San Bernardino CA Funeral Homes

San Bernardino CA funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Aaron Cremation Services , Bobbitt Memorial Chapel by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any San Bernardino funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Aaron Cremation Services

1525 North Waterman Avenue
San Bernardino, CA 92404
(909) 388-1030
Aaron Cremation Services funeral flowers

Bobbitt Memorial Chapel

1299 East Highland Avenue
San Bernardino, CA 92404
(909) 882-6339
Bobbitt Memorial Chapel funeral flowers

Doran and Mowry LLC

1255 East Highland Avenue Suite 104
San Bernardino, CA 92404
(909) 883-0234
Doran and Mowry LLC funeral flowers

Filanc Richard L Funeral Director

1525 North Waterman Avenue
San Bernardino, CA 92404
(909) 889-0173
Filanc Richard L Funeral Director funeral flowers

Final Tribute Funeral Services

824 East Highland Avenue
San Bernardino, CA 92404
(909) 883-5288
Final Tribute Funeral Services funeral flowers

Preciado Funeral Home

923 W. Mill Street
San Bernardino, CA 92410
(909) 383-1108
Preciado Funeral Home funeral flowers

San Bernardino CA Obituaries and Death Notices

SIMPSON FAMILY MORTUARY LICENSE REVOKED - Lasentinel

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Family Mortuary from continuing business as the company is referring potential customers to its Long Beach location through radio advertisements.Simpson Mortuary also is licensed in Los Angeles and San Bernardino.The mortuary, under the direction of Curtis Simpson Sr., Derrick Sherrod King and Sonya Latrese Simpson has been levied with numerous complaints from the State Attorney General and most recently in 2013 when the mortuary conducted a service with the wrong remains in the casket.In that case, Simpson Family Mortuary was cited with misrepresentation or fraud, gross negligence, gross incompetence or unprofessional conduct. Calls to Simpson Family Mortuary are forwarded to its Long Beach location.A woman answered the phone and explained that the Inglewood location was under renovation and will be reopened in about six months.Then after a long pause, another woman identified as Ms. Starks said that the company is not doing business in Inglewood that it is “Closed.”Individuals should contact the Department of Consumer Affairs and the Cemetery and Funeral Bureau before proceeding with any business at Simpson family Mortuary.

If pot is legalized, where would the new tax… - The Mercury News

Monday, September 19, 2016

In 2015, the state took in $58 million in sales tax revenue from some 974 registered dispensaries, including nearly 400 in Los Angeles County and 70 to 80 each in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, according to Board of Equalization data.That revenue is on track to nearly double this year.Under Prop. 64, all marijuana sales would be taxed an additional 15 percent starting Jan. 1, 2018, on top of levies on regulated growers of $9.25 per ounce for dry flowers or $2.75 per ounce for leaves. Medical cannabis patients would be exempt from the state sales tax.The independent Legislative Analyst’s Office predicts Prop. 64 state tax revenues would total from the high hundreds of millions of dollars to more than $1 billion each year.That’s less than 1 percent of the state’s annual budget, or about what California brings in annually now from taxes on tobacco products.Keith Humphreys, a Stanford University professor who served on a state commission that studied approaches for legalizing marijuana, summed up the financial impact of Prop. 64 this way: “It’s not going to make us if we do, and it’s not going to break us if we don’t.”Tax revenue from legalized weed would first be used to cover “all reasonable costs” incurred by the state to administer and enforce the recreational cannabis regulations, according to the ballot measure.The Department of Consumer Affairs, which would oversee the new marijuana marketplace if Prop. 64 passes, doesn’t have an estimate yet of those administrative costs, according to spokeswoman Veronica Harms.The much smaller states of Oregon and Washington spend about $6 million and $8 million a year, respectively, on their medical and recreational programs.Colorado, which has the oldest and most robust recreational marijuana market in the nation, is budgeted to spend $16.3 million regulating legal marijuana this fiscal year, according to Robert Goulding, spokesman for the Colorado Department of Revenue.The program “pays it own way,” Goulding noted, with industry taxes, licenses and fees covering administrative costs while helping fund such things as school construction, youth education programs and poison control centers.Still, Prop. 64 opponents, including Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens, say they’re concerned that tax revenue from legal marijuana sales won’t cover harder-to-quantify effects on public safety and health issues.WHAT ABOUT LOCAL BENEFITS?One statewide Colorado levy on pot provides cities with money to use as they choose. That allowed Denver to add $29 million to its general fund budget in 2015, the Denver Post reports.While Prop. 64 doesn’t provide new, dedicated revenue directly to cities and counties, proponents say there are still ways local governments can benefit from the measure.California cities that permit recreational marijuana businesses could increase income from sales taxes.There also would be opportunities for governments, schools, public safety agencies and nonprofits in cities that welcome the cannabis industry to compete for hundreds of millions a year in grants that will fund substance abuse programs, offset enforcement costs and more.Opponents of legalized pot argue all law enforcement agencies should be eligible for such grants, because the ballot measure would permit cultivation and personal consumption of marijuana at residences across the state.“They’re still going to have to deal with the problems of home grows and use, but there’s no money available to them,” said Andrew Acosta, spokesman for the No on 64 campaign.Kinney called such criticisms “disingenuous.” He pointed to a Legislative Analyst’s Office estimate that the state will save tens of millions of dollars each year in criminal justice costs if marijuana is legal.The measure also says cities and counties can ask voters to approve extra local taxes on cannabis.At least 18...

New York police seeking killer of imam, assistant - DunyaNews Pakistan

Monday, August 15, 2016

Awad.CAIR plans to hold a funeral prayer service for the slain men on Monday.Last year, hate crimes against Muslims and mosques tripled across the country following extremist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, California, according to The New York Times. ...

Charles Cullen Barton - Burnet Bulletin

Monday, August 01, 2016

Deacon Emeritus) of FBC Bertram, Sunday school teacher and choir member.Charles was a charter member of the Burnet-Llano County chapter of Gideons, serving until 2014. He conducted Lay revivals in San Bernardino and Boston.Charles was a devoted member and steward of the Bertram community.During the time he was president of the Bertram Development Corporation, he was responsible for establishing and operating the Bertram swimming pool and the Bertram Nursing Home.He was a 42-year member of the Southern Basketball Officials Association where he called high school and college games throughout the area.For years, even after his retirement from officiating, he was regarded as one of the fairest and most professional officials in the association.He coached youth baseball for 13 years, was a member of the Lions Club, Volunteer Fire Chief and served as a member and officer of the Shady Grove Cemetery Association.Charles was loved and will be missed by his sister, Wilnora Arnold and sister-in-law Arlee Barton; his children, Mary E (Beth) Barton, Barbara Jordan and husband Jack, Charlette Scarborough, and Sarah Damron and husband Alan; eight grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and four great-great grandchildren.He is preceded in death by his parents, Alfred H. and Beulah Inman Barton; brothers Herman Barton and Wayne Alton Barton; brother-in-law James Barto Arnold II, and the love of his life, Mary Nell Barton.Pallbearers are Loyd Roberts, Cullen Henderson, Jack Jordan, Robbie Jordan, Matthew Jordan, Justin Scarborough, Stephen Arnold, and Alan Damron.  Honorary pallbearers include the Deacons of First Baptist Church Bertram, Shawn Lewis, Jordan Manuel,  Abdul Seruyange, Larry Barton, Keith Thurman, Barto Arnold, Charlie Burton, and Joe Avery.The family wishes to thank his pastor Gordon Bergstrom, the staff of Bertram Nursing Home and Rehab Center, the doctors and staff of Cedar Park Regional Medical Center, and the caring staff of Hospice Austin. Memorial contributions may be made to the Burnet/Llano Chapter of Gideons International  PO Box 33 Bertram, Texas, 78605 or the First Baptist Church Bertram Building Fund PO Box 1602 Bertram, Texas, 78605.Visitation was held Tuesday, July 12, 2016 at Clements-Wilcox Funeral Home in Burnet.Funeral service will be held Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 10 a.m. at First Baptist Church in Bertram.Arrang...

Douglas Russell

Monday, July 25, 2016

William Douglas Russell, of Adair; brother, Earlene Russell, of Mud Lake, ID; brother, Joe ‘ Bud’ Graves, of Pryor, OK; mother, Maggie Troglin Graves, of Adair; father, Enoch Columbus Russell, of San Bernardino, CA; step-father, Joe Graves, of Adair; his grandparents and other step-siblings.He is survived by his daughter Jeanne Russell Gregory and husband Len Gregory, of Adair; granddaughter, Jennifer Keller, of Tulsa; grandson, Josh Keller and wife Hanna Keller, of Jay, OK; granddaughter, Madison Keller, of Tulsa, OK; great-granddaughter, Reagan Keller, of Jay, OK; brother, Thomas Graves, of Adair, OK; brother, James Graves and wife Joan Graves, of Adair, OK; sister-in-law, Ella Rea Russell, of Mud Lake, ID; sister-in-law, Mary Lou Graves, of Pryor; brother-in-law, Tommy Frazier, of Adair, OK; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.Visitation will be held at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church, in Adair, on Thursday, July 21, 2016 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, at 4845 W. 370 Rd., Adair, OK 74330. A luncheon will be held at Pleasant Hope, Friday, July 22, 2016 at 11:00 a.m., to be followed by services at 1:00 p.m. He will be interred immediately after at Adair Cemetery. Flowers may be sent to Luginbuel Funeral Home in Vinita, OK.

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SIMPSON FAMILY MORTUARY LICENSE REVOKED - Lasentinel

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Family Mortuary from continuing business as the company is referring potential customers to its Long Beach location through radio advertisements.Simpson Mortuary also is licensed in Los Angeles and San Bernardino.The mortuary, under the direction of Curtis Simpson Sr., Derrick Sherrod King and Sonya Latrese Simpson has been levied with numerous complaints from the State Attorney General and most recently in 2013 when the mortuary conducted a service with the wrong remains in the casket.In that case, Simpson Family Mortuary was cited with misrepresentation or fraud, gross negligence, gross incompetence or unprofessional conduct. Calls to Simpson Family Mortuary are forwarded to its Long Beach location.A woman answered the phone and explained that the Inglewood location was under renovation and will be reopened in about six months.Then after a long pause, another woman identified as Ms. Starks said that the company is not doing business in Inglewood that it is “Closed.”Individuals should contact the Department of Consumer Affairs and the Cemetery and Funeral Bureau before proceeding with any business at Simpson family Mortuary.

If pot is legalized, where would the new tax… - The Mercury News

Monday, September 19, 2016

In 2015, the state took in $58 million in sales tax revenue from some 974 registered dispensaries, including nearly 400 in Los Angeles County and 70 to 80 each in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, according to Board of Equalization data.That revenue is on track to nearly double this year.Under Prop. 64, all marijuana sales would be taxed an additional 15 percent starting Jan. 1, 2018, on top of levies on regulated growers of $9.25 per ounce for dry flowers or $2.75 per ounce for leaves. Medical cannabis patients would be exempt from the state sales tax.The independent Legislative Analyst’s Office predicts Prop. 64 state tax revenues would total from the high hundreds of millions of dollars to more than $1 billion each year.That’s less than 1 percent of the state’s annual budget, or about what California brings in annually now from taxes on tobacco products.Keith Humphreys, a Stanford University professor who served on a state commission that studied approaches for legalizing marijuana, summed up the financial impact of Prop. 64 this way: “It’s not going to make us if we do, and it’s not going to break us if we don’t.”Tax revenue from legalized weed would first be used to cover “all reasonable costs” incurred by the state to administer and enforce the recreational cannabis regulations, according to the ballot measure.The Department of Consumer Affairs, which would oversee the new marijuana marketplace if Prop. 64 passes, doesn’t have an estimate yet of those administrative costs, according to spokeswoman Veronica Harms.The much smaller states of Oregon and Washington spend about $6 million and $8 million a year, respectively, on their medical and recreational programs.Colorado, which has the oldest and most robust recreational marijuana market in the nation, is budgeted to spend $16.3 million regulating legal marijuana this fiscal year, according to Robert Goulding, spokesman for the Colorado Department of Revenue.The program “pays it own way,” Goulding noted, with industry taxes, licenses and fees covering administrative costs while helping fund such things as school construction, youth education programs and poison control centers.Still, Prop. 64 opponents, including Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens, say they’re concerned that tax revenue from legal marijuana sales won’t cover harder-to-quantify effects on public safety and health issues.WHAT ABOUT LOCAL BENEFITS?One statewide Colorado levy on pot provides cities with money to use as they choose. That allowed Denver to add $29 million to its general fund budget in 2015, the Denver Post reports.While Prop. 64 doesn’t provide new, dedicated revenue directly to cities and counties, proponents say there are still ways local governments can benefit from the measure.California cities that permit recreational marijuana businesses could increase income from sales taxes.There also would be opportunities for governments, schools, public safety agencies and nonprofits in cities that welcome the cannabis industry to compete for hundreds of millions a year in grants that will fund substance abuse programs, offset enforcement costs and more.Opponents of legalized pot argue all law enforcement agencies should be eligible for such grants, because the ballot measure would permit cultivation and personal consumption of marijuana at residences across the state.“They’re still going to have to deal with the problems of home grows and use, but there’s no money available to them,” said Andrew Acosta, spokesman for the No on 64 campaign.Kinney called such criticisms “disingenuous.” He pointed to a Legislative Analyst’s Office estimate that the state will save tens of millions of dollars each year in criminal justice costs if marijuana is legal.The measure also says cities and counties can ask voters to approve extra local taxes on cannabis.At least 18...

New York police seeking killer of imam, assistant - DunyaNews Pakistan

Monday, August 15, 2016

Awad.CAIR plans to hold a funeral prayer service for the slain men on Monday.Last year, hate crimes against Muslims and mosques tripled across the country following extremist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, California, according to The New York Times. ...

Charles Cullen Barton - Burnet Bulletin

Monday, August 01, 2016

Deacon Emeritus) of FBC Bertram, Sunday school teacher and choir member.Charles was a charter member of the Burnet-Llano County chapter of Gideons, serving until 2014. He conducted Lay revivals in San Bernardino and Boston.Charles was a devoted member and steward of the Bertram community.During the time he was president of the Bertram Development Corporation, he was responsible for establishing and operating the Bertram swimming pool and the Bertram Nursing Home.He was a 42-year member of the Southern Basketball Officials Association where he called high school and college games throughout the area.For years, even after his retirement from officiating, he was regarded as one of the fairest and most professional officials in the association.He coached youth baseball for 13 years, was a member of the Lions Club, Volunteer Fire Chief and served as a member and officer of the Shady Grove Cemetery Association.Charles was loved and will be missed by his sister, Wilnora Arnold and sister-in-law Arlee Barton; his children, Mary E (Beth) Barton, Barbara Jordan and husband Jack, Charlette Scarborough, and Sarah Damron and husband Alan; eight grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and four great-great grandchildren.He is preceded in death by his parents, Alfred H. and Beulah Inman Barton; brothers Herman Barton and Wayne Alton Barton; brother-in-law James Barto Arnold II, and the love of his life, Mary Nell Barton.Pallbearers are Loyd Roberts, Cullen Henderson, Jack Jordan, Robbie Jordan, Matthew Jordan, Justin Scarborough, Stephen Arnold, and Alan Damron.  Honorary pallbearers include the Deacons of First Baptist Church Bertram, Shawn Lewis, Jordan Manuel,  Abdul Seruyange, Larry Barton, Keith Thurman, Barto Arnold, Charlie Burton, and Joe Avery.The family wishes to thank his pastor Gordon Bergstrom, the staff of Bertram Nursing Home and Rehab Center, the doctors and staff of Cedar Park Regional Medical Center, and the caring staff of Hospice Austin. Memorial contributions may be made to the Burnet/Llano Chapter of Gideons International  PO Box 33 Bertram, Texas, 78605 or the First Baptist Church Bertram Building Fund PO Box 1602 Bertram, Texas, 78605.Visitation was held Tuesday, July 12, 2016 at Clements-Wilcox Funeral Home in Burnet.Funeral service will be held Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 10 a.m. at First Baptist Church in Bertram.Arrang...

Douglas Russell

Monday, July 25, 2016

William Douglas Russell, of Adair; brother, Earlene Russell, of Mud Lake, ID; brother, Joe ‘ Bud’ Graves, of Pryor, OK; mother, Maggie Troglin Graves, of Adair; father, Enoch Columbus Russell, of San Bernardino, CA; step-father, Joe Graves, of Adair; his grandparents and other step-siblings.He is survived by his daughter Jeanne Russell Gregory and husband Len Gregory, of Adair; granddaughter, Jennifer Keller, of Tulsa; grandson, Josh Keller and wife Hanna Keller, of Jay, OK; granddaughter, Madison Keller, of Tulsa, OK; great-granddaughter, Reagan Keller, of Jay, OK; brother, Thomas Graves, of Adair, OK; brother, James Graves and wife Joan Graves, of Adair, OK; sister-in-law, Ella Rea Russell, of Mud Lake, ID; sister-in-law, Mary Lou Graves, of Pryor; brother-in-law, Tommy Frazier, of Adair, OK; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.Visitation will be held at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church, in Adair, on Thursday, July 21, 2016 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, at 4845 W. 370 Rd., Adair, OK 74330. A luncheon will be held at Pleasant Hope, Friday, July 22, 2016 at 11:00 a.m., to be followed by services at 1:00 p.m. He will be interred immediately after at Adair Cemetery. Flowers may be sent to Luginbuel Funeral Home in Vinita, OK.