Cocoa FL Funeral Homes

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Beckman Williamson Funeral Homes and Crematory

5400 Village Drive
Cocoa, FL 32955
(321) 635-1973
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Brevard Memorial Funeral Home and Cemetery

5475 North Cocoa Boulevard
Cocoa, FL 32927
(321) 636-3720
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Brevard Memorial Park

300 Spring Street
Cocoa, FL 32927
(321) 631-7311
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Funeral Solutions

5455 North Cocoa Boulevard Suite 7
Cocoa, FL 32927
(321) 638-1373
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Cocoa FL Obituaries and Death Notices

Satellite Beach police officers remembered after 1992 deadly crash - Florida Today

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Flagg pulled over a carload of juveniles from Christmas for drug and alcohol violations about 1:50 a.m., and Hartmann served as his backup, Pearson said. That's when Cocoa Beach resident Kevin O'Neill — whose blood-alcohol level measured 0.22, more than double the legal limit — slammed into the officers in a Ford Ranger pickup, killing them."Twenty-five years is a long time. It has been a long, sad, difficult time. And being here in Satellite Beach is not easy," Sally Flagg told the audience. She lives in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.Vero Beach 13-year-old Emma Fini, who would have been Phil Flagg's niece, sang "Amazing Grace" and burst into tears afterwards. Davenport talk...

John Glenn, first American to orbit the Earth, dies at 95 - Washington Post

Monday, December 12, 2016

He did not drink, smoke or swear and maintained a disciplined, straight-arrow manner while training in Cocoa Beach, Fla., near NASA’s space center at Cape Canaveral. Comfortable in front of cameras — which followed the astronauts everywhere after they signed a $500,000 deal with Life magazine for a series of exclusive stories — Mr. Glenn was in many ways the public face of NASA.Privately, however, there was friction among the “Magnificent Seven,” as the Mercury astronauts were dubbed in the news media. Concerned that some of his colleagues’ dalliances with women could lead to bad publicity and jeopardize the manned space program, Mr. Glenn confronted his fellow astronauts, admonishing them to avoid any semblance of wrongdoing.“There was no doubt whatsoever that Glenn meant every word of it,” Wolfe wrote in his 1979 book, “The Right Stuff.” “When he got his back up, he was formidable. He was not to be trifled with.”Not all of the astronauts were pleased with Mr. Glenn’s righteousness, however, and Shepard told him to mind his own business.“His moralizing led to colorful and heated exchanges among the pilots, and it wasn’t pleasant banter,” Shepard and Slayton wrote in their 1995 book, “Moon Shot.”When the astronauts voted among themselves to confer the honor of being the first American in space, they chose Shepard.On May 5, 1961, Shepard had a 15-minute suborbital space flight, followed two months later by Grissom on a similar mission. But two Soviet cosmonauts had already circled the Earth by August 1961.Mr. Glenn’s turn came on Feb. 20, 1962. After 11 delays because of bad weather or faulty equipment, he sat in his tiny space capsule, the Friendship 7, atop an MA-6 rocket that had failed in 40 percent of its test flights.After liftoff at 9:47 a.m., backup pilot Carpenter said on an internal tape later released to the public, “Godspeed, John Glenn.”The moment was shared by practically the entire nation, as a television audience of 135 million — the largest up to that time — witnessed the launch.After the first of three scheduled orbits, the capsule began to wobble. Mr. Glenn overrode the automatic navigation system and piloted Friendship 7 with manual controls, reaching a height of 162 miles above the Earth’s surface.Midway through the flight, a warning light indicated that the heat shield, which would protect the capsule during its reentry into Earth’s atmosphere, might have come loose. Without a heat shield, it was possible that Mr. Glenn could burn up inside the capsule as it raced back from space.As Friendship 7 was descending, all radio contact was lost. Shepard, acting as “capsule communicator” from Cape Canaveral, tried to reach Mr. Glenn in his spacecraft, saying, “How do you read? Over.”After about 4 minutes and 20 seconds of silence, Mr. Glenn could finally be heard: “Loud and clear. How me?”“How are you doing?” Shepard asked.“Oh, pretty good,” Mr. Glenn casually responded, later adding, “but that was a real fireball, boy.

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Satellite Beach police officers remembered after 1992 deadly crash - Florida Today

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Flagg pulled over a carload of juveniles from Christmas for drug and alcohol violations about 1:50 a.m., and Hartmann served as his backup, Pearson said. That's when Cocoa Beach resident Kevin O'Neill — whose blood-alcohol level measured 0.22, more than double the legal limit — slammed into the officers in a Ford Ranger pickup, killing them."Twenty-five years is a long time. It has been a long, sad, difficult time. And being here in Satellite Beach is not easy," Sally Flagg told the audience. She lives in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.Vero Beach 13-year-old Emma Fini, who would have been Phil Flagg's niece, sang "Amazing Grace" and burst into tears afterwards. Davenport talk...

John Glenn, first American to orbit the Earth, dies at 95 - Washington Post

Monday, December 12, 2016

He did not drink, smoke or swear and maintained a disciplined, straight-arrow manner while training in Cocoa Beach, Fla., near NASA’s space center at Cape Canaveral. Comfortable in front of cameras — which followed the astronauts everywhere after they signed a $500,000 deal with Life magazine for a series of exclusive stories — Mr. Glenn was in many ways the public face of NASA.Privately, however, there was friction among the “Magnificent Seven,” as the Mercury astronauts were dubbed in the news media. Concerned that some of his colleagues’ dalliances with women could lead to bad publicity and jeopardize the manned space program, Mr. Glenn confronted his fellow astronauts, admonishing them to avoid any semblance of wrongdoing.“There was no doubt whatsoever that Glenn meant every word of it,” Wolfe wrote in his 1979 book, “The Right Stuff.” “When he got his back up, he was formidable. He was not to be trifled with.”Not all of the astronauts were pleased with Mr. Glenn’s righteousness, however, and Shepard told him to mind his own business.“His moralizing led to colorful and heated exchanges among the pilots, and it wasn’t pleasant banter,” Shepard and Slayton wrote in their 1995 book, “Moon Shot.”When the astronauts voted among themselves to confer the honor of being the first American in space, they chose Shepard.On May 5, 1961, Shepard had a 15-minute suborbital space flight, followed two months later by Grissom on a similar mission. But two Soviet cosmonauts had already circled the Earth by August 1961.Mr. Glenn’s turn came on Feb. 20, 1962. After 11 delays because of bad weather or faulty equipment, he sat in his tiny space capsule, the Friendship 7, atop an MA-6 rocket that had failed in 40 percent of its test flights.After liftoff at 9:47 a.m., backup pilot Carpenter said on an internal tape later released to the public, “Godspeed, John Glenn.”The moment was shared by practically the entire nation, as a television audience of 135 million — the largest up to that time — witnessed the launch.After the first of three scheduled orbits, the capsule began to wobble. Mr. Glenn overrode the automatic navigation system and piloted Friendship 7 with manual controls, reaching a height of 162 miles above the Earth’s surface.Midway through the flight, a warning light indicated that the heat shield, which would protect the capsule during its reentry into Earth’s atmosphere, might have come loose. Without a heat shield, it was possible that Mr. Glenn could burn up inside the capsule as it raced back from space.As Friendship 7 was descending, all radio contact was lost. Shepard, acting as “capsule communicator” from Cape Canaveral, tried to reach Mr. Glenn in his spacecraft, saying, “How do you read? Over.”After about 4 minutes and 20 seconds of silence, Mr. Glenn could finally be heard: “Loud and clear. How me?”“How are you doing?” Shepard asked.“Oh, pretty good,” Mr. Glenn casually responded, later adding, “but that was a real fireball, boy.