Rushville IN Funeral Homes

Rushville IN funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about East Hill Cemetery Association , Moster and Cox Mortuary by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Rushville funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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East Hill Cemetery Association

704 East State Road 44
Rushville, IN 46173
(765) 932-3055
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Moster and Cox Mortuary

334 North Main Street Suite 1
Rushville, IN 46173
(765) 932-3914
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Rushville IN Obituaries and Death Notices

St. John's Lutheran Church celebrates 120th anniversary - Rapid City Journal

Monday, August 15, 2016

Smithwick.During the first 25 years of St. John’s, there were 10 different pastors serving the congregation.From 1900 until 1914, these preachers would commute 80 miles one way via train, coming from Rushville, Neb., where a joint parish had been established, to preach the word to St. John’s parishioners. Sometimes, it was three weeks between services, due to the distances and difficulty of travel, according to Ferguson.In 1914, the Smithwick congregation made plans to replace the farmhouse in which they held services with a new church building. This church was completed and dedicated in August of 1915. It included a 700-pound steeple bell, cast in eastern South Dakota – the same bell that calls parishioners to worship in the Maverick Junction church. The dedication service of this new church included a sermon in both German and English. Ferguson also notes that the first written records of the church were in German, at least through 1915.Oddly, immediately after its dedication, the church’s doors were barred by a court order, due to the contractor failing to pay his laborers and for materials, a total of $1,000. While this might not seem like much today, it took a valiant effort by the congregation – through October of 1919 – to raise this fee. During this time, services were again held in homes, and Ferguson calls this a “trying time” for the church.When the debts were paid, the church building redeemed, the Rushville and Smithwick parishes called on Pastor H. L. Woebler to lead them. Stories about Woebler literally jumping off the train from Rushville, as it went through Smithwick, were told. Woebler stayed 10 years, longer than any other St. John’s pastor.During the 1920s and 30s, the church abbreviated its official name, to become St. John’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church. Men sat on one side of not-cushioned pews, women on the other, according to Ferguson, prompting many a squirm during long sermons. He also notes how during Christmas programs, children portraying shepherds, had to wear scratchy bathrobes and be careful not to be burned by standing too close to the pot-bellied stove. Still church functions and activities grew.By 1946, with the church growing, a relocation to Oral was considered, according to Ferguson, especially since Oral was to be receiving irrigation water from the soon-to-be-built Angostura Reservoir. Its dam was built in 1949, backing up Cheyenne River waters to cover some 4,400 acres up to 75 feet deep. But the congregation stayed in Smithwick.The church was remodeled in 1952, the pulpit lowered, the woodwork, pews and floors refinished, and a furnace installed in the basement.Also during the early 1950s, Lutheran churches were started in Gordon and Chadron, Neb. St. John’s partnered with these churches. However, in 1956, St. Johns went solo, became a one-point parish, led by Pastor Eugene Tjirks. Tjirks and his family lived in VA housing in Hot Springs until a new, $16,000 parsonage – it cost the congregation half this, because volunteer labor built it – was completed.In 1962, St. Johns again split its minister with Our Savoir’s Lutheran Church in Hermosa, and became a member of the South Dakota Lutheran District, instead of the Nebraska and Colorado-based Central District.By 1966, however, says Ferguson, St. John’s was at a crossroads and needed to make some hard decisions. One decision was how to keep the Smithwick church alive, because it was rapidly losing members and had...

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St. John's Lutheran Church celebrates 120th anniversary - Rapid City Journal

Monday, August 15, 2016

Smithwick.During the first 25 years of St. John’s, there were 10 different pastors serving the congregation.From 1900 until 1914, these preachers would commute 80 miles one way via train, coming from Rushville, Neb., where a joint parish had been established, to preach the word to St. John’s parishioners. Sometimes, it was three weeks between services, due to the distances and difficulty of travel, according to Ferguson.In 1914, the Smithwick congregation made plans to replace the farmhouse in which they held services with a new church building. This church was completed and dedicated in August of 1915. It included a 700-pound steeple bell, cast in eastern South Dakota – the same bell that calls parishioners to worship in the Maverick Junction church. The dedication service of this new church included a sermon in both German and English. Ferguson also notes that the first written records of the church were in German, at least through 1915.Oddly, immediately after its dedication, the church’s doors were barred by a court order, due to the contractor failing to pay his laborers and for materials, a total of $1,000. While this might not seem like much today, it took a valiant effort by the congregation – through October of 1919 – to raise this fee. During this time, services were again held in homes, and Ferguson calls this a “trying time” for the church.When the debts were paid, the church building redeemed, the Rushville and Smithwick parishes called on Pastor H. L. Woebler to lead them. Stories about Woebler literally jumping off the train from Rushville, as it went through Smithwick, were told. Woebler stayed 10 years, longer than any other St. John’s pastor.During the 1920s and 30s, the church abbreviated its official name, to become St. John’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church. Men sat on one side of not-cushioned pews, women on the other, according to Ferguson, prompting many a squirm during long sermons. He also notes how during Christmas programs, children portraying shepherds, had to wear scratchy bathrobes and be careful not to be burned by standing too close to the pot-bellied stove. Still church functions and activities grew.By 1946, with the church growing, a relocation to Oral was considered, according to Ferguson, especially since Oral was to be receiving irrigation water from the soon-to-be-built Angostura Reservoir. Its dam was built in 1949, backing up Cheyenne River waters to cover some 4,400 acres up to 75 feet deep. But the congregation stayed in Smithwick.The church was remodeled in 1952, the pulpit lowered, the woodwork, pews and floors refinished, and a furnace installed in the basement.Also during the early 1950s, Lutheran churches were started in Gordon and Chadron, Neb. St. John’s partnered with these churches. However, in 1956, St. Johns went solo, became a one-point parish, led by Pastor Eugene Tjirks. Tjirks and his family lived in VA housing in Hot Springs until a new, $16,000 parsonage – it cost the congregation half this, because volunteer labor built it – was completed.In 1962, St. Johns again split its minister with Our Savoir’s Lutheran Church in Hermosa, and became a member of the South Dakota Lutheran District, instead of the Nebraska and Colorado-based Central District.By 1966, however, says Ferguson, St. John’s was at a crossroads and needed to make some hard decisions. One decision was how to keep the Smithwick church alive, because it was rapidly losing members and had...