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Denbo Funeral Home

628 East State Road 64
English, IN 47118
(812) 338-2558
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English IN Obituaries and Death Notices

Lowell funeral home places obituary to honor 129 dead in Paris - Lowell Sun

Monday, June 19, 2017

Home in Shrewsbury, and Glenn Burlamachi of the Concord Funeral Home were part of the idea, according to D'Amato.AdvertisementThe obituary ends with duplicate paragraphs, one in French and one in English, which read: "Pray for all those who were killed in Paris, pray for the people of Paris, pray for the people of France, and then pray for an end to such acts of violence." Follow Robert Mills on Twitter and Tout @Robert_Mills.

Gerald R. McDougal, 72, of Morristown - WWNY TV 7

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Central School. Gerald married Joan R. Wilson on October 17, 1964 in Altona, NY. She predeceased him on August 17, 2003. Mr. McDougal and his brother, David, were partners in the family farm on the English Settlement Road in Morristown for many years. Gerald retired in 2000.Gerald enjoyed hunting and fishing.  He also enjoyed spending his mornings at Parkway in Morristown having coffee with his buddies.Donations may be made in Gerald’s memory to the Morristown Vol. Fire and Rescue Co. 1, 200 Morris St. or P.O. Box 4, Morristown, NY 13664 and the Richard E. Winter Cancer Treatment Center, in care ofClaxton-Hepburn Medical Center Foundation, 125 New York Avenue, Ogdensburg, NY 13669.Online condolences may be made at www.fraryfuneralhome.com/obituaries.

Civil-rights activist set example fighting for change - The Detroit News

Monday, May 01, 2017

Detroit. She also was a member of Trade Union Leadership Council.In addition to her work as an activist, Mrs. Brand was a den mother for a Boys Scouts troop on Detroit”s west side. She later taught English as a second language to students in southwest Detroit who immigrated from the Middle East.Born in Philip, Mississippi, Mrs. Brand was raised in Greenwood and graduated from the historic Saints Industrial and Literary School. She was a Sunday school teacher at St. Luke Church of God and Christ. She also was a member of True Vine Church of God in Christ and later St. Cecilia Catholic Church, both in Detroit.A voracious reader, Mrs. Brand’s other hobbies included fishing, cooking and discussing politics. Known for her sharp wit, Mrs. Brand’s family and friends enjoyed her countless one-liners, some of which she delivered in her final days.Other survivors include daughters Betty Rowe, Helen Hendrix and Willa Brand; sons Melvin West, James and Bobby; sisters Martha Williams, Sally Banks, Evelyn Dukes and Carrie Brown; a brother, Guy Rupert; 23 grandchildren; 47 great-grandchildren; and five great-great grandchildren.A daughter, Yvonne Black, a son, Eugene West Jr., and former husbands Eugene West and Willie Brand preceded her in death.Visitation will be 4-6 p.m. Thursday at James H. Cole funeral home, 2624 West Grand Blvd, in Detroit. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Friday at St. Charles Lwanga Catholic Church - St. Leo site, 4860 15th Street at West Grand River in Detroit. Father Theodore Parker will officiate.Burial will be in Lincoln Memorial Park Cemetery in Clinton Township.Read or Share this story: http://detne.ws/2oTHrBK...

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Belgium to organize the immigration of 13 families making their way from the Low Countries of Western Europe to establish a new Catholic colony roughly nine miles east of Valier.Despite few English language skills, rocky soils, little knowledge of Montana’s climate and growing conditions and an early succession of failed crops, the Belgian and Dutch families who settled below what later came to be known as “Belgian Hill” survived and ultimately prospered.The same cannot be said of the church they built by faith and determination, one year before the outbreak of World War I. .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }For 50 years, the bell atop Sacred Heart Church (now more commonly known as the “Old Belgian Church”) rang to celebrate the joy of weddings, tolled to mourn the passing of loved ones, and called the faithful to gather for Sunday Mass.Beginning in the 1950s, attendance at the Old Belgian Church began to decline. Insufficient financial support prompted the Diocese of Helena to close the church in 1963.A few years later, the church bell Monsignor Day had donated with such hope and promise was removed from the Old Belgian Church belfry and carefully placed in a newly built bell tower outside Holy Cross Catholic Church in Dupuyer.One century on, and the bell of Monsignor Day has now served a double life – residing in equal parts at both the Old Belgian Church and at Holy Cross. The question has now become, where is its rightful home?In 2001 a group of descendants of the original Belgian and Dutch colonists came together to rebuild a perimeter fence built to keep wandering cows out of the Old Belgian Church cemetery. It was then that they realized how far into disrepair the long empty church had fallen.The roof was sagging and leaking badly. The plaster lining the church walls had begun to peel away, and its ceiling was close to collapse. Pigeons, mice and bees had made a wreck of the interior.meta itemprop="width" c...

Obituary: Matthew Henry Young, 1948-2017 - Seven Days

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Long Island, and at age 13 asked to go to boarding school. He went to Blair Academy in New Jersey, where he made lifelong friends, and later graduated from Alfred University with a degree in English.Matt briefly attended the New England School of Law in Boston, then got a job managing Dom’s, a high-end northern Italian restaurant on Commercial Street. It was a move that changed the course of his life. Matt had been fascinated from an early age by what was happening in the kitchen, and had long wanted to run a restaurant. He stayed at Dom’s for seven or so years.Matt finally opened his own restaurant, the Ocean Club, on Martha’s Vineyard in 1979. Influenced by the cuisine at Dom’s, his place became famous for its innovative gourmet food. It was also the go-to cool spot, frequented by locals as well as the island’s famous summer residents, including Lillian Hellman, John Belushi, Carly Simon, Jackie Onassis, William Styron and many others. Going to the Ocean Club meant having a good time — some said it was “like an event” — and the restaurant became legendary. Matt was the designer of it all.In 1985, some investors approached Matt asking him to open a second restaurant. And he did: the Cambridge Ocean Club in the Charles Hotel. During the time that he ran it, a local magazine named Matt one of Boston’s 100 most eligible bachelors.But flying back and forth between the two locations became too much. And back ...

Obituary: John L. Moe - La Crosse Tribune

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Caitlin Miller. He is also survived by a brother, Clarence Justin; a sister, Barbara Jerome; a sister-in-law, Marilyn Carroll; and numerous niece and nephews. John also leaves behind his beloved English setter Molly, Chessie the cat and Remington, his daughter’s Springer.The family wishes to thank Drs. Onsrud, Price and Adams for the wonderful care given to John over the years and Drs. Patch and Forbes and the staffs of 9th, 7th and ICU, pastoral care, especially the Rev. Mark Carr and palliative care at Mayo for the kind and compassionate care given to John over the last 11 days of his life.Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 29, at Coulee Region Cremation Group, 133 Mason St., Onalaska. A prayer service will follow at 7 p.m. Msgr. Kachel will officiate. Private inurnment will follow at Woodlawn Cemetery at a later date.In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made in John’s memory to either the Coulee Region Humane Society or Cashton Public Schools.“He was a man, take him for all and all. I shall not look upon his like again.”...

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Lowell funeral home places obituary to honor 129 dead in Paris - Lowell Sun

Monday, June 19, 2017

Home in Shrewsbury, and Glenn Burlamachi of the Concord Funeral Home were part of the idea, according to D'Amato.AdvertisementThe obituary ends with duplicate paragraphs, one in French and one in English, which read: "Pray for all those who were killed in Paris, pray for the people of Paris, pray for the people of France, and then pray for an end to such acts of violence." Follow Robert Mills on Twitter and Tout @Robert_Mills.

Gerald R. McDougal, 72, of Morristown - WWNY TV 7

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Central School. Gerald married Joan R. Wilson on October 17, 1964 in Altona, NY. She predeceased him on August 17, 2003. Mr. McDougal and his brother, David, were partners in the family farm on the English Settlement Road in Morristown for many years. Gerald retired in 2000.Gerald enjoyed hunting and fishing.  He also enjoyed spending his mornings at Parkway in Morristown having coffee with his buddies.Donations may be made in Gerald’s memory to the Morristown Vol. Fire and Rescue Co. 1, 200 Morris St. or P.O. Box 4, Morristown, NY 13664 and the Richard E. Winter Cancer Treatment Center, in care ofClaxton-Hepburn Medical Center Foundation, 125 New York Avenue, Ogdensburg, NY 13669.Online condolences may be made at www.fraryfuneralhome.com/obituaries.

Civil-rights activist set example fighting for change - The Detroit News

Monday, May 01, 2017

Detroit. She also was a member of Trade Union Leadership Council.In addition to her work as an activist, Mrs. Brand was a den mother for a Boys Scouts troop on Detroit”s west side. She later taught English as a second language to students in southwest Detroit who immigrated from the Middle East.Born in Philip, Mississippi, Mrs. Brand was raised in Greenwood and graduated from the historic Saints Industrial and Literary School. She was a Sunday school teacher at St. Luke Church of God and Christ. She also was a member of True Vine Church of God in Christ and later St. Cecilia Catholic Church, both in Detroit.A voracious reader, Mrs. Brand’s other hobbies included fishing, cooking and discussing politics. Known for her sharp wit, Mrs. Brand’s family and friends enjoyed her countless one-liners, some of which she delivered in her final days.Other survivors include daughters Betty Rowe, Helen Hendrix and Willa Brand; sons Melvin West, James and Bobby; sisters Martha Williams, Sally Banks, Evelyn Dukes and Carrie Brown; a brother, Guy Rupert; 23 grandchildren; 47 great-grandchildren; and five great-great grandchildren.A daughter, Yvonne Black, a son, Eugene West Jr., and former husbands Eugene West and Willie Brand preceded her in death.Visitation will be 4-6 p.m. Thursday at James H. Cole funeral home, 2624 West Grand Blvd, in Detroit. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Friday at St. Charles Lwanga Catholic Church - St. Leo site, 4860 15th Street at West Grand River in Detroit. Father Theodore Parker will officiate.Burial will be in Lincoln Memorial Park Cemetery in Clinton Township.Read or Share this story: http://detne.ws/2oTHrBK...

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Belgium to organize the immigration of 13 families making their way from the Low Countries of Western Europe to establish a new Catholic colony roughly nine miles east of Valier.Despite few English language skills, rocky soils, little knowledge of Montana’s climate and growing conditions and an early succession of failed crops, the Belgian and Dutch families who settled below what later came to be known as “Belgian Hill” survived and ultimately prospered.The same cannot be said of the church they built by faith and determination, one year before the outbreak of World War I. .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }For 50 years, the bell atop Sacred Heart Church (now more commonly known as the “Old Belgian Church”) rang to celebrate the joy of weddings, tolled to mourn the passing of loved ones, and called the faithful to gather for Sunday Mass.Beginning in the 1950s, attendance at the Old Belgian Church began to decline. Insufficient financial support prompted the Diocese of Helena to close the church in 1963.A few years later, the church bell Monsignor Day had donated with such hope and promise was removed from the Old Belgian Church belfry and carefully placed in a newly built bell tower outside Holy Cross Catholic Church in Dupuyer.One century on, and the bell of Monsignor Day has now served a double life – residing in equal parts at both the Old Belgian Church and at Holy Cross. The question has now become, where is its rightful home?In 2001 a group of descendants of the original Belgian and Dutch colonists came together to rebuild a perimeter fence built to keep wandering cows out of the Old Belgian Church cemetery. It was then that they realized how far into disrepair the long empty church had fallen.The roof was sagging and leaking badly. The plaster lining the church walls had begun to peel away, and its ceiling was close to collapse. Pigeons, mice and bees had made a wreck of the interior.meta itemprop="width" c...

Obituary: Matthew Henry Young, 1948-2017 - Seven Days

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Long Island, and at age 13 asked to go to boarding school. He went to Blair Academy in New Jersey, where he made lifelong friends, and later graduated from Alfred University with a degree in English.Matt briefly attended the New England School of Law in Boston, then got a job managing Dom’s, a high-end northern Italian restaurant on Commercial Street. It was a move that changed the course of his life. Matt had been fascinated from an early age by what was happening in the kitchen, and had long wanted to run a restaurant. He stayed at Dom’s for seven or so years.Matt finally opened his own restaurant, the Ocean Club, on Martha’s Vineyard in 1979. Influenced by the cuisine at Dom’s, his place became famous for its innovative gourmet food. It was also the go-to cool spot, frequented by locals as well as the island’s famous summer residents, including Lillian Hellman, John Belushi, Carly Simon, Jackie Onassis, William Styron and many others. Going to the Ocean Club meant having a good time — some said it was “like an event” — and the restaurant became legendary. Matt was the designer of it all.In 1985, some investors approached Matt asking him to open a second restaurant. And he did: the Cambridge Ocean Club in the Charles Hotel. During the time that he ran it, a local magazine named Matt one of Boston’s 100 most eligible bachelors.But flying back and forth between the two locations became too much. And back ...

Obituary: John L. Moe - La Crosse Tribune

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Caitlin Miller. He is also survived by a brother, Clarence Justin; a sister, Barbara Jerome; a sister-in-law, Marilyn Carroll; and numerous niece and nephews. John also leaves behind his beloved English setter Molly, Chessie the cat and Remington, his daughter’s Springer.The family wishes to thank Drs. Onsrud, Price and Adams for the wonderful care given to John over the years and Drs. Patch and Forbes and the staffs of 9th, 7th and ICU, pastoral care, especially the Rev. Mark Carr and palliative care at Mayo for the kind and compassionate care given to John over the last 11 days of his life.Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 29, at Coulee Region Cremation Group, 133 Mason St., Onalaska. A prayer service will follow at 7 p.m. Msgr. Kachel will officiate. Private inurnment will follow at Woodlawn Cemetery at a later date.In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made in John’s memory to either the Coulee Region Humane Society or Cashton Public Schools.“He was a man, take him for all and all. I shall not look upon his like again.”...