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Alderson Prentis

Lake Avenue
Niantic, CT 06357
(860) 739-7631
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Fulton Theroux Funeral Service

13 Lake Avenue
Niantic, CT 06357
(860) 739-7631
Fulton Theroux Funeral Service funeral flowers

Thomas L Neilan and Sons Funeral Homes

48 Grand Street
Niantic, CT 06357
(860) 739-6112
Thomas L Neilan and Sons Funeral Homes funeral flowers

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Mobile Pokémon game encourages Jacksonville players to 'catch 'em all' - Florida Times-Union

Monday, July 25, 2016

Different types of Pokémon appear depending on where the user is and what time of the day he or she is playing.The game’s developer, Niantic Labs, calls it augmented reality. But people can think of it as a high-tech scavenger hunt.It’s introduced Jacksonville residents to both new sights, businesses and cultural landmarks — but also to a plethora of like-minded people who just want to be Pokémon masters.While walking through the St. Johns Town Center on Sunday, Irene Luna and William Seco ran into at least 100 other players.“Everyone was cool,” Seco said. “We were all talking to each other, trying to figure out where the best places to get Pokémon were.”“Pokestops,” refueling stations for in-game items, and “gyms,” Pokémon battle areas, pepper the shopping center. Players close to these stops can use those items, such as lures, to attract Pokémon to the area, which means the town center bustles with rare and unusual creatures. Both Luna and Seco were able to advance three levels in the couple hours they spent at the plaza. By 11 p.m., security officers in the area started kicking players out of the outdoor shopping area.Many businesses welcome the influx of gamers.Barnes & Noble offered refreshments to weary Pokémon trainers, while Spliff’s in downtown Jacksonville offers $1 off drinks for every Pokémon caught in-house during happy hour.Before downloading the app four days ago, Luna and Seco barely ever ventured out into the parks of Riverside.Now, “I’m like, oh wait, there’s a bunch of Pokémon and a gym over here, we definitely have to go,” Luna said.The two aren’t alone.Jade White, dressed in Pokémon-themed hat and socks, says he’d never been to Riverside Park off Park and Post Street before downloading Pokémon Go. The 28-year-old isn’t just exploring new communities. He’s also getting to know his own.Through the game, he’s met neighbors who happen to be Pokémon fans as well.“By my house in Springfield, we have a little crew together and we’re always using lures and catching Pokémon and telling each other where they are and about the game and the mechanics,” White said.His phone buzzed, a tell-tale sign of a Pokémon in the area. He zeroed in on the creature. Eyes focused on his screen, White barely acknowledged a fellow gamer as he approached — despite the fact the 16-year-old happened to be wearing a bright blue shirt and a Mickey Mouse sorcerer’s hat. The blue, said Cody Beard, represented his chosen team within the game: Team Mystic, one of three options available to gamers.Like White, the game takes Beard to neighborhoods outside his own.“I’ve been to Riverside,” he said. “But I’ve never explored. I never knew how many sculptures and monuments are in Riverside until I drove here, stopped and started walking around.”But Pokémon Go users aren’t welcome everywhere.The North Florida Pokémon Go Facebook page asks players to respect...

Why Pokémon Go Trainers Are Stumbling Upon Holy Ground in Their Quest to Catch 'Em All - KUT

Monday, July 18, 2016

That’s because Pokémon Go’s mapping network is derived from the network of Ingress, a similar game that was co-created by Niantic, a skunkworks project that was spawned at Google, and split from Alphabet, Google's parent company, last year. The map is based partly on Google Maps, which has had holy places on its map for years, and partly on the users of Ingress, who’ve marked certain locations as possible spots for portals (in Ingress), some of which have become gyms and Pokéstops in Pokémon Go. “We basically defined the kinds of places that we wanted to be part of the game," John Hanke, CEO and founder of Niantic, told Mashable. "Things that were public artwork, that were historical sites, that were buildings with some unique architectural history or characteristic, or a unique local business."We reached out to Niantic for this story, but have yet to receive a response.As of today, there are over 150 churches, mosques, temples and other places of worship on Pokémon Go, according to a Google map of Pokemon Go-related locations.Cemeteries as well have seen their fair share of activity as a result of the pocket monster-seeking throngs, including the Capital Parks Funeral Home in Pflugerville. An emailed statement from Cook-Walden, the cemetery’s administrator, asked players to avoid loitering in their cemeteries:We are aware that Cook-Walden/Capital Parks Funeral Home has been identified as a “hotspot” in the new Pokémon Go game. Cemeteries, by their nature, are quiet and serene spaces designed to serve as a final resting place and to provide families with a place to honor their loved ones. All Cook-Walden locations are privately owned and out of respect for the families we serve, Pokémon Go players are asked to refrain from loitering and playing the game while on the property.But, there’s no real clear opt-out (or opt-in) system for properties that are, or would like to be, Pokéstops or gyms.If there were, Dugas said, he’d ask Niantic to wipe St. Paul’s off the map.“If I had a choice, I’d ask them to remove us from the list, because this is private property, and people are coming at all hours of the day and night to play this game,” he said. "It’s one of those things that it would’ve been nice had we been asked before our place was chosen for this game. “On Thursday, Niantic briefly had a request/takedown submission form for locations, but they’ve since pulled it offline.If you’re looking for a good Friday afternoon laugh – or you’re just looking to stay informed while you lowkey weep for the future – here’s a smattering of tweets from Austin area trainers who’ve stumbled upon holy ground in their quest to catch ‘em all:[View the story "Houses of the Poké" on Storify]Let's block ads! a href="https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wi...

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Mobile Pokémon game encourages Jacksonville players to 'catch 'em all' - Florida Times-Union

Monday, July 25, 2016

Different types of Pokémon appear depending on where the user is and what time of the day he or she is playing.The game’s developer, Niantic Labs, calls it augmented reality. But people can think of it as a high-tech scavenger hunt.It’s introduced Jacksonville residents to both new sights, businesses and cultural landmarks — but also to a plethora of like-minded people who just want to be Pokémon masters.While walking through the St. Johns Town Center on Sunday, Irene Luna and William Seco ran into at least 100 other players.“Everyone was cool,” Seco said. “We were all talking to each other, trying to figure out where the best places to get Pokémon were.”“Pokestops,” refueling stations for in-game items, and “gyms,” Pokémon battle areas, pepper the shopping center. Players close to these stops can use those items, such as lures, to attract Pokémon to the area, which means the town center bustles with rare and unusual creatures. Both Luna and Seco were able to advance three levels in the couple hours they spent at the plaza. By 11 p.m., security officers in the area started kicking players out of the outdoor shopping area.Many businesses welcome the influx of gamers.Barnes & Noble offered refreshments to weary Pokémon trainers, while Spliff’s in downtown Jacksonville offers $1 off drinks for every Pokémon caught in-house during happy hour.Before downloading the app four days ago, Luna and Seco barely ever ventured out into the parks of Riverside.Now, “I’m like, oh wait, there’s a bunch of Pokémon and a gym over here, we definitely have to go,” Luna said.The two aren’t alone.Jade White, dressed in Pokémon-themed hat and socks, says he’d never been to Riverside Park off Park and Post Street before downloading Pokémon Go. The 28-year-old isn’t just exploring new communities. He’s also getting to know his own.Through the game, he’s met neighbors who happen to be Pokémon fans as well.“By my house in Springfield, we have a little crew together and we’re always using lures and catching Pokémon and telling each other where they are and about the game and the mechanics,” White said.His phone buzzed, a tell-tale sign of a Pokémon in the area. He zeroed in on the creature. Eyes focused on his screen, White barely acknowledged a fellow gamer as he approached — despite the fact the 16-year-old happened to be wearing a bright blue shirt and a Mickey Mouse sorcerer’s hat. The blue, said Cody Beard, represented his chosen team within the game: Team Mystic, one of three options available to gamers.Like White, the game takes Beard to neighborhoods outside his own.“I’ve been to Riverside,” he said. “But I’ve never explored. I never knew how many sculptures and monuments are in Riverside until I drove here, stopped and started walking around.”But Pokémon Go users aren’t welcome everywhere.The North Florida Pokémon Go Facebook page asks players to respect...

Why Pokémon Go Trainers Are Stumbling Upon Holy Ground in Their Quest to Catch 'Em All - KUT

Monday, July 18, 2016

That’s because Pokémon Go’s mapping network is derived from the network of Ingress, a similar game that was co-created by Niantic, a skunkworks project that was spawned at Google, and split from Alphabet, Google's parent company, last year. The map is based partly on Google Maps, which has had holy places on its map for years, and partly on the users of Ingress, who’ve marked certain locations as possible spots for portals (in Ingress), some of which have become gyms and Pokéstops in Pokémon Go. “We basically defined the kinds of places that we wanted to be part of the game," John Hanke, CEO and founder of Niantic, told Mashable. "Things that were public artwork, that were historical sites, that were buildings with some unique architectural history or characteristic, or a unique local business."We reached out to Niantic for this story, but have yet to receive a response.As of today, there are over 150 churches, mosques, temples and other places of worship on Pokémon Go, according to a Google map of Pokemon Go-related locations.Cemeteries as well have seen their fair share of activity as a result of the pocket monster-seeking throngs, including the Capital Parks Funeral Home in Pflugerville. An emailed statement from Cook-Walden, the cemetery’s administrator, asked players to avoid loitering in their cemeteries:We are aware that Cook-Walden/Capital Parks Funeral Home has been identified as a “hotspot” in the new Pokémon Go game. Cemeteries, by their nature, are quiet and serene spaces designed to serve as a final resting place and to provide families with a place to honor their loved ones. All Cook-Walden locations are privately owned and out of respect for the families we serve, Pokémon Go players are asked to refrain from loitering and playing the game while on the property.But, there’s no real clear opt-out (or opt-in) system for properties that are, or would like to be, Pokéstops or gyms.If there were, Dugas said, he’d ask Niantic to wipe St. Paul’s off the map.“If I had a choice, I’d ask them to remove us from the list, because this is private property, and people are coming at all hours of the day and night to play this game,” he said. "It’s one of those things that it would’ve been nice had we been asked before our place was chosen for this game. “On Thursday, Niantic briefly had a request/takedown submission form for locations, but they’ve since pulled it offline.If you’re looking for a good Friday afternoon laugh – or you’re just looking to stay informed while you lowkey weep for the future – here’s a smattering of tweets from Austin area trainers who’ve stumbled upon holy ground in their quest to catch ‘em all:[View the story "Houses of the Poké" on Storify]Let's block ads! a href="https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wi...