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Crematory of Venice

265 Nokomis Avenue South
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 488-2291
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Farley Funeral Home and Crematory

265 Nokomis Ave S
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 488-2291
Farley Funeral Home and Crematory funeral flowers

Venice FL Obituaries and Death Notices

Actor and director Richard Iglewski dies at 61 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, January 16, 2017

McSweeny said.Iglewski appeared in a dozen productions of “A Christmas Carol” at the Guthrie, and had numerous Shakespeare credits as well: “The Merchant of Venice,” “Romeo and Juliet,” “Othello” and Twelfth Night.” He applied his talent to dramas and comedies alike, classic and contemporary.He began his Guthrie tenure under Garland Wright in 1985.“He was very funny and known for his mastery in his later years, but he could be very moving as a straight actor,” said Isabell Monk O’Connor, who acted with Iglewski in about two dozen shows.Iglewski performed in “The Miser” and “Tartuffe” at Theatre de la Jeune Lune, “Entertaining Mr. Sloane” at the Jungle and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at Chicago Shakespeare. He acted at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., and toured the country as part of John Houseman’s The Acting Company. In 1999, Dowling gave him the Artistic Director’s Award.Dowling’s memories of Iglewski, whom he directed extensively, included the actor’s portrayals of Bottom in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Chasuble in “The Importance of Being Earnest,” and Leonato, the governor, in “Much Ado About Nothing.” Dowling said that last performance was astonishing.“He found all the comic notes in the earlier scenes with ease but when it came to the scene where he condemns his daughter in the chapel, Julio dropped the comedy and delivered the speech with a kind of ferocity that was chilling,” said Dowling.Iglewski’s spiral began when his longtime partner, Tim Lee, who was managing editor of Lavender Magazine and co-founder of Outward Spiral theater company, died of an apparent suicide. Lee disappeared near the Mississippi River on Oct. 28, 2002, and his body was recovered on March 17, 2003.Iglewski “was very fragile at that point and hadn’t healed from his loss,” said Monk O’Connor. “He was probably seen by tens and tens of thousands of people, but he was very private. I hope there’s a service that we are privy to. We loved that brilliant man.”Toward the end of his career, the Guthrie cast Iglewski in “Peer Gynt,” which starred Mark Rylance, and McSweeny’s production of “A View from the Bridge.” He had to be replaced in both.“While he had left the stage some years ago, he has left an amazing legacy in the memories of his colleagues and of Guthrie audiences,” said Dowling.Services or survivors have not been announced. ...

Mary E. Whaley - Pickaway News Journal

Monday, January 09, 2017

Joyce (John) DeLong of Kingston, Michele (Steve) Ash of Canal Winchester and Lori (Gary) Kettenburg of Riverview, Florida; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; her sister, Marjorie Bunch of Venice, Florida; her sister-in-law, Mary Neal of Chillicothe; and many friends.Mary was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; her daughter, Cheryl; her brother, Donald Neal; her brother and sister-in-law, William and Ruth Neal; and her brother-in-law, Booker Bunch.Mary had worked as an office administrator. She was a graduate of Central Catholic High School and was a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Circleville.The family wishes to extend a special thank you to the staff of Pickaway Manor, the staff of Heartland Hospice and to the St. Joseph's Church communion servers.A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at noon on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017, in St. Mary's Catholic Church with Fr. Lawrence Hummer, officiant. Burial will follow in St. Margaret's Cemetery.In keeping with Mary's wishes, calling hours will not be observed. Contributions in her memory may be made to a charity of choice.The Fawcett Oliver Glass and Palmer Funeral Home is honored to serve the Whaley family. Visit www.fawcett-palmer.com.

Wendell Lake, 82 - Wareham Week

Monday, December 12, 2016

He was a life member of the Wareham-New Bedford Lodge of Elks #73, a member of the Cromesset Tribe of Red Men #156, and a member of the Loyal Order of Moose #1308 in Venice, Florida where he wintered for 18 years. Mr. Lake also served as an executive board member for United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Local #328, Providence, Rhode Island.Besides his wife, he is survived by his daughter, Susan Akins and her partner John Thatcher, Jr. and his son, David Lake and his wife Joanne Savastano all of Wareham and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his brothers, the late James Lake, Elmer Lake and Edgar Lake and his sister, the late Phyllis Mustakangas.His funeral service will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at the Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral Home, 2599 Cranberry Highway (Rt. 28), Wareham at 10 a.m. Interment will be in Center Cemetery, Wareham. Visiting hours will be Monday from 4 to 8 p.m.Donations in his memory may be made to a charity of one’s choice. For directions and on-line guestbook visit: www.ccgfuneralhome.com.

Andrzej Wajda, Towering Auteur of Polish Cinema, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Monday, October 10, 2016

Kurosawa. He was given the Japanese Imperial Prize for his contribution to film in 1996 and an honorary Academy Award in 2000. He also received lifetime achievement awards from the film festivals in Venice in 1998 and Berlin in 2006.The images and textures that shaped the imaginative landscape of Mr. Wajda’s films were drawn from a life that reflected Poland’s tragic modern history, beginning with the outbreak of World War II, when the Nazis invaded and obliterated Poland in partnership with the Russians.The agony continued through nearly six years of German occupation, when the Nazis used Polish soil to establish the ghettos and killing fields of the Holocaust. Then, with liberation, came more decades of totalitarian oppression as successive regimes in Moscow sought to impose Soviet-style Communism on a devoutly Roman Catholic country, an effort that even Stalin once conceded was like “putting a saddle on a bull.”Andrzej Wajda (pronounced ON-jay VIE-dah) was born on March 6, 1926, in Suwalki, a garrison town near Poland’s border with Lithuania. His father was a cavalry officer, and as young Andrzej moved with his parents from camp to camp, he and his brother would playfully choreograph their own battles while all around them real troops carried out training maneuvers.The German Army invaded when he was 12. Two weeks later, the Russians joined in the dismemberment of Poland. The country was quickly overrun by Nazi and Communist forces carrying out the collusion of the Hitler-Stalin pact.As it did for many Poles, history turned personal for Mr. Wajda. His father was taken prisoner, one of the 4,300 Polish officers the Russians killed and secretly buried in the Katyn Forest in Ukraine.Though most Poles came to understand who was responsible for what was known simply as Katyn, the official version of events under Communist rule insisted that the Polish officers had been killed by the Germans. Only in 1991 could Mr. Wajda, by then an elected senator in post-Communist Poland, make a documentary called “The Katyn Forest” in homage to his father and those murdered with him.His 2007 dramatization of the same story, called simply “Katyn,” was an Oscar nominee for best foreign-language film. A. O. Scott, in The New York Times, praised it as “a powerful corrective to decades of distortion and forgetting.”After his father disappeared, young Andrzej lived through the war with his mother, a teacher, working at odd jobs in the countryside. He also had what he later called “a posting of no significance” with the Home Army, a resistance group sponsored by the anti-Communist Polish government in exile in London.He enrolled in the Fine Arts Academy in Krakow after the war but transferred to the newly opened Film School in Lodz. He began making films soon after graduating.A War TrilogyHis first, “A Generation,” finished in 1955, was shot in settings of rubble and ruin, in a Warsaw that had not yet recovered from the house-to-house devastation of the war. It centered on the wartime experiences of a tough Warsaw adolescent who joins a resistance group headed by a young woman with whom he has fallen in love.Some aspects of the film reflect the Communist Party line of the time; the young Communist fighters are depicted as purer, braver and more committed than the members of the Home A...

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Actor and director Richard Iglewski dies at 61 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, January 16, 2017

McSweeny said.Iglewski appeared in a dozen productions of “A Christmas Carol” at the Guthrie, and had numerous Shakespeare credits as well: “The Merchant of Venice,” “Romeo and Juliet,” “Othello” and Twelfth Night.” He applied his talent to dramas and comedies alike, classic and contemporary.He began his Guthrie tenure under Garland Wright in 1985.“He was very funny and known for his mastery in his later years, but he could be very moving as a straight actor,” said Isabell Monk O’Connor, who acted with Iglewski in about two dozen shows.Iglewski performed in “The Miser” and “Tartuffe” at Theatre de la Jeune Lune, “Entertaining Mr. Sloane” at the Jungle and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at Chicago Shakespeare. He acted at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., and toured the country as part of John Houseman’s The Acting Company. In 1999, Dowling gave him the Artistic Director’s Award.Dowling’s memories of Iglewski, whom he directed extensively, included the actor’s portrayals of Bottom in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Chasuble in “The Importance of Being Earnest,” and Leonato, the governor, in “Much Ado About Nothing.” Dowling said that last performance was astonishing.“He found all the comic notes in the earlier scenes with ease but when it came to the scene where he condemns his daughter in the chapel, Julio dropped the comedy and delivered the speech with a kind of ferocity that was chilling,” said Dowling.Iglewski’s spiral began when his longtime partner, Tim Lee, who was managing editor of Lavender Magazine and co-founder of Outward Spiral theater company, died of an apparent suicide. Lee disappeared near the Mississippi River on Oct. 28, 2002, and his body was recovered on March 17, 2003.Iglewski “was very fragile at that point and hadn’t healed from his loss,” said Monk O’Connor. “He was probably seen by tens and tens of thousands of people, but he was very private. I hope there’s a service that we are privy to. We loved that brilliant man.”Toward the end of his career, the Guthrie cast Iglewski in “Peer Gynt,” which starred Mark Rylance, and McSweeny’s production of “A View from the Bridge.” He had to be replaced in both.“While he had left the stage some years ago, he has left an amazing legacy in the memories of his colleagues and of Guthrie audiences,” said Dowling.Services or survivors have not been announced. ...

Mary E. Whaley - Pickaway News Journal

Monday, January 09, 2017

Joyce (John) DeLong of Kingston, Michele (Steve) Ash of Canal Winchester and Lori (Gary) Kettenburg of Riverview, Florida; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; her sister, Marjorie Bunch of Venice, Florida; her sister-in-law, Mary Neal of Chillicothe; and many friends.Mary was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; her daughter, Cheryl; her brother, Donald Neal; her brother and sister-in-law, William and Ruth Neal; and her brother-in-law, Booker Bunch.Mary had worked as an office administrator. She was a graduate of Central Catholic High School and was a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Circleville.The family wishes to extend a special thank you to the staff of Pickaway Manor, the staff of Heartland Hospice and to the St. Joseph's Church communion servers.A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at noon on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017, in St. Mary's Catholic Church with Fr. Lawrence Hummer, officiant. Burial will follow in St. Margaret's Cemetery.In keeping with Mary's wishes, calling hours will not be observed. Contributions in her memory may be made to a charity of choice.The Fawcett Oliver Glass and Palmer Funeral Home is honored to serve the Whaley family. Visit www.fawcett-palmer.com.

Wendell Lake, 82 - Wareham Week

Monday, December 12, 2016

He was a life member of the Wareham-New Bedford Lodge of Elks #73, a member of the Cromesset Tribe of Red Men #156, and a member of the Loyal Order of Moose #1308 in Venice, Florida where he wintered for 18 years. Mr. Lake also served as an executive board member for United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Local #328, Providence, Rhode Island.Besides his wife, he is survived by his daughter, Susan Akins and her partner John Thatcher, Jr. and his son, David Lake and his wife Joanne Savastano all of Wareham and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his brothers, the late James Lake, Elmer Lake and Edgar Lake and his sister, the late Phyllis Mustakangas.His funeral service will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at the Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral Home, 2599 Cranberry Highway (Rt. 28), Wareham at 10 a.m. Interment will be in Center Cemetery, Wareham. Visiting hours will be Monday from 4 to 8 p.m.Donations in his memory may be made to a charity of one’s choice. For directions and on-line guestbook visit: www.ccgfuneralhome.com.

Andrzej Wajda, Towering Auteur of Polish Cinema, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Monday, October 10, 2016

Kurosawa. He was given the Japanese Imperial Prize for his contribution to film in 1996 and an honorary Academy Award in 2000. He also received lifetime achievement awards from the film festivals in Venice in 1998 and Berlin in 2006.The images and textures that shaped the imaginative landscape of Mr. Wajda’s films were drawn from a life that reflected Poland’s tragic modern history, beginning with the outbreak of World War II, when the Nazis invaded and obliterated Poland in partnership with the Russians.The agony continued through nearly six years of German occupation, when the Nazis used Polish soil to establish the ghettos and killing fields of the Holocaust. Then, with liberation, came more decades of totalitarian oppression as successive regimes in Moscow sought to impose Soviet-style Communism on a devoutly Roman Catholic country, an effort that even Stalin once conceded was like “putting a saddle on a bull.”Andrzej Wajda (pronounced ON-jay VIE-dah) was born on March 6, 1926, in Suwalki, a garrison town near Poland’s border with Lithuania. His father was a cavalry officer, and as young Andrzej moved with his parents from camp to camp, he and his brother would playfully choreograph their own battles while all around them real troops carried out training maneuvers.The German Army invaded when he was 12. Two weeks later, the Russians joined in the dismemberment of Poland. The country was quickly overrun by Nazi and Communist forces carrying out the collusion of the Hitler-Stalin pact.As it did for many Poles, history turned personal for Mr. Wajda. His father was taken prisoner, one of the 4,300 Polish officers the Russians killed and secretly buried in the Katyn Forest in Ukraine.Though most Poles came to understand who was responsible for what was known simply as Katyn, the official version of events under Communist rule insisted that the Polish officers had been killed by the Germans. Only in 1991 could Mr. Wajda, by then an elected senator in post-Communist Poland, make a documentary called “The Katyn Forest” in homage to his father and those murdered with him.His 2007 dramatization of the same story, called simply “Katyn,” was an Oscar nominee for best foreign-language film. A. O. Scott, in The New York Times, praised it as “a powerful corrective to decades of distortion and forgetting.”After his father disappeared, young Andrzej lived through the war with his mother, a teacher, working at odd jobs in the countryside. He also had what he later called “a posting of no significance” with the Home Army, a resistance group sponsored by the anti-Communist Polish government in exile in London.He enrolled in the Fine Arts Academy in Krakow after the war but transferred to the newly opened Film School in Lodz. He began making films soon after graduating.A War TrilogyHis first, “A Generation,” finished in 1955, was shot in settings of rubble and ruin, in a Warsaw that had not yet recovered from the house-to-house devastation of the war. It centered on the wartime experiences of a tough Warsaw adolescent who joins a resistance group headed by a young woman with whom he has fallen in love.Some aspects of the film reflect the Communist Party line of the time; the young Communist fighters are depicted as purer, braver and more committed than the members of the Home A...