Blackfoot ID Funeral Homes

Blackfoot ID funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Hawker Perry L , Hill Hawker Sandberg Funeral Home , Riverside Thomas Cemetery by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Blackfoot funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Grove City Funeral Home

288 North Shilling Avenue
Blackfoot, ID 83221
(208) 785-0230
Grove City Funeral Home funeral flowers

Hawker Perry L

805 West 200 South
Blackfoot, ID 83221
(208) 684-3644
Hawker Perry L funeral flowers

Hill Hawker Sandberg Funeral Home

132 South Shilling Avenue
Blackfoot, ID 83221
(208) 785-1320
Hill Hawker Sandberg Funeral Home funeral flowers

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

13 South 725 West
Blackfoot, ID 83221
(208) 684-3861
Riverside Thomas Cemetery funeral flowers

Blackfoot ID Obituaries and Death Notices

Blackfoot baseball player who died in wreck memorialized - Idaho State Journal

Monday, May 01, 2017

BLACKFOOT — Pacen Hayes laid down on Cole Baler’s bed numb to everything around him.The Blackfoot High School senior was surrounded by his baseball teammates, but he never felt more alone. His mind was blank, except for lingering questions about why and how he lost his best friend on Sunday. Hours earlier, Baler was killed in a wreck that occurred around 2 a.m. on Blacktail Road east of Bone Road near Idaho Falls. Baler was a passenger in an SUV being driven by a juvenile female.Baler was a classmate of Hayes, and the two have been playing baseball together since they were 9 years old. On Wednesday, the Broncos’ baseball team honored their late teammate in a home game against Pocatello.AdvertisementBefore the matchup, Baler’s No. 11 jerseys, hat and glove were placed on first base, the position he played for Blackfoot, and given to his mother, Kindra. The Broncos also honored Baler with a ceremonial first pitch from Cayden Cornell. And when Baler’s No. 4 spot came up in the lineup, his...

J. Bruce Wackenhut Obituary - WKBN.com

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Ann Mathieson and her husband, Scott of Aurora, New York and Janet Michaelsen and her husband, Christian of Annandale, Virginia; two sons, Paul B. Wackenhut and his wife, Martha, of Blackfoot, Idaho and Norman C. Wackenhut and his wife, Socorro of South Lake Tahoe, California; nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; first wife and a brother, Norman H. Wackenhut.Calling hours will be held on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Loutzenhiser-Jordan Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Inc., 366-368 S. Main St., Greenville, Pennsylvania. There will also be calling hours prior to services on Wednesday, April 5, 2017 from 10:00 – 10:45 a.m. in Roth Library in Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Funeral services will be Wednesday, April 5, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 1 Trinity Place, Greenville, Pennsylvania with Rev. Lee Penvose, Pastor, officiatingMemorial contributions may be made to Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 1 Trinity Place, Greenville, Pennsylvania 16125 or to the Greenville Public Library, 330 Main St., Greenville, Pennsylvania 16125.To view obituary visit www.loutzenhiserfuneralhomes.com.Order Flowers HereShare this:Related PostsAdvertisement...

Longtime Idaho journalist Michael O'Donnell dies from apparent heart attack - Idaho State Journal

Monday, March 27, 2017

Even though he was retired, he still wrote a weekly column and news stories for the Journal.AdvertisementPrior to working for the Journal, O’Donnell was a teacher at Blackfoot High School. And before that he was the editor of the Morning News newspaper in Blackfoot and the Power County Press newspaper in American Falls.O’Donnell won dozens of journalism awards over the years for his writing.His childhood was spent in Colorado, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa and Canada. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Iowa State University. Then he earned his master’s degree in instructional technology at Idaho State University.He is survived by his wife Jody. They were married for 44 years.Ian Fennell, editor of the Idaho State Journal, said O’Donnell’s death came as a shock to the Journal’s staff.“I had just talked to him on Sunday and he was really enjoying retirement and had a lot of plans for the future,” Fennell said. “Mike was a great writer who cared a lot about people and his community. There were times I can remember when he broke down into tears over a particularly sad story he was covering. There were a lot of times when his columns or his stories would choke me up. He had a talent for capturing the human condition in his writing and relaying that to the readers. That’s what I’ll remember most about him.”Information about O’Donnell’s funeral services will be provided Wednesday.

Obituary: Earl Burke Heaton - Twin Falls Times-News

Monday, February 27, 2017

Tom Cat who will miss him dearly.Burke is survived by his loving wife Carolyn; his children, Debbie (Gerry) Hoyt of Orderville, Utah, Kim (Jannette) Heaton of Highland, Utah, Cathy (Mike) Bostwick of Blackfoot, Idaho, Curtis (Charlene) Heaton of Paradise, Utah, Darla (Brian) Hansen of Standrod, Utah, Jon (Tresa) Heaton of Mapleton, Utah, Jex (Lanise) Heaton of North Ogden, Utah, Rod (Shelley) Heaton of Payson, Utah, Tenaly Bleak of Otis, Colo., Amy (Joey) Wight of Elba, Idaho, Tyler (Robin) Heaton of Panaca, Nev., and Jed (Meshia) Heaton of Standrod, Utah; his numerous grandchildren; two sisters, Elaine Hoyt of Glendale, Utah, and Nanell Mann of Sandy, Utah.He was preceded in death by two sons, Brent Kay Heaton and Guy Elmo Heaton; and one grandson, Porter Earl Heaton. Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inbox .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col{ margin-right: 20px; } .whatcounts-form-container .whatcounts-min .left-col{ max-width: none; margin: 0; } .whatcounts-form-container .disclaimer { font-size: 13px; line-height: 14px; margin-bottom:10px; clear:both; } .whatcounts-form-container .input-group-addon.wc-addon-captcha{ padding: 4px 10px; border-left: 0; } The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, at the Almo LDS Church, with Bishop Jason Tracy officiating. Burial will follow in the Standrod Cemetery.A viewing for family and friends will be held from 6 until 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, at the Almo LDS church and from 10 until 10:45 a.m. Saturday, prior to the service also at the church.Arrangements have been entrusted to the care of the Rasmussen Funeral Home of Burley.

Yeah, don't worry, Lynyrd Skynyrd will play it in Murphys - Modesto Bee

Monday, August 22, 2016

It was for the guys who went before us. When it all came together, it was beautiful.Q: You and other band members have been involved in side projects over the years. Your band Blackfoot recently reformed and released a new album. How important is having that other outlet for you and the band?A: I think it’s very important for everyone to have an outlet. Lynyrd Skynyrd has always been our main project. But Gary and (backing vocalist Dale Krantz-Rossington) have a blues record coming out soon. And Johnny just released a live record with his brother (.38 Special founder Donnie Van Zant). Me and the name I own, Blackfoot, I did something different in that we produced a new record with four young guys for a new generation. We all have to have our outlets. Me, for one, I can’t sit still and sit and home and not do anything after a tour is over.Q: The band is an institution now, what do you think – despite its lineup changes and tragedies – has kept you together over the decades, and what motivates you today?A: Really, to be honest with you, basically it’s the songs themselves. The songs are just such classic tunes that will be here long after I am gone. It’s history. I think that what happens is sometimes we take a lot of heat because people say, “Oh, you aren’t the original group.” That’s true, but there was a bad tragedy that happened and took that original group. You can’t say the original group broke up and all of a sudden we decided to get back together.Tragedies happen in everyone’s lives. You have to sit there and ask yourself – the people who they happened to, would they want the band to carry on the legacy of the group and music? We always ask ourselves that every time we are faced with that and losing someone. And we always believe they would have wanted it to go on and the music to go on. And the fans want it. The day it gets to where the fans quit coming, maybe that’s the day we pull the plug. Maybe that’s the day we look at each other and say, “That’s enough.”Q: The new Showtime rock ’n’ roll series “Roadies” just did an episode that was really an extended story about Lynyrd Skynyrd. Have you seen it, and did any of that ring true?A: We’ve been following it, (“Roadies” creator) Cameron Crowe toured Lynyrd Skynyrd. And so all of a sudden we heard about this show “Roadies,” and (one of the actors, comic Ron White) is a good friend of ours. My feeling was it was an interesting take on it. Those things get really personal; you really don’t know what to think at the time. I thought it was pretty cool that a whole epsiode was dedicated to a very historic band whose life was cut short by a tragedy.Q: The band also made headlines for playing a show in Cleveland the night before the Republican National Convention. Would you say you’re a particularly political group?A: First of all I’m really about  2/3 to  3/4 Native American, so I have my own felings about politics and politicians. I try not to get involved too much. But when you get hired to be entertainment for whoever, you’re the entertainment.We would have entertained the DNC, if they hired us to do that. We would have done that. We’re hired to entertain people and play the music people love. I am not going to cop an attitude one way or another.The deal is, the band has fans on both sides. So just because somebody believes something different doesn’t mean you have...

Once seen as recession-proof, the funeral industry is in a death spiral. Some owners are staving off the end by ... - Crain's New York Business

Monday, July 25, 2016

Bookings for Catholic wakes went down; requests for alternative ceremonies went up.“I’ve done every kind of funeral under the sun: Wiccan, Apache, Blackfoot, Hindu, Buddhist—you name it,” said Senko, 58. But a couple of years ago, he got a call that surprised him. “They wanted to ‘check out’ our venue—I’d never heard that before,” he said. The caller said the deceased, a lifelong Manhattan resident, had been “extremely hip,” so the funeral needed to be as well. “It had to be in Williamsburg, they said, because it had to be ‘on the cutting edge.’ That was a new one,” Senko recalled. “I told them we’ve been on the cutting edge for a hundred years.”If Williamsburg were to become a hot funeral destination, Senko would be a chief beneficiary: He has the neighborhood’s last funeral parlor north of the Williamsburg Bridge. One by one, his competitors closed: Blizinzki Funeral Home on Metropolitan Avenue, Abramo’s on Humboldt Avenue, Polakas on Berry Street, Matthew Ballas on Grand Street and others since the 1990s.A similar pattern has been playing out across the city. Over two decades, hundreds of funeral homes have shuttered, many of them multigeneration family businesses—neighborhood mainstays who could be counted on to remember old-timers’ nicknames or provide a steady presence to the grieving. Photo: Buck Ennis An urn is placed in a case with handles for pall bearers at Frank E. Campbell funeral chapel. “It’s unbelievable what’s happened,” said Robert Ruggiero, executive director of the Metropolitan Funeral Directors Association, a local trade group. When he took office in 1990, the organization’s directory listed 841 funeral homes...

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Blackfoot baseball player who died in wreck memorialized - Idaho State Journal

Monday, May 01, 2017

BLACKFOOT — Pacen Hayes laid down on Cole Baler’s bed numb to everything around him.The Blackfoot High School senior was surrounded by his baseball teammates, but he never felt more alone. His mind was blank, except for lingering questions about why and how he lost his best friend on Sunday. Hours earlier, Baler was killed in a wreck that occurred around 2 a.m. on Blacktail Road east of Bone Road near Idaho Falls. Baler was a passenger in an SUV being driven by a juvenile female.Baler was a classmate of Hayes, and the two have been playing baseball together since they were 9 years old. On Wednesday, the Broncos’ baseball team honored their late teammate in a home game against Pocatello.AdvertisementBefore the matchup, Baler’s No. 11 jerseys, hat and glove were placed on first base, the position he played for Blackfoot, and given to his mother, Kindra. The Broncos also honored Baler with a ceremonial first pitch from Cayden Cornell. And when Baler’s No. 4 spot came up in the lineup, his...

J. Bruce Wackenhut Obituary - WKBN.com

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Ann Mathieson and her husband, Scott of Aurora, New York and Janet Michaelsen and her husband, Christian of Annandale, Virginia; two sons, Paul B. Wackenhut and his wife, Martha, of Blackfoot, Idaho and Norman C. Wackenhut and his wife, Socorro of South Lake Tahoe, California; nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; first wife and a brother, Norman H. Wackenhut.Calling hours will be held on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Loutzenhiser-Jordan Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Inc., 366-368 S. Main St., Greenville, Pennsylvania. There will also be calling hours prior to services on Wednesday, April 5, 2017 from 10:00 – 10:45 a.m. in Roth Library in Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Funeral services will be Wednesday, April 5, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 1 Trinity Place, Greenville, Pennsylvania with Rev. Lee Penvose, Pastor, officiatingMemorial contributions may be made to Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 1 Trinity Place, Greenville, Pennsylvania 16125 or to the Greenville Public Library, 330 Main St., Greenville, Pennsylvania 16125.To view obituary visit www.loutzenhiserfuneralhomes.com.Order Flowers HereShare this:Related PostsAdvertisement...

Longtime Idaho journalist Michael O'Donnell dies from apparent heart attack - Idaho State Journal

Monday, March 27, 2017

Even though he was retired, he still wrote a weekly column and news stories for the Journal.AdvertisementPrior to working for the Journal, O’Donnell was a teacher at Blackfoot High School. And before that he was the editor of the Morning News newspaper in Blackfoot and the Power County Press newspaper in American Falls.O’Donnell won dozens of journalism awards over the years for his writing.His childhood was spent in Colorado, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa and Canada. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Iowa State University. Then he earned his master’s degree in instructional technology at Idaho State University.He is survived by his wife Jody. They were married for 44 years.Ian Fennell, editor of the Idaho State Journal, said O’Donnell’s death came as a shock to the Journal’s staff.“I had just talked to him on Sunday and he was really enjoying retirement and had a lot of plans for the future,” Fennell said. “Mike was a great writer who cared a lot about people and his community. There were times I can remember when he broke down into tears over a particularly sad story he was covering. There were a lot of times when his columns or his stories would choke me up. He had a talent for capturing the human condition in his writing and relaying that to the readers. That’s what I’ll remember most about him.”Information about O’Donnell’s funeral services will be provided Wednesday.

Obituary: Earl Burke Heaton - Twin Falls Times-News

Monday, February 27, 2017

Tom Cat who will miss him dearly.Burke is survived by his loving wife Carolyn; his children, Debbie (Gerry) Hoyt of Orderville, Utah, Kim (Jannette) Heaton of Highland, Utah, Cathy (Mike) Bostwick of Blackfoot, Idaho, Curtis (Charlene) Heaton of Paradise, Utah, Darla (Brian) Hansen of Standrod, Utah, Jon (Tresa) Heaton of Mapleton, Utah, Jex (Lanise) Heaton of North Ogden, Utah, Rod (Shelley) Heaton of Payson, Utah, Tenaly Bleak of Otis, Colo., Amy (Joey) Wight of Elba, Idaho, Tyler (Robin) Heaton of Panaca, Nev., and Jed (Meshia) Heaton of Standrod, Utah; his numerous grandchildren; two sisters, Elaine Hoyt of Glendale, Utah, and Nanell Mann of Sandy, Utah.He was preceded in death by two sons, Brent Kay Heaton and Guy Elmo Heaton; and one grandson, Porter Earl Heaton. Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inbox .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col{ margin-right: 20px; } .whatcounts-form-container .whatcounts-min .left-col{ max-width: none; margin: 0; } .whatcounts-form-container .disclaimer { font-size: 13px; line-height: 14px; margin-bottom:10px; clear:both; } .whatcounts-form-container .input-group-addon.wc-addon-captcha{ padding: 4px 10px; border-left: 0; } The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, at the Almo LDS Church, with Bishop Jason Tracy officiating. Burial will follow in the Standrod Cemetery.A viewing for family and friends will be held from 6 until 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, at the Almo LDS church and from 10 until 10:45 a.m. Saturday, prior to the service also at the church.Arrangements have been entrusted to the care of the Rasmussen Funeral Home of Burley.

Yeah, don't worry, Lynyrd Skynyrd will play it in Murphys - Modesto Bee

Monday, August 22, 2016

It was for the guys who went before us. When it all came together, it was beautiful.Q: You and other band members have been involved in side projects over the years. Your band Blackfoot recently reformed and released a new album. How important is having that other outlet for you and the band?A: I think it’s very important for everyone to have an outlet. Lynyrd Skynyrd has always been our main project. But Gary and (backing vocalist Dale Krantz-Rossington) have a blues record coming out soon. And Johnny just released a live record with his brother (.38 Special founder Donnie Van Zant). Me and the name I own, Blackfoot, I did something different in that we produced a new record with four young guys for a new generation. We all have to have our outlets. Me, for one, I can’t sit still and sit and home and not do anything after a tour is over.Q: The band is an institution now, what do you think – despite its lineup changes and tragedies – has kept you together over the decades, and what motivates you today?A: Really, to be honest with you, basically it’s the songs themselves. The songs are just such classic tunes that will be here long after I am gone. It’s history. I think that what happens is sometimes we take a lot of heat because people say, “Oh, you aren’t the original group.” That’s true, but there was a bad tragedy that happened and took that original group. You can’t say the original group broke up and all of a sudden we decided to get back together.Tragedies happen in everyone’s lives. You have to sit there and ask yourself – the people who they happened to, would they want the band to carry on the legacy of the group and music? We always ask ourselves that every time we are faced with that and losing someone. And we always believe they would have wanted it to go on and the music to go on. And the fans want it. The day it gets to where the fans quit coming, maybe that’s the day we pull the plug. Maybe that’s the day we look at each other and say, “That’s enough.”Q: The new Showtime rock ’n’ roll series “Roadies” just did an episode that was really an extended story about Lynyrd Skynyrd. Have you seen it, and did any of that ring true?A: We’ve been following it, (“Roadies” creator) Cameron Crowe toured Lynyrd Skynyrd. And so all of a sudden we heard about this show “Roadies,” and (one of the actors, comic Ron White) is a good friend of ours. My feeling was it was an interesting take on it. Those things get really personal; you really don’t know what to think at the time. I thought it was pretty cool that a whole epsiode was dedicated to a very historic band whose life was cut short by a tragedy.Q: The band also made headlines for playing a show in Cleveland the night before the Republican National Convention. Would you say you’re a particularly political group?A: First of all I’m really about  2/3 to  3/4 Native American, so I have my own felings about politics and politicians. I try not to get involved too much. But when you get hired to be entertainment for whoever, you’re the entertainment.We would have entertained the DNC, if they hired us to do that. We would have done that. We’re hired to entertain people and play the music people love. I am not going to cop an attitude one way or another.The deal is, the band has fans on both sides. So just because somebody believes something different doesn’t mean you have...

Once seen as recession-proof, the funeral industry is in a death spiral. Some owners are staving off the end by ... - Crain's New York Business

Monday, July 25, 2016

Bookings for Catholic wakes went down; requests for alternative ceremonies went up.“I’ve done every kind of funeral under the sun: Wiccan, Apache, Blackfoot, Hindu, Buddhist—you name it,” said Senko, 58. But a couple of years ago, he got a call that surprised him. “They wanted to ‘check out’ our venue—I’d never heard that before,” he said. The caller said the deceased, a lifelong Manhattan resident, had been “extremely hip,” so the funeral needed to be as well. “It had to be in Williamsburg, they said, because it had to be ‘on the cutting edge.’ That was a new one,” Senko recalled. “I told them we’ve been on the cutting edge for a hundred years.”If Williamsburg were to become a hot funeral destination, Senko would be a chief beneficiary: He has the neighborhood’s last funeral parlor north of the Williamsburg Bridge. One by one, his competitors closed: Blizinzki Funeral Home on Metropolitan Avenue, Abramo’s on Humboldt Avenue, Polakas on Berry Street, Matthew Ballas on Grand Street and others since the 1990s.A similar pattern has been playing out across the city. Over two decades, hundreds of funeral homes have shuttered, many of them multigeneration family businesses—neighborhood mainstays who could be counted on to remember old-timers’ nicknames or provide a steady presence to the grieving. Photo: Buck Ennis An urn is placed in a case with handles for pall bearers at Frank E. Campbell funeral chapel. “It’s unbelievable what’s happened,” said Robert Ruggiero, executive director of the Metropolitan Funeral Directors Association, a local trade group. When he took office in 1990, the organization’s directory listed 841 funeral homes...