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Beverly Hills Chapel FERO Funeral Home

5955 North Lecanto Highway
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-4551
Beverly Hills Chapel FERO Funeral Home funeral flowers

FERO Funeral Home With Crematory

5955 North Lecanto Highway
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-4551
FERO Funeral Home With Crematory funeral flowers

FERO Memorial Gardens

5891 North Lecanto Highway
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 489-9613
FERO Memorial Gardens funeral flowers

FERO Memorial Gardens Cemetery

5891 North Lecanto Highway
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-4646
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Beverly Hills FL Obituaries and Death Notices

Dear AIA: Please Acknowledge Us When We're Alive - CityLab

Monday, March 06, 2017

Williams, who died in 1980, designed nearly 3,000 buildings over a 50-year career, including several landmark structures in Los Angeles, from celebrity mansions to housing projects to the Beverly Hills Hotel. His Theme Building at LAX Airport—the one that looks like something from “The Jetsons”—serves as the city’s gateway for new arrivals. With its parabolic arches and glass-encased center, it is truly a work of art.But I remember my father gushing about another Williams project, the Angelus Funeral Home; with the marble and the sun glistening against the golden paint throughout the façade, this gilded funeral home has been called the “Rolls-Royce of mortuaries.”“What’s so great about it?” I would ask my father as we passed it on the way to school. To me, it was just another building on Crenshaw Boulevard. He’d proudly say, “a black man made that.”Yet Williams’ money and talent could not buy him acceptance. Clients refused to sit next to him during meetings, so he taught himself to start drawing upside down. In a 1937 essay for American Magazine called "I Am a Negro," he wrote:Today I sketched the preliminary plans for a large country house which will be erected in one of the most beautiful residential districts in the world. Sometimes I have dreamed of living there. I could afford such a home. But this evening, I returned to my own small, inexpensive home . . . in a comparatively undesirable section of Los Angeles. I must always live in that locality, or in another like it, because … I am a Negro.I have Williams’ quote pasted on every Moleskine I own—not because I’m negative or an angry black woman. It is a reminder of the realities black people have endured throughout the history of the profession. It’s also encouraging; even with this overt racism, Williams still pushed and was a master in his craft.Back in December, I was ecstatic to read that Paul Revere Williams was awarded the Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects, the most prestigious award in our field. But that happiness lasted only for a moment. Why couldn’t he be recognized when he was alive and practicing?A lot of black architects felt angry. Being publicly abandoned by our professional organization was too much to bear, especially given that, at the firm level, we are nearly always alone. Scroll down through any architectural firms’ website, go under the “Leadership” tab, and count the number of minorities you see. Most of the “diversity” you’ll see is in the administration and/or information technology departments.At networking events in New York, I’ll usually spot two or three black people. Being the frie...

Sylvia Rector, longtime Free Press restaurant critic, dies at age 66 - Detroit Free Press

Monday, January 02, 2017

Eiffel Tower on Sept. 29, 2015. (photo by charles hill) (Photo: CHARLES HILL, CHARLES HILL)Longtime Detroit Free Press restaurant critic Sylvia Rector died Tuesday afternoon at her home in Beverly Hills. She was 66, and had been diagnosed with colon cancer shortly after retiring from the Free Press in December 2015.During Rector’s 17 years as the restaurant critic, her job was to chronicle metro Detroit’s vibrant dining scene. That meant making critical distinctions between good, better and best when it came to what was on the plate, keeping tabs on trends and monitoring the never-ending churn of news on the beat.You might think that Rector’s biggest passion was food.It wasn’t.It was people.“In the metro Detroit dining community, Sylvia Rector was a restaurant superstar, but to me she was a friend,” said her longtime Free Press editor, Holly Griffin. “I think it was the friendships in her life that she cherished the most. She was a true perfectionist, and often her own toughest critic.“Sylvia was meticulous about every word, every sentence, every story. She is someone the world will truly miss.”?Thanks for sharing the table: It's time for life's dessertShe certainly wrote about the details of food with a graceful pen, discerning palate and infectious enthusiasm. But what she most enjoyed was sharing the lives and st...

Ed Reinecke, who resigned as California's lieutenant governor after a perjury conviction, dies at 92 - Los Angeles Times

Monday, January 02, 2017

Watergate prosecutor had not established that more than one senator attended the hearing.Howard Edwin “Ed” Reinecke was born in Medford, Ore., and grew up in Southern California, graduating from Beverly Hills High School in 1942.After serving as a Navy radioman during World War II, he obtained a mechanical engineering degree from Caltech, then founded an irrigation manufacturing company with his siblings.Reinecke triumphed in his first political contest in a San Fernando-Antelope Valley district where Democrats outnumbered Republicans by 40,000.In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, he attributed his win to “old-fashioned, handshaking, razzle-dazzle campaigning.”  As lieutenant governor — a job in which it can be difficult to make news — Reinecke championed coastal protection, worked to boost aerospace employment and pushed for reforms in the University of California system.But his accomplishments and political acumen were overshadowed by an emerging scandal.On April 19, 1972, Reinecke testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which was investigating whether Mitchell knew about the $400,000 pledge from the telecommunications company ITT before the Justice Department settled three antitrust disputes with the company.Reinecke had been lobbying for the convention to be in San Diego, where ITT Sheraton Corp. was opening a new hotel.Mitchell told the Senate Committee that he found out about the ITT pledge from Reinecke six weeks after the antitrust settlements. Reinecke supported that account in his own testimony.But Reinecke also acknowledged publicly that he had briefed Mitchell by phone about the ITT pledge months before the settlements. Reinecke said the discrepancy occurred because senators asked about face-to-face meetings, not phone calls.Prosecutors argued that Reinecke lied to protect Mitchell, in hopes that Mitchell would help Reinecke become governor.After Reinecke’s downfall, Reagan remained loyal to his former lieutenant, soliciting funds to help him pay his legal bills.“I’m sure, like most of us, you agree that Ed was —  and is — a victim of circumstances and Watergate,” Reagan said in his appeal to donors. “This year it’s our turn to help a man we all know to be a fine Christian and loyal husband.”Reinecke retreated to his Sacramento-area cattle ranch, working in real estate and running a restaurant. In 1983, he re-emerged as a political force when he was elected chairman of the state Republican Party.At Reagan’s funeral in 2004, Reinecke and his wife, Jean, had a private moment with the casket before members of the public entered, an indication of the two men’s closeness.Asked to sum up the former president’s legacy, Reinecke said: "I think it was the philosophy of government, that it should be of and for the people, rather than of and for the government. He just turned the whole thing around."Reineck...

Carrie Fisher, Child of Hollywood and 'Star Wars' Royalty, Dies at 60 - New York Times

Monday, January 02, 2017

Muhammad Ali.”Carrie Frances Fisher was born on Oct. 21, 1956, in Beverly Hills, Calif. She was the first child of her highly visible parents (they later had a son, Todd), and said in “Wishful Drinking” that, while her mother was under anesthetic delivering her, her father fainted.“So when I arrived,” Ms. Fisher wrote, “I was virtually unattended! And I have been trying to make up for that fact ever since.”In 1959, Ms. Reynolds divorced Eddie Fisher in the wake of his affair with Elizabeth Taylor, whom he married that same year. (Ms. Taylor later left him to marry Richard Burton.)Any semblance of a normal childhood was impossible for Ms. Fisher. At 15, she played a debutante in the Broadway musical “Irene,” which starred her mother, and appeared in Ms. Reynolds’s Las Vegas nightclub act. At 17, Ms. Fisher made her first movie, “Shampoo” (1975), Hal Ashby’s satire of Nixon-era politics and the libidinous Los Angeles culture of the time, in which she played the precocious daughter of a wealthy woman (Lee Grant) having an affair with a promiscuous hairdresser (Warren Beatty).She was one of roughly two dozen young actresses considered for the role of Princess Leia in Mr. Lucas’s marathon casting sessions for “Star Wars.” (Cindy Williams, Amy Irving, Sissy Spacek and Jodie Foster were among those who also read for the part.)Many of Ms. Fisher’s line readings from that film have since become part of the cinematic canon: her repeated, almost hypnotic exhortation, “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only hope”; her wryly unimpressed reaction when Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) arrives in disguise to rescue her from a detention cell: “Aren’t you a little short for a stormtrooper?”“Star Wars” became a financial and cultural phenomenon, launching more movies and a merchandising machine that splashed Ms. Fisher’s likeness on all manner of action figures and products while casting her into an uneasy limelight.She partied with the Rolling Stones during the making of “The Empire Strikes Back,” hosted “Saturday Night Live” and had romantic relationships with Dan Aykroyd (with whom she appeared in “The Blues Brothers”) and Paul Simon. She and Mr. Simon had a marriage that lasted less than a year, and he was inspired to write his song “H...

It's a Wonderful Life Cast List of Characters Still Living/Alive | Heavy ... - Heavy.com

Monday, December 26, 2016

Zuzu was her most famous role. As for the other main cast members, it appears that they have all passed away.James Stewart as George BaileyJames Stewart died on July 2, 1997 in Beverly Hills, California at the age of 89. He was born May 20, 1908 and he was an Academy Award winner. Stewart died of a Pulmonary embolism and he was laid to rest at Forest Lawn, Glendale, California. The embolism resulted after a thrombosis formed in his right leg. Stewart had been in and out of the hospital for the last couple years of his life. His last words were reported to be, “I’m going to be with Gloria now.” Gloria was his wife who had died of cancer.Donna Reed as Mary Hatch [Bailey]Donna Reed died on January 14, 1986, at the age of 64 years old. She died in Beverly Hills, California after battling pancreatic cancer, just two weeks before her 65th birthday. Reed was diagnosed with the illness just a few months before her death and was told her disease was terminal. Her final resting place is Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery.Henry Travers as Clarence OdbodyTravers lived to be 91 years old and passed away on October 18, 1965. His death was a result of arteriosclerosis, which is a thickening of the walls of the arteries. He was buried with his second wife Ann G. Murphy at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.Lionel Barrymore as Mr. PotterMany know Drew Barrymore as a popular actress today. She is actually the grandniece of Lionel Barrymore, who died on November 15, 1954 at the age of 76. Barrymore received TWO Hollywood Walk of Fame stars in his life time and died of a heart attack in Van Nuys, California. He was then entombed in the Calvary Cemetery in East Los Angeles.Thomas Mitchell as Uncle Billy BaileyMitchell died on December 17, 1962 at the age of 70 years old. His final resting place is the Chapel of the Pines Crematory in Los Angeles, California. Mitchell died of peritoneal mesothelioma, which is cancer that attacks the lining of the abdomen.Beulah Bondi as Ma BaileyBondi died on January 11, 1981 and lived to the age of 91. She was cremated and her remains were scattered into the Pacific Ocean. When Bondi tripped over her cat in he...

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Dear AIA: Please Acknowledge Us When We're Alive - CityLab

Monday, March 06, 2017

Williams, who died in 1980, designed nearly 3,000 buildings over a 50-year career, including several landmark structures in Los Angeles, from celebrity mansions to housing projects to the Beverly Hills Hotel. His Theme Building at LAX Airport—the one that looks like something from “The Jetsons”—serves as the city’s gateway for new arrivals. With its parabolic arches and glass-encased center, it is truly a work of art.But I remember my father gushing about another Williams project, the Angelus Funeral Home; with the marble and the sun glistening against the golden paint throughout the façade, this gilded funeral home has been called the “Rolls-Royce of mortuaries.”“What’s so great about it?” I would ask my father as we passed it on the way to school. To me, it was just another building on Crenshaw Boulevard. He’d proudly say, “a black man made that.”Yet Williams’ money and talent could not buy him acceptance. Clients refused to sit next to him during meetings, so he taught himself to start drawing upside down. In a 1937 essay for American Magazine called "I Am a Negro," he wrote:Today I sketched the preliminary plans for a large country house which will be erected in one of the most beautiful residential districts in the world. Sometimes I have dreamed of living there. I could afford such a home. But this evening, I returned to my own small, inexpensive home . . . in a comparatively undesirable section of Los Angeles. I must always live in that locality, or in another like it, because … I am a Negro.I have Williams’ quote pasted on every Moleskine I own—not because I’m negative or an angry black woman. It is a reminder of the realities black people have endured throughout the history of the profession. It’s also encouraging; even with this overt racism, Williams still pushed and was a master in his craft.Back in December, I was ecstatic to read that Paul Revere Williams was awarded the Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects, the most prestigious award in our field. But that happiness lasted only for a moment. Why couldn’t he be recognized when he was alive and practicing?A lot of black architects felt angry. Being publicly abandoned by our professional organization was too much to bear, especially given that, at the firm level, we are nearly always alone. Scroll down through any architectural firms’ website, go under the “Leadership” tab, and count the number of minorities you see. Most of the “diversity” you’ll see is in the administration and/or information technology departments.At networking events in New York, I’ll usually spot two or three black people. Being the frie...

Sylvia Rector, longtime Free Press restaurant critic, dies at age 66 - Detroit Free Press

Monday, January 02, 2017

Eiffel Tower on Sept. 29, 2015. (photo by charles hill) (Photo: CHARLES HILL, CHARLES HILL)Longtime Detroit Free Press restaurant critic Sylvia Rector died Tuesday afternoon at her home in Beverly Hills. She was 66, and had been diagnosed with colon cancer shortly after retiring from the Free Press in December 2015.During Rector’s 17 years as the restaurant critic, her job was to chronicle metro Detroit’s vibrant dining scene. That meant making critical distinctions between good, better and best when it came to what was on the plate, keeping tabs on trends and monitoring the never-ending churn of news on the beat.You might think that Rector’s biggest passion was food.It wasn’t.It was people.“In the metro Detroit dining community, Sylvia Rector was a restaurant superstar, but to me she was a friend,” said her longtime Free Press editor, Holly Griffin. “I think it was the friendships in her life that she cherished the most. She was a true perfectionist, and often her own toughest critic.“Sylvia was meticulous about every word, every sentence, every story. She is someone the world will truly miss.”?Thanks for sharing the table: It's time for life's dessertShe certainly wrote about the details of food with a graceful pen, discerning palate and infectious enthusiasm. But what she most enjoyed was sharing the lives and st...

Ed Reinecke, who resigned as California's lieutenant governor after a perjury conviction, dies at 92 - Los Angeles Times

Monday, January 02, 2017

Watergate prosecutor had not established that more than one senator attended the hearing.Howard Edwin “Ed” Reinecke was born in Medford, Ore., and grew up in Southern California, graduating from Beverly Hills High School in 1942.After serving as a Navy radioman during World War II, he obtained a mechanical engineering degree from Caltech, then founded an irrigation manufacturing company with his siblings.Reinecke triumphed in his first political contest in a San Fernando-Antelope Valley district where Democrats outnumbered Republicans by 40,000.In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, he attributed his win to “old-fashioned, handshaking, razzle-dazzle campaigning.”  As lieutenant governor — a job in which it can be difficult to make news — Reinecke championed coastal protection, worked to boost aerospace employment and pushed for reforms in the University of California system.But his accomplishments and political acumen were overshadowed by an emerging scandal.On April 19, 1972, Reinecke testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which was investigating whether Mitchell knew about the $400,000 pledge from the telecommunications company ITT before the Justice Department settled three antitrust disputes with the company.Reinecke had been lobbying for the convention to be in San Diego, where ITT Sheraton Corp. was opening a new hotel.Mitchell told the Senate Committee that he found out about the ITT pledge from Reinecke six weeks after the antitrust settlements. Reinecke supported that account in his own testimony.But Reinecke also acknowledged publicly that he had briefed Mitchell by phone about the ITT pledge months before the settlements. Reinecke said the discrepancy occurred because senators asked about face-to-face meetings, not phone calls.Prosecutors argued that Reinecke lied to protect Mitchell, in hopes that Mitchell would help Reinecke become governor.After Reinecke’s downfall, Reagan remained loyal to his former lieutenant, soliciting funds to help him pay his legal bills.“I’m sure, like most of us, you agree that Ed was —  and is — a victim of circumstances and Watergate,” Reagan said in his appeal to donors. “This year it’s our turn to help a man we all know to be a fine Christian and loyal husband.”Reinecke retreated to his Sacramento-area cattle ranch, working in real estate and running a restaurant. In 1983, he re-emerged as a political force when he was elected chairman of the state Republican Party.At Reagan’s funeral in 2004, Reinecke and his wife, Jean, had a private moment with the casket before members of the public entered, an indication of the two men’s closeness.Asked to sum up the former president’s legacy, Reinecke said: "I think it was the philosophy of government, that it should be of and for the people, rather than of and for the government. He just turned the whole thing around."Reineck...

Carrie Fisher, Child of Hollywood and 'Star Wars' Royalty, Dies at 60 - New York Times

Monday, January 02, 2017

Muhammad Ali.”Carrie Frances Fisher was born on Oct. 21, 1956, in Beverly Hills, Calif. She was the first child of her highly visible parents (they later had a son, Todd), and said in “Wishful Drinking” that, while her mother was under anesthetic delivering her, her father fainted.“So when I arrived,” Ms. Fisher wrote, “I was virtually unattended! And I have been trying to make up for that fact ever since.”In 1959, Ms. Reynolds divorced Eddie Fisher in the wake of his affair with Elizabeth Taylor, whom he married that same year. (Ms. Taylor later left him to marry Richard Burton.)Any semblance of a normal childhood was impossible for Ms. Fisher. At 15, she played a debutante in the Broadway musical “Irene,” which starred her mother, and appeared in Ms. Reynolds’s Las Vegas nightclub act. At 17, Ms. Fisher made her first movie, “Shampoo” (1975), Hal Ashby’s satire of Nixon-era politics and the libidinous Los Angeles culture of the time, in which she played the precocious daughter of a wealthy woman (Lee Grant) having an affair with a promiscuous hairdresser (Warren Beatty).She was one of roughly two dozen young actresses considered for the role of Princess Leia in Mr. Lucas’s marathon casting sessions for “Star Wars.” (Cindy Williams, Amy Irving, Sissy Spacek and Jodie Foster were among those who also read for the part.)Many of Ms. Fisher’s line readings from that film have since become part of the cinematic canon: her repeated, almost hypnotic exhortation, “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only hope”; her wryly unimpressed reaction when Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) arrives in disguise to rescue her from a detention cell: “Aren’t you a little short for a stormtrooper?”“Star Wars” became a financial and cultural phenomenon, launching more movies and a merchandising machine that splashed Ms. Fisher’s likeness on all manner of action figures and products while casting her into an uneasy limelight.She partied with the Rolling Stones during the making of “The Empire Strikes Back,” hosted “Saturday Night Live” and had romantic relationships with Dan Aykroyd (with whom she appeared in “The Blues Brothers”) and Paul Simon. She and Mr. Simon had a marriage that lasted less than a year, and he was inspired to write his song “H...

It's a Wonderful Life Cast List of Characters Still Living/Alive | Heavy ... - Heavy.com

Monday, December 26, 2016

Zuzu was her most famous role. As for the other main cast members, it appears that they have all passed away.James Stewart as George BaileyJames Stewart died on July 2, 1997 in Beverly Hills, California at the age of 89. He was born May 20, 1908 and he was an Academy Award winner. Stewart died of a Pulmonary embolism and he was laid to rest at Forest Lawn, Glendale, California. The embolism resulted after a thrombosis formed in his right leg. Stewart had been in and out of the hospital for the last couple years of his life. His last words were reported to be, “I’m going to be with Gloria now.” Gloria was his wife who had died of cancer.Donna Reed as Mary Hatch [Bailey]Donna Reed died on January 14, 1986, at the age of 64 years old. She died in Beverly Hills, California after battling pancreatic cancer, just two weeks before her 65th birthday. Reed was diagnosed with the illness just a few months before her death and was told her disease was terminal. Her final resting place is Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery.Henry Travers as Clarence OdbodyTravers lived to be 91 years old and passed away on October 18, 1965. His death was a result of arteriosclerosis, which is a thickening of the walls of the arteries. He was buried with his second wife Ann G. Murphy at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.Lionel Barrymore as Mr. PotterMany know Drew Barrymore as a popular actress today. She is actually the grandniece of Lionel Barrymore, who died on November 15, 1954 at the age of 76. Barrymore received TWO Hollywood Walk of Fame stars in his life time and died of a heart attack in Van Nuys, California. He was then entombed in the Calvary Cemetery in East Los Angeles.Thomas Mitchell as Uncle Billy BaileyMitchell died on December 17, 1962 at the age of 70 years old. His final resting place is the Chapel of the Pines Crematory in Los Angeles, California. Mitchell died of peritoneal mesothelioma, which is cancer that attacks the lining of the abdomen.Beulah Bondi as Ma BaileyBondi died on January 11, 1981 and lived to the age of 91. She was cremated and her remains were scattered into the Pacific Ocean. When Bondi tripped over her cat in he...