New Smyrna Beach FL Funeral Homes

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Baldwin Brothers Memorial Care Services

1 North Causeway
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169
(386) 428-2424
Baldwin Brothers Memorial Care Services funeral flowers

Baldwin Hughey Funeral Home

1 North Causeway
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169
(386) 428-2424
Baldwin Hughey Funeral Home funeral flowers

Dudley Funeral Homes

1108 North Dixie Freeway
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32168
(386) 428-6414
Dudley Funeral Homes funeral flowers

Gainous Wynn Funeral Home of New Smyrna Beach

570 Washington Street
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32168
(386) 428-5751
Gainous Wynn Funeral Home of New Smyrna Beach funeral flowers

New Smyrna Beach FL Obituaries and Death Notices

Seabreeze High memorial preserves legacy of lost Army Ranger - Daytona Beach News-Journal

Monday, December 26, 2016

Robert McKeen, a retired infantry colonel and ranger whose military career spanned 27 years.McKeen, 77, now living in New Smyrna Beach, never met Davis but feels a natural bond through their lives as servicemen and through a sense of camaraderie that transcends generations. He set out to cement Davis’ military mark after reading a news article on the fallen staff sergeant, mobilizing to host a reception for rangers, family and friends who traveled to Davis’ funeral and raising additional funds for the commemorative token.A year’s worth of health challenges delayed McKeen from anchoring the stone in the ground, but once he regained enough of his strength he returned to his mission of ensuring Davis would not be forgotten in the school that had raised him.That mission reflected the Army Ranger Creed, part of which states, “I will never leave a fallen comrade to fall into the hands of the enemy.”“Nobody’s going to move that stone,” McKeen said.A LEADER FROM THE STARTDavis, who was born in Germany but spent most of his childhood years in Daytona Beach, found himself in uniform at an early age when in middle school he joined Post 415 of the Daytona Beach Fire Explorers program, which mentored students in fire service and public safety.At 13, he was elected to sergeant of arms, a youth position within the program that put him at the head of maintaining discipline among students.“It was very, very apparent from the minute I met him that he wanted to do something in his community that made a difference,” said Lori Becker, a retired lieutenant in the Daytona Beach Fire Department and the former adviser of the defunct program.“He was a helper,” Becker said. “He wanted to be involved. He wanted to be a leader. He was a leader in the post and he helped mentor all of the other Fire Explorers to be the best that they could be.”Those early years of leadership formed a stepping stone for Davis, Becker said, adding, “I think his first uniform and his first badge meant the world to him.”While a kid, Davis entertained the usual childhood dreams of going professional with football or basketball — he was a standout football player for the Sandcrabs — but a hunger to become a warrior compelled him to enlist in the Marines.“I about had a heart attack,” said his father figure, Forrest Buckwald, co-owner of Buck’s Gun Rack in Daytona Beach.Once past the initial shock, Buckwald helped sway Davis to switch his enlistment to the Army, where he believed career opportunities would be more boundless and where he said Davis came to find his niche.The last decade of Davis’ life unfolded with 11 deployments, which dropped him into some of the most dangerous corners of the world, including Tikrit, Iraq, where he was killed under enemy fire.The decorated veteran’s family members are still battling to soldier on without him, Adams said. His death was particularly devastating for their mother, Ellen Davis, who still lives in Daytona Beach.For Adams, now stationed in Honolulu, the process to move forward is regularly stymied by her military role in mortuary affairs, in which she processes the remains of soldiers.“So every time I’m working with a family or a set of remains, it’s always a constant reminder,” she said.As painful as the reminders are, Adams and Buckwald are more pained at the thought of their hero being forgotten by the masses he devoted his life to protecting.The me...

Folger, Edward Joseph - Madison.com

Monday, November 28, 2016

Edward C. Folger II of Stoughton; four grandchildren, Christina Kreigh of Dodge Center, Minn., Andrew Kreigh of Madison, Maxwell and Noah Schimanski of McFarland; brother, Richard (Gail) Folger of New Smyrna Beach, Fla.; and brothers and sisters-in-law, Gerald (Sharon) Scallon, James Scallon and Marilou Jeffcott. He was preceded in death by his wife, Kathleen; and his parents.A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH, 5101 Schofield St., Monona, at 11 a.m., on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, with Father Chad Droessler presiding. Burial will follow at Roselawn Memorial Park with military honors. Visitation will be held at GUNDERSON EAST FUNERAL HOME, 5203 Monona Drive, Madison, from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m., on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, and from 10 a.m. until the time of the Mass on Wednesday.In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Agrace HospiceCare, Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church or to the family in Ed's name.The family would like to thank all of the many people that helped to care for Ed, especially during the last three months. Most importantly, they would like to thank Dr. Musa for his devoted care and concern for our unforgettable father.Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inboxSign up here to receive a daily email alert of local and national obituaries"Dad, you are unforgettable in every way."...

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Seabreeze High memorial preserves legacy of lost Army Ranger - Daytona Beach News-Journal

Monday, December 26, 2016

Robert McKeen, a retired infantry colonel and ranger whose military career spanned 27 years.McKeen, 77, now living in New Smyrna Beach, never met Davis but feels a natural bond through their lives as servicemen and through a sense of camaraderie that transcends generations. He set out to cement Davis’ military mark after reading a news article on the fallen staff sergeant, mobilizing to host a reception for rangers, family and friends who traveled to Davis’ funeral and raising additional funds for the commemorative token.A year’s worth of health challenges delayed McKeen from anchoring the stone in the ground, but once he regained enough of his strength he returned to his mission of ensuring Davis would not be forgotten in the school that had raised him.That mission reflected the Army Ranger Creed, part of which states, “I will never leave a fallen comrade to fall into the hands of the enemy.”“Nobody’s going to move that stone,” McKeen said.A LEADER FROM THE STARTDavis, who was born in Germany but spent most of his childhood years in Daytona Beach, found himself in uniform at an early age when in middle school he joined Post 415 of the Daytona Beach Fire Explorers program, which mentored students in fire service and public safety.At 13, he was elected to sergeant of arms, a youth position within the program that put him at the head of maintaining discipline among students.“It was very, very apparent from the minute I met him that he wanted to do something in his community that made a difference,” said Lori Becker, a retired lieutenant in the Daytona Beach Fire Department and the former adviser of the defunct program.“He was a helper,” Becker said. “He wanted to be involved. He wanted to be a leader. He was a leader in the post and he helped mentor all of the other Fire Explorers to be the best that they could be.”Those early years of leadership formed a stepping stone for Davis, Becker said, adding, “I think his first uniform and his first badge meant the world to him.”While a kid, Davis entertained the usual childhood dreams of going professional with football or basketball — he was a standout football player for the Sandcrabs — but a hunger to become a warrior compelled him to enlist in the Marines.“I about had a heart attack,” said his father figure, Forrest Buckwald, co-owner of Buck’s Gun Rack in Daytona Beach.Once past the initial shock, Buckwald helped sway Davis to switch his enlistment to the Army, where he believed career opportunities would be more boundless and where he said Davis came to find his niche.The last decade of Davis’ life unfolded with 11 deployments, which dropped him into some of the most dangerous corners of the world, including Tikrit, Iraq, where he was killed under enemy fire.The decorated veteran’s family members are still battling to soldier on without him, Adams said. His death was particularly devastating for their mother, Ellen Davis, who still lives in Daytona Beach.For Adams, now stationed in Honolulu, the process to move forward is regularly stymied by her military role in mortuary affairs, in which she processes the remains of soldiers.“So every time I’m working with a family or a set of remains, it’s always a constant reminder,” she said.As painful as the reminders are, Adams and Buckwald are more pained at the thought of their hero being forgotten by the masses he devoted his life to protecting.The me...

Folger, Edward Joseph - Madison.com

Monday, November 28, 2016

Edward C. Folger II of Stoughton; four grandchildren, Christina Kreigh of Dodge Center, Minn., Andrew Kreigh of Madison, Maxwell and Noah Schimanski of McFarland; brother, Richard (Gail) Folger of New Smyrna Beach, Fla.; and brothers and sisters-in-law, Gerald (Sharon) Scallon, James Scallon and Marilou Jeffcott. He was preceded in death by his wife, Kathleen; and his parents.A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH, 5101 Schofield St., Monona, at 11 a.m., on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, with Father Chad Droessler presiding. Burial will follow at Roselawn Memorial Park with military honors. Visitation will be held at GUNDERSON EAST FUNERAL HOME, 5203 Monona Drive, Madison, from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m., on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, and from 10 a.m. until the time of the Mass on Wednesday.In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Agrace HospiceCare, Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church or to the family in Ed's name.The family would like to thank all of the many people that helped to care for Ed, especially during the last three months. Most importantly, they would like to thank Dr. Musa for his devoted care and concern for our unforgettable father.Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inboxSign up here to receive a daily email alert of local and national obituaries"Dad, you are unforgettable in every way."...