternoon, dead on her bed, after receiving a call from her friend about a woman not breathing. The friend said Chyna had not answered her phone in a few days, the police department said in a statement.Ed Winter, a spokesman for the ...

Simon Ramo dies at 103; TRW co-founder shaped California aerospace - Los Angeles Times

Monday, July 11, 2016

Ramo, much of the nation's military and civil spacecraft development work remains centered in Southern California, notably along the coastline from El Segundo and Redondo Beach to Long Beach, Seal Beach and Huntington Beach.As the consolidation of the defense industry in the 1990s led firms to take their manufacturing elsewhere, Ramo worked to keep the research laboratories and their engineering know-how in the region.But Ramo was best known for leading the development of the weapon that escalated the Cold War into a potentially apocalyptic struggle. It was a rocket that could deliver a nuclear warhead to a target 6,000 miles away in 30 minutes and destroy a city, undeterred by any defensive system.The former Soviet Union and the United States built so many of the missiles that at one point, scientists estimated that the world could be destroyed 10 times over. As a result, it fundamentally altered war planning and the worldview of two generations, who learned to live with Cold War brinkmanship and the deeply troubling concept known as “mutually assured destruction.” As long as there were enough nuclear missiles to destroy one another, it was considered irrational for one side to launch an attack, or at least that was the thinking behind it.Ramo was born in Salt Lake City on May 7, 1913, to Lithuanian immigrant parents who owned a clothing store. He was an aspiring concert volinist, until age 12, when he heard legendary violinist Jascha Heifetz and decided he would be better off pursuing a career in science.Ramo and Heifetz became friends years later and once played a duet together at a dinner party. “I could then confidently conclude that I had made the right decision,” Ramo wrote in his 1988 semi-autobiography, “The Business of Science.”With the focus on science, Ramo earned a doctorate in electrical engineering and physics from Caltech at age 23. In 1936, he began working for General Electric Co., where he helped develop the electron microscope. His work on military-related programs kept him out of World War II.After World War II, Ramo moved to Hughes Aircraft Co., then Howard Hughes' airplane workshop in Culver City, to launch a division devoted to military electronics.Ramo went to work for Hughes because he knew that one of the richest men in the world at the time was an absentee owner who rarely came around. When he did show up, Ramo recalled in a Los Angeles Times interview, Hughes would “toss off” detailed directions about what kind of seat covers to buy for company-owned Chevrolets.“He was a nut,” Ramo said.Ramo left Hughes in 1953 and formed what became the predecessor for TRW after the Defense Department grew wary about contracting sensitive military work to the eccentric Hughes. That same year, the Eisenhower administration bypassed big defense contractors and asked Ramo and his Caltech classmate Dean Everett Wooldridge, the “W” in TRW, to lead the development of the intercontinental ballistic missile.The enormous task of overseeing the development of the ICBM, a feat Eisenhower...