Rensselaer IN Funeral Homes

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Jackson Transfer Service

250 North McKinley Avenue
Rensselaer, IN 47978
(219) 866-5123
Jackson Transfer Service funeral flowers

Memory Gardens

250 North McKinley Avenue
Rensselaer, IN 47978
(219) 866-5125
Memory Gardens funeral flowers

Rensselaer IN Obituaries and Death Notices

Avon Obituary: Philip Rotondo, 82 - Patch.com

Monday, June 19, 2017

After Avon Old Farms, he went on to study civil engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and eventually earned a Masters and PhD in civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He spent two years in the US Coast and Geodetic Survey, and told a story about being on watch one night and nearly getting knocked overboard by a flying fish. Phil worked for nearly four decades at Combustion Engineering where he earned a reputation as the guy who could solve any problem. He also launched entrepreneurial ventures for which he earned several patents.Long time Avon residents may remember the Rotondo Pizza House which Phil ran with his parents. He was in charge of making the pizzas and recently calculated that he had made over 250,000 pizzas in his lifetime. His love of cooking and pizza-making extended to later in his life when he became famous for the polenta and pizza parties he held at the home he designed and built himself, complete with a brick pizza oven in the central chimney. The one thing he ever allowed himself to boast about were his pizza making skills.Phil played the piano beautifully, always trying to master Chopin, and enjoyed playing the accordion as well. He organized and performed in waterski shows and had a pilot's license he used to take family and friends on flights around New England.

Music|Pauline Oliveros, Composer Who Championed 'Deep Listening,' Dies at 84 - New York Times

Monday, December 12, 2016

In 2014, the institute merged with the Center for Deep Listening at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y.In her final decades Ms. Oliveros formed close bonds with groups like the International Contemporary Ensemble, which brought her work closer to the mainstream canon with performances at Lincoln Center, Miller Theater at Columbia University and elsewhere.“I’m not dismissive of classical music and the Western canon,” Ms. Oliveros said in 2012. “It’s simply that I can’t be bound by it. I’ve been jumping out of categories all my life.”Pauline Oliveros was born on May 30, 1932, in Houston to John Oliveros and Edith Gutierrez. Her childhood was accompanied by the sounds of piano lessons taught by her mother and grandmother, bird song and buzzing cicadas, and the curious special effects used on favorite radio serials like “Buck Rogers” and “The Shadow.”Taking up the accordion as her principal instrument, she also learned to play violin, piano, French horn and tuba.At 20 Ms. Oliveros moved to California in search of a compositional mentor. She found one in Robert Erickson, a prominent composer, who as the music director of KPFA-FM, a Berkeley radio station, introduced Bay Area listeners to the latest trends in European avant-garde composition.She explored free improvisation with colleagues like the composer Terry Riley and the bassist and koto player Loren Rush in the late 1950s, and joined Ramon Sender and Morton Subotnick at the trailblazing San Francisco Tape Music Center, founded in 1962.When the center was absorbed by Mills College in 1966, Ms. Oliveros served for a year as its director. In 1967 she joined the faculty at the University of California, San Diego, where she taught until 1981. From 2001 she served as distinguished research professor of music at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her honors include a John Cage Award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts.In addition to her spouse, Ms. Oliveros is survived by three stepchildren, Alessandro Bovoso, Nico Bovoso and Antonio Bovoso; a brother, John Oliveros, and eight grandchildren.Correction: November 30, 2016An obituary on Monday about the composer Pauline Oliveros misstated part of the name of the organization that presented her with the John Cage Award. It is the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, not the Foundation...

Eugene R. (Gene) Kosakowski - Newbritainherald

Monday, August 01, 2016

Gianna and Maximus.He was predeceased by his wife, Wanda.Gene was born on Feb. 26, 1928, in New Britain, to Alexander and Wanda Kosakowski.He graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1950 with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering.He married Wanda in 1954 and they remained together until her passing in 1984. We hope that they are together again. Gene spent most of his professional career at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft; first in East Hartford and subsequently in West Palm Beach, Fla.He was especially proud of his work on the first fuel cells which were used in the Apollo Lunar Missions.Gene was an accomplished athlete in his youth and often boasted of being offered a minor league baseball contract with the Saint Louis Cardinals which his mother Wanda forcefully refused his accepting as she insisted he go to college.Gene was a life-long Red Sox fan and was happy to fly up from Florida to celebrate in Boston with his son and grandson Jason when the Sox reversed the curse in 2004.He will be long remembered for his love for his children and family. The memories of the many family trips and vacations will be with us forever.All who knew him will remember the many tales he told of the adventures of his youth and time in college at RPI.Calling hours are scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2016, from 4 to 7 p.m., at New Britain Memorial Sagarino Funeral Home, 444 Farmington Ave. New Britain (directions, exit 37 off I-84 ta...

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Avon Obituary: Philip Rotondo, 82 - Patch.com

Monday, June 19, 2017

After Avon Old Farms, he went on to study civil engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and eventually earned a Masters and PhD in civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He spent two years in the US Coast and Geodetic Survey, and told a story about being on watch one night and nearly getting knocked overboard by a flying fish. Phil worked for nearly four decades at Combustion Engineering where he earned a reputation as the guy who could solve any problem. He also launched entrepreneurial ventures for which he earned several patents.Long time Avon residents may remember the Rotondo Pizza House which Phil ran with his parents. He was in charge of making the pizzas and recently calculated that he had made over 250,000 pizzas in his lifetime. His love of cooking and pizza-making extended to later in his life when he became famous for the polenta and pizza parties he held at the home he designed and built himself, complete with a brick pizza oven in the central chimney. The one thing he ever allowed himself to boast about were his pizza making skills.Phil played the piano beautifully, always trying to master Chopin, and enjoyed playing the accordion as well. He organized and performed in waterski shows and had a pilot's license he used to take family and friends on flights around New England.

Music|Pauline Oliveros, Composer Who Championed 'Deep Listening,' Dies at 84 - New York Times

Monday, December 12, 2016

In 2014, the institute merged with the Center for Deep Listening at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y.In her final decades Ms. Oliveros formed close bonds with groups like the International Contemporary Ensemble, which brought her work closer to the mainstream canon with performances at Lincoln Center, Miller Theater at Columbia University and elsewhere.“I’m not dismissive of classical music and the Western canon,” Ms. Oliveros said in 2012. “It’s simply that I can’t be bound by it. I’ve been jumping out of categories all my life.”Pauline Oliveros was born on May 30, 1932, in Houston to John Oliveros and Edith Gutierrez. Her childhood was accompanied by the sounds of piano lessons taught by her mother and grandmother, bird song and buzzing cicadas, and the curious special effects used on favorite radio serials like “Buck Rogers” and “The Shadow.”Taking up the accordion as her principal instrument, she also learned to play violin, piano, French horn and tuba.At 20 Ms. Oliveros moved to California in search of a compositional mentor. She found one in Robert Erickson, a prominent composer, who as the music director of KPFA-FM, a Berkeley radio station, introduced Bay Area listeners to the latest trends in European avant-garde composition.She explored free improvisation with colleagues like the composer Terry Riley and the bassist and koto player Loren Rush in the late 1950s, and joined Ramon Sender and Morton Subotnick at the trailblazing San Francisco Tape Music Center, founded in 1962.When the center was absorbed by Mills College in 1966, Ms. Oliveros served for a year as its director. In 1967 she joined the faculty at the University of California, San Diego, where she taught until 1981. From 2001 she served as distinguished research professor of music at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her honors include a John Cage Award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts.In addition to her spouse, Ms. Oliveros is survived by three stepchildren, Alessandro Bovoso, Nico Bovoso and Antonio Bovoso; a brother, John Oliveros, and eight grandchildren.Correction: November 30, 2016An obituary on Monday about the composer Pauline Oliveros misstated part of the name of the organization that presented her with the John Cage Award. It is the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, not the Foundation...

Eugene R. (Gene) Kosakowski - Newbritainherald

Monday, August 01, 2016

Gianna and Maximus.He was predeceased by his wife, Wanda.Gene was born on Feb. 26, 1928, in New Britain, to Alexander and Wanda Kosakowski.He graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1950 with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering.He married Wanda in 1954 and they remained together until her passing in 1984. We hope that they are together again. Gene spent most of his professional career at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft; first in East Hartford and subsequently in West Palm Beach, Fla.He was especially proud of his work on the first fuel cells which were used in the Apollo Lunar Missions.Gene was an accomplished athlete in his youth and often boasted of being offered a minor league baseball contract with the Saint Louis Cardinals which his mother Wanda forcefully refused his accepting as she insisted he go to college.Gene was a life-long Red Sox fan and was happy to fly up from Florida to celebrate in Boston with his son and grandson Jason when the Sox reversed the curse in 2004.He will be long remembered for his love for his children and family. The memories of the many family trips and vacations will be with us forever.All who knew him will remember the many tales he told of the adventures of his youth and time in college at RPI.Calling hours are scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2016, from 4 to 7 p.m., at New Britain Memorial Sagarino Funeral Home, 444 Farmington Ave. New Britain (directions, exit 37 off I-84 ta...