West Hartford CT Funeral Homes

West Hartford CT funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Molloy Funeral Home , Skinner David G Funeral Director , Urich Kelly H Funeral Director by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any West Hartford funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Hilborn Charles J Funeral Director

45 Colonial Street
West Hartford, CT 06110
(860) 236-5085
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Molloy Funeral Home

906 Farmington Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06119
(860) 232-1322
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Murphy Joseph E III Funeral Director

1084 New Britain Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06110
(860) 561-3800
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Skinner David G Funeral Director

1084 New Britain Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06110
(860) 561-3800
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Taylor and Modeen Funeral Home

136 South Main Street
West Hartford, CT 06107
(860) 521-4400
Taylor and Modeen Funeral Home funeral flowers

Urich Kelly H Funeral Director

136 South Main Street
West Hartford, CT 06107
(860) 521-4400
Urich Kelly H Funeral Director funeral flowers

West Hartford CT Obituaries and Death Notices

Simsbury Obituary: James Frost, 98 - Patch.com

Monday, March 27, 2017

President of the Connecticut State University System Foundation. Dr. Frost is survived by his two children, Janet Frost-Naleski and her husband Victor Naleski of West Hartford, and Elise Frost Alair and her husband, Patrick G. Alair also of West Hartford; grandsons, Julian and James Naleski; granddaughters and their husbands, Olivia Alair Dalton and Ryan Dalton and Allyssa Alair Murphy and William Murphy; two great-grandsons, Wallace Dalton and Colin Murphy; his sisters in law, Mary Wright Frost and Eleanor Lorenz Schneider; nieces and nephews and their spouses and children. Dr. Frost was predeceased by his son Roger Frost, his wife, Elsie Lorenz Frost and his brother David W. Frost. Dr. Frost will be remembered for his many contributions to the New York and Connecticut public colleges, for his books, his scholarship and his military service. He was a member of the Avon Congregational Church and the Country Club of Farmington. A Memorial Service will be held at the Avon Congregational Church at 6 W Main St, Avon, on Saturday, April 22nd at 2 PM. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to the Dr. James Frost scholarship fund at the, Connecticut State University System Foundation. Checks may be sent to Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System Office, Office of the President, 61 Woodland Street, Harford, CT 06105 (please be sure to note James Frost Scholarship on the memo line). Funeral arrangements are provided by Vincent Funeral Home, 880 Hopmeadow Street, Simsbury, CT 06070. Get free real-time news alerts from the Simsbury Patch.

Farmington Obituary: Virginia Maine, 87 - Patch.com

Monday, February 20, 2017

University and then worked in industrial chemistry laboratories in Springfield, MA and Hartford for several years. She married her husband, the late William Maine, in 1953. Together, they lived in West Hartford and Farmington, where they raised four children. Virginia was active in volunteer work through her church, and worked for a time as a literacy volunteer. An avid reader of history and biography, she also loved travel, food and wine, gardening and bird watching.Virginia was predeceased by her husband of 39 years, Bill Maine, in 1992. She is survived by her daughter, Eleanor Maine, her husband, Doug Frank, and grandchildren Daniel and Maggie Frank of Syracuse, NY; her son, Stephen Maine, and his wife, Gelah Penn, of Brooklyn, NY; her daughter, Elizabeth Maine, and grandson Paul Gyllensten of Stavanger, Norway; and son, David Maine, and his wife, Uzma Aslam Khan, of Hadley, MA; and many nieces and nephews, and grand-nieces and grand-nephews.A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, February 17 at the Church of Saint Peter Claver, 47 Pleasant St, West Hartford. Calling hours will be Thursday evening, Feb. 16 from 5 pm - 7 pm at Taylor & Modeen Funeral Home, 136 South Main St., West Hartford. Burial will be private at Old Saint Francis Cemetery in Torrington. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to any charity of the donor's choice. For directions and online condolences, please visit www.taylo...

Suzanne Corkin, Who Helped Pinpoint Nature of Memory, Dies at 79 - New York Times

Monday, June 06, 2016

Hartford on May 18, 1937, the only child of Lester Hammond, who worked in engine parts sales, and the former Mabelle Dowling, who worked for the local Department of Motor Vehicles. She grew up in West Hartford — “just down the street,” as she said many years later, from Dr. William Beecher Scoville, the brain surgeon who operated on Mr. Molaison in 1953.It was the era of the lobotomy, and Dr. Scoville was one of a number of swashbuckling surgeons doing experimental surgeries — they would be unethical today — for a variety of mental problems, including schizophrenia and severe depression, with often disastrous consequences. Mr. Molaison was that rarest of cases: Notwithstanding the seizures, he was mentally healthy and lucid, both before and after the surgery, making him an ideal experimental subject.Dr. Corkin, after graduating from Smith College with a degree in psychology, knew exactly where she wanted to go: to Dr. Milner’s laboratory at McGill. She focused on studying how the brain represents touch, an area of research many students found too laborious to take on.In her later work with Mr. Molaison at M.I.T., Dr. Corkin became equal parts experimentalist, protector and advocate. She closely guarded access to Mr. Molaison, especially after his parents died and he moved in with a family friend and later to a nursing home.Dr. Corkin lived in Charlestown, Mass. In addition to her daughter, she is survived by two sons, Damon and J. Zachary, and seven grandchildren. Her marriage to Charles Corkin ended in divorce.Dr. Corkin published more than 100 research papers, touching on topics as varied as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and psychosurgery. She also wrote or co-wrote 10 books.But it was her relationship with H.M. that was defining. His profound deficits made their relationship anything but normal — every time she walked in the room, she had to reintroduce herself — but that repetition bred a curious bond over time.“He thought he knew me from high school,” Dr. Corkin said in an interview with The New York Times in 2008.After Mr. Molaison died, Dr. Corkin arranged to have his brain removed, preserved, exhaustively imaged and finally sent for dissection and electronic mapping. It became a kind of monument as well as a historical artifact and resource for further study.In her book “Permanent Present Tense: The Unforgettable Life of the Amnesic Patient, H.M.” (2013), Dr. Corkin wrote about her transition from seeing Mr. Molaison as a “subject” to seeing him as a human being. “My interest in Henry,” she wrote, “had always been primarily intellectual; how else would I explain why I had stood on a chair in the basement of Mass General, ecstatic to see his brain expertly removed from his skull?”Still, she added: “I felt compassion for Henry and respected his outlook on life. He was more than a research participant. He was a collaborator — a prized partner in our larger quest to understand memory.”...

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Simsbury Obituary: James Frost, 98 - Patch.com

Monday, March 27, 2017

President of the Connecticut State University System Foundation. Dr. Frost is survived by his two children, Janet Frost-Naleski and her husband Victor Naleski of West Hartford, and Elise Frost Alair and her husband, Patrick G. Alair also of West Hartford; grandsons, Julian and James Naleski; granddaughters and their husbands, Olivia Alair Dalton and Ryan Dalton and Allyssa Alair Murphy and William Murphy; two great-grandsons, Wallace Dalton and Colin Murphy; his sisters in law, Mary Wright Frost and Eleanor Lorenz Schneider; nieces and nephews and their spouses and children. Dr. Frost was predeceased by his son Roger Frost, his wife, Elsie Lorenz Frost and his brother David W. Frost. Dr. Frost will be remembered for his many contributions to the New York and Connecticut public colleges, for his books, his scholarship and his military service. He was a member of the Avon Congregational Church and the Country Club of Farmington. A Memorial Service will be held at the Avon Congregational Church at 6 W Main St, Avon, on Saturday, April 22nd at 2 PM. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to the Dr. James Frost scholarship fund at the, Connecticut State University System Foundation. Checks may be sent to Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System Office, Office of the President, 61 Woodland Street, Harford, CT 06105 (please be sure to note James Frost Scholarship on the memo line). Funeral arrangements are provided by Vincent Funeral Home, 880 Hopmeadow Street, Simsbury, CT 06070. Get free real-time news alerts from the Simsbury Patch.

Farmington Obituary: Virginia Maine, 87 - Patch.com

Monday, February 20, 2017

University and then worked in industrial chemistry laboratories in Springfield, MA and Hartford for several years. She married her husband, the late William Maine, in 1953. Together, they lived in West Hartford and Farmington, where they raised four children. Virginia was active in volunteer work through her church, and worked for a time as a literacy volunteer. An avid reader of history and biography, she also loved travel, food and wine, gardening and bird watching.Virginia was predeceased by her husband of 39 years, Bill Maine, in 1992. She is survived by her daughter, Eleanor Maine, her husband, Doug Frank, and grandchildren Daniel and Maggie Frank of Syracuse, NY; her son, Stephen Maine, and his wife, Gelah Penn, of Brooklyn, NY; her daughter, Elizabeth Maine, and grandson Paul Gyllensten of Stavanger, Norway; and son, David Maine, and his wife, Uzma Aslam Khan, of Hadley, MA; and many nieces and nephews, and grand-nieces and grand-nephews.A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, February 17 at the Church of Saint Peter Claver, 47 Pleasant St, West Hartford. Calling hours will be Thursday evening, Feb. 16 from 5 pm - 7 pm at Taylor & Modeen Funeral Home, 136 South Main St., West Hartford. Burial will be private at Old Saint Francis Cemetery in Torrington. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to any charity of the donor's choice. For directions and online condolences, please visit www.taylo...

Suzanne Corkin, Who Helped Pinpoint Nature of Memory, Dies at 79 - New York Times

Monday, June 06, 2016

Hartford on May 18, 1937, the only child of Lester Hammond, who worked in engine parts sales, and the former Mabelle Dowling, who worked for the local Department of Motor Vehicles. She grew up in West Hartford — “just down the street,” as she said many years later, from Dr. William Beecher Scoville, the brain surgeon who operated on Mr. Molaison in 1953.It was the era of the lobotomy, and Dr. Scoville was one of a number of swashbuckling surgeons doing experimental surgeries — they would be unethical today — for a variety of mental problems, including schizophrenia and severe depression, with often disastrous consequences. Mr. Molaison was that rarest of cases: Notwithstanding the seizures, he was mentally healthy and lucid, both before and after the surgery, making him an ideal experimental subject.Dr. Corkin, after graduating from Smith College with a degree in psychology, knew exactly where she wanted to go: to Dr. Milner’s laboratory at McGill. She focused on studying how the brain represents touch, an area of research many students found too laborious to take on.In her later work with Mr. Molaison at M.I.T., Dr. Corkin became equal parts experimentalist, protector and advocate. She closely guarded access to Mr. Molaison, especially after his parents died and he moved in with a family friend and later to a nursing home.Dr. Corkin lived in Charlestown, Mass. In addition to her daughter, she is survived by two sons, Damon and J. Zachary, and seven grandchildren. Her marriage to Charles Corkin ended in divorce.Dr. Corkin published more than 100 research papers, touching on topics as varied as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and psychosurgery. She also wrote or co-wrote 10 books.But it was her relationship with H.M. that was defining. His profound deficits made their relationship anything but normal — every time she walked in the room, she had to reintroduce herself — but that repetition bred a curious bond over time.“He thought he knew me from high school,” Dr. Corkin said in an interview with The New York Times in 2008.After Mr. Molaison died, Dr. Corkin arranged to have his brain removed, preserved, exhaustively imaged and finally sent for dissection and electronic mapping. It became a kind of monument as well as a historical artifact and resource for further study.In her book “Permanent Present Tense: The Unforgettable Life of the Amnesic Patient, H.M.” (2013), Dr. Corkin wrote about her transition from seeing Mr. Molaison as a “subject” to seeing him as a human being. “My interest in Henry,” she wrote, “had always been primarily intellectual; how else would I explain why I had stood on a chair in the basement of Mass General, ecstatic to see his brain expertly removed from his skull?”Still, she added: “I felt compassion for Henry and respected his outlook on life. He was more than a research participant. He was a collaborator — a prized partner in our larger quest to understand memory.”...