Plantation FL Funeral Homes

Plantation FL funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Exclusive Family Estates , Forest Lawn Memorial Park and Funeral Homes by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Plantation funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Funeral Flowers

Express your deepest sympathies - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Sympathy Roses

Give comfort and loving support — order a delivery today!

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

Standing Sprays

Heart-felt tributes to honor a dear friend or loved one who has passed away

Exclusive Family Estates

1671 NW 103 Ave
Plantation, FL 33322
(877) 678-8628
Exclusive Family Estates funeral flowers

Forest Lawn Memorial Park and Funeral Homes

2401 Davie Road
Plantation, FL 33317
(954) 792-9360
Forest Lawn Memorial Park and Funeral Homes funeral flowers

Plantation FL Obituaries and Death Notices

Reba Keene

Monday, June 26, 2017

Reba Keene, 76, of Salem, VA and Plantation, FL, went to be with the Lord on Monday, June 19, 2017. She was preceded by grandparents, SS and Lula Weiss; parents, Dewey R. and Ethel V. (Weiss) Link; and sister, Loretta Link. Left to cherish her memory are husband, James A. Keene; sons, William H. Staton, Jr. and wife, Veronica, and Greg Keene and wife, Mary; sister, Dorothy Via; grandchildren, Brandon and Cole Staton; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. The family will receive friends from 6 until 8 p.m. on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at John M. Oakey & Son Funeral Home. A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 22, 2017 at the funeral home with Pastor Adam Hughes officiating. The interment will be private. The family would like to extend a special thanks to Dr. Quasir Raza, Dr. Stephan Vivian, Dr. Mark Currie, and the staff of the Infusion Clinic at Lewis-Gale Medical Center. Online condolences may be expressed at www.johnmoakey.com.

Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Choctaw language.It was settled in 1768, with an original population of 25. In 1805, Burwell Vick purchased the land with jewels from the Choctaws.The land eventually became a plantation owned by Vick’s son, W.H. Vick, who developed what's called the 100 cotton seed in 1843, a seed that that helped planters maximize pounds of cotton per acre and was eventually sold commercially.BILLY WATKINS: Tale of the kid who couldn't throwIn 1901, when the nearly 6,000 acres was divided among the four children, Henry Phelps became owner of the family homestead. It’s now in the hands of his grandchildren and a great-grandchild.And while some of the buildings still need to be renovated, others are ready for viewing.Among them: The general store/doll house and its thousands of occupants.The dolls were owned by Dorothy Cole Phelps, mother of Henry III and Carolyn May.“Her father and uncle owned a funeral home,” May explains. “She and her friends used to act like they were having funerals. They would bury dolls and say a prayer over them.“Later on in life, the memory of burying those dolls bothered her. She started collecting them when she was 35. She died in 2011 when she was 99. What you see here are the dolls she collected over the course of 60 years.”They sit side by side on rows of shelves. Others stare out of glass cases that were part of the store. Many look the same. But then there is the Planter’s Peanut Man, smiling at you like an old friend. There, too, are Bozo, Popeye, the Jolly Green Giant and Howdy Doody.One glass counter holds only Barbies. This is the Delta, after all, and society status matters.“Whenever people come in here, they’ll say, ‘Oh, I had a doll just like that one,’ and point,” Phelps says. “It really hits home with women of all ages.”Sprinkled among the dolls are musical instruments: A miniature piano. A snare drum. An accordion. A French horn, trumpet and trombone. A rusty harpsichord.I ask Phelps if he is sure the dolls don’t talk and play music when darkness comes and humans are...

Obituaries for Friday, Jan. 13, 2017 - Thegardenisland.com

Monday, February 06, 2017

Kucho’ CoyasoMarcelino “Kucho” Coyaso passed away at the age of 88 on Dec. 20, 2016, at Wilcox Memorial Hospital. Born on Sept. 28, 1928, he was a truck driver and trainer with the McBryde Sugar Plantation Company.He is preceded in death by his father, Isodoro Coyaso; mother, Maria Coyaso; son, Damien Coyaso; grandson, Austin Baretto; brothers, Ernest “Nato” Coyaso; and Phillip “Bito” Coyaso; and sister, Beatrice Coyaso Camacho.Kucho is survived by his wife, Isabella Coyaso; sons, Russell (Valerie) Coyaso of Brydeswood, Alfred (Colleen) Coyaso of Lawai, and Gerry (Cheryl) Coyaso of Kalaheo; daughter, Annamarie (Howard) Tolbe of Ele’ele; twelve grandchildren: Shandon Coyaso, Bruce (Wailana) Kanoho Jr., Crystal (Koty) Kaiakapu, Ashley (Tyson) Relacion, Aaron (Sheena) Coyaso, Brandon Kanoho, Shantel (RJ) Coyaso, Chelsie (Howie) Kanoho, Adam (Sunni) Coyaso, Rachel (Camden) Coyaso, Hope Coyaso, and Chace Coyaso; fifteen great-grandchildren; sisters, Laura “Lita” Coyaso Vales of Pearl City, O’ahu, and Dora Coyaso Vales of Vacaville, California; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.Memorial services will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, at Holy Cross Church in Kalaheo. Visitation w...

Senior Citizens, Even 80-Year-Olds, Can Be Organ Donors - Kaiser Health News

Monday, December 26, 2016

Of the 9,079 deceased organ donors in the U.S. in 2015, only 618 were aged 65 or older, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, or OPTN.That’s due in part to U.S. policies and practices that often impose age cut-offs and strict federal regulations that penalize centers for poor outcomes, potentially reducing the organ pool in a nation where nearly 120,000 people await transplants, experts say.Use Our ContentThis KHN story can be republished for free (details).But a new study by researchers at the University of Torino in northwest Italy suggests that age alone should not exclude older organs — in this case kidneys — from consideration.A review of nearly 650 kidneys transplanted from deceased donors aged 50 to older than 80 from 2003 through 2013 found that patient survival and organ function was high, even among the oldest donors.“According to these findings, organs from extremely aged donors represent a resource that should be accurately evaluated,” wrote Dr. Luigi Biancone, a nephrologist and lead author of the study published Thursday in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.The study echoes previous research and bolsters a growing view in the U.S. that older organs should be considered for some patients, said Dr. David Klassen, chief medical officer of the United Network for Organ Sharing, or UNOS, the nonprofit group that oversees the nation’s transplant system. He was also medical director of the kidney and pancreas transplant programs at the University of Maryland Hospital for nearly 30 years.“The conversation in this country has been recognizing that there’s pote...

Funeral Home Flowers

Plantation News

Reba Keene

Monday, June 26, 2017

Reba Keene, 76, of Salem, VA and Plantation, FL, went to be with the Lord on Monday, June 19, 2017. She was preceded by grandparents, SS and Lula Weiss; parents, Dewey R. and Ethel V. (Weiss) Link; and sister, Loretta Link. Left to cherish her memory are husband, James A. Keene; sons, William H. Staton, Jr. and wife, Veronica, and Greg Keene and wife, Mary; sister, Dorothy Via; grandchildren, Brandon and Cole Staton; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. The family will receive friends from 6 until 8 p.m. on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at John M. Oakey & Son Funeral Home. A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 22, 2017 at the funeral home with Pastor Adam Hughes officiating. The interment will be private. The family would like to extend a special thanks to Dr. Quasir Raza, Dr. Stephan Vivian, Dr. Mark Currie, and the staff of the Infusion Clinic at Lewis-Gale Medical Center. Online condolences may be expressed at www.johnmoakey.com.

Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Choctaw language.It was settled in 1768, with an original population of 25. In 1805, Burwell Vick purchased the land with jewels from the Choctaws.The land eventually became a plantation owned by Vick’s son, W.H. Vick, who developed what's called the 100 cotton seed in 1843, a seed that that helped planters maximize pounds of cotton per acre and was eventually sold commercially.BILLY WATKINS: Tale of the kid who couldn't throwIn 1901, when the nearly 6,000 acres was divided among the four children, Henry Phelps became owner of the family homestead. It’s now in the hands of his grandchildren and a great-grandchild.And while some of the buildings still need to be renovated, others are ready for viewing.Among them: The general store/doll house and its thousands of occupants.The dolls were owned by Dorothy Cole Phelps, mother of Henry III and Carolyn May.“Her father and uncle owned a funeral home,” May explains. “She and her friends used to act like they were having funerals. They would bury dolls and say a prayer over them.“Later on in life, the memory of burying those dolls bothered her. She started collecting them when she was 35. She died in 2011 when she was 99. What you see here are the dolls she collected over the course of 60 years.”They sit side by side on rows of shelves. Others stare out of glass cases that were part of the store. Many look the same. But then there is the Planter’s Peanut Man, smiling at you like an old friend. There, too, are Bozo, Popeye, the Jolly Green Giant and Howdy Doody.One glass counter holds only Barbies. This is the Delta, after all, and society status matters.“Whenever people come in here, they’ll say, ‘Oh, I had a doll just like that one,’ and point,” Phelps says. “It really hits home with women of all ages.”Sprinkled among the dolls are musical instruments: A miniature piano. A snare drum. An accordion. A French horn, trumpet and trombone. A rusty harpsichord.I ask Phelps if he is sure the dolls don’t talk and play music when darkness comes and humans are...

Obituaries for Friday, Jan. 13, 2017 - Thegardenisland.com

Monday, February 06, 2017

Kucho’ CoyasoMarcelino “Kucho” Coyaso passed away at the age of 88 on Dec. 20, 2016, at Wilcox Memorial Hospital. Born on Sept. 28, 1928, he was a truck driver and trainer with the McBryde Sugar Plantation Company.He is preceded in death by his father, Isodoro Coyaso; mother, Maria Coyaso; son, Damien Coyaso; grandson, Austin Baretto; brothers, Ernest “Nato” Coyaso; and Phillip “Bito” Coyaso; and sister, Beatrice Coyaso Camacho.Kucho is survived by his wife, Isabella Coyaso; sons, Russell (Valerie) Coyaso of Brydeswood, Alfred (Colleen) Coyaso of Lawai, and Gerry (Cheryl) Coyaso of Kalaheo; daughter, Annamarie (Howard) Tolbe of Ele’ele; twelve grandchildren: Shandon Coyaso, Bruce (Wailana) Kanoho Jr., Crystal (Koty) Kaiakapu, Ashley (Tyson) Relacion, Aaron (Sheena) Coyaso, Brandon Kanoho, Shantel (RJ) Coyaso, Chelsie (Howie) Kanoho, Adam (Sunni) Coyaso, Rachel (Camden) Coyaso, Hope Coyaso, and Chace Coyaso; fifteen great-grandchildren; sisters, Laura “Lita” Coyaso Vales of Pearl City, O’ahu, and Dora Coyaso Vales of Vacaville, California; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.Memorial services will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, at Holy Cross Church in Kalaheo. Visitation w...

Senior Citizens, Even 80-Year-Olds, Can Be Organ Donors - Kaiser Health News

Monday, December 26, 2016

Of the 9,079 deceased organ donors in the U.S. in 2015, only 618 were aged 65 or older, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, or OPTN.That’s due in part to U.S. policies and practices that often impose age cut-offs and strict federal regulations that penalize centers for poor outcomes, potentially reducing the organ pool in a nation where nearly 120,000 people await transplants, experts say.Use Our ContentThis KHN story can be republished for free (details).But a new study by researchers at the University of Torino in northwest Italy suggests that age alone should not exclude older organs — in this case kidneys — from consideration.A review of nearly 650 kidneys transplanted from deceased donors aged 50 to older than 80 from 2003 through 2013 found that patient survival and organ function was high, even among the oldest donors.“According to these findings, organs from extremely aged donors represent a resource that should be accurately evaluated,” wrote Dr. Luigi Biancone, a nephrologist and lead author of the study published Thursday in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.The study echoes previous research and bolsters a growing view in the U.S. that older organs should be considered for some patients, said Dr. David Klassen, chief medical officer of the United Network for Organ Sharing, or UNOS, the nonprofit group that oversees the nation’s transplant system. He was also medical director of the kidney and pancreas transplant programs at the University of Maryland Hospital for nearly 30 years.“The conversation in this country has been recognizing that there’s pote...