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Hertz Funeral Home

420 South Oak Street
Carson, IA 51525
(712) 484-2283
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Carson IA Obituaries and Death Notices

Charles Cooper - New Virginia - Osceola Sentinel Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Indianola; grandchildren, Megan (Kyle Savage) Boutwell, Jaci Boutwell, Jessika (Manuel) Flores, Dilan Boutwell, Brandon (Rebecca) Lundy, Kelsi Lundy, Brooke Lundy, Jenna Lundy, Kaylee Cooper, Carson Cooper, Zoey Harmon, Annie Harmon and soon-to-be grandson Charlie Alan, due in August; eight great-grandchildren with another great-granddaughter due in May; brothers, Sonny (Mithes) Parker of Melcher, David (Fayetta) Cooper of Redfield, Bill (Rosie) Cooper of Melcher, Donnie (Jane) Cooper of Des Moines and Eddie Fleming; sisters, Jackie (Johnny) Vanderick of Williamson, Snooky (Mike) Mathes of Milo and Dianna Graham of Norwalk; sisters-in-law, Connie Felton of Indianola and Diana McDole of New Virginia; brother-in-law Merle Felton of New Virginia; mother-in-law Doris Jean Holm of Norwalk; as well as other relatives and many friends.Chuck was preceded in death by his parents; wife Cynthia Ann Cooper; brothers, Johnny Cooper, Jimmy Cooper and Bryce Cooper and sisters, Rose Gruder, Pauline McCully, Joann Breese, Eloise Mullen and Ruby Flanders. Comments...

Ronald Eggers

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Survivors include two sons, Rodney and his wife Dawn of Louisburg, Kansas, Rick and his wife Shyla of Stillwater, Oklahoma, four granddaughters, Jordan, Alexandra, Carson and Emily, two sisters, Evelyn Wyssmann and Evonne Gash, in-laws, John and Darla Schminke, numerous nieces and nephews and his dear friend, Barbara Janssen. He was preceded in death by his wife, Kay, his parents, a sister Elaine Eggers, an infant sister and two brothers-in-law, Homer Wyssmann and Charles Gash. Memorial contributions may be made to Zion Lutheran Church with Ladusau-Evans Funeral Home custodian of the funds. Family and friends may leave online condolences or view the service at www.ladusauevans.com.

James Morland

Saturday, April 08, 2017

American Legion, Roscoe Enloe Post 5, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Roy Sone Post 1003 and a lifetime member of the Disabled American Veterans.Other survivors include: his daughters, Lori Carson and her husband, Thomas, of Holts Summit; Rainie Autrey and her husband, Steve, of Boonville; a step-son, Roger Baumbach and his wife Gale, of Murfreesboro, TN; three sisters; one brother; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild, with another due in June; three step-grandchildren; five step-great-grandchildren with another due in June; and his mother-in-law, Beatrice Baumbach of Gerald.He was predeceased by his parents, father-in-law, Erwin Baumbach, and a brother, Steven Jay Morland.Visitation will be held at Freeman Mortuary from 4:00 to 8:00 Tuesday, March 28, 2017.Funeral services will be conducted at 11:00 am Wednesday, March 29, 2017 in the Freeman Chapel with Pastor Joshua Hartley officiating. Graveside services with military honors will be held at the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Boone County.In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make memorial contributions to the James Morland Memorial Fund c/o Mid-America Bank, 580 Karen Drive, Holts Summit, Missouri 65043. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Freeman Mortuary.

Don Rickles, Comedy's Equal Opportunity Offender, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

He spent a decade in the comedy trenches before he broke through to a national audience.In 1965, he made the first of numerous appearances on “The Tonight Show,” treating Johnny Carson with his trademark disdain to the audience’s (and Carson’s) delight. He also became a regular on Dean Martin’s televised roasts, where no celebrity was safe from his onslaughts. (“What’s Bob Hope doing here? Is the war over?”)Mr. Rickles’s wife, who he said “likes to lie in bed, signaling ships with her jewelry,” was not immune to his attacks. Neither was his mother, Etta, whom he referred to as “the Jewish Patton.” But off the stage, he didn’t hesitate to express his gratitude to his mother for unflaggingly believing in his talent, even when he himself wasn’t so sure.“She had a tremendous drive,” he recalled in “Mr. Warmth.” “Drove me crazy. But she was like the driving force for me.”He shared an apartment with his mother and did not marry until he was almost 40. After marrying Barbara Sklar in 1965, he saw to it that his mother had the apartment next door. His wife survives him, as do a daughter, Mindy Mann, and two grandchildren. Mr. Rickles’s son, Lawrence, died in 2011.Donald Jay Rickles was born in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens on May 8, 1926, to Max Rickles, an insurance salesman, and the former Etta Feldman. During World War II, he honed his comedic skills while serving in the Navy. (“On the ship that I went over to the Philippines,” he told The New York Times in 2015, “out of 300 men I was the class comedian.”) After being discharged, he followed his father into the insurance business, but when he had trouble getting his customers to sign on the dotted line, decided to try acting.He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, an experience that he later said gave him a greater sense of himself. But he found it difficult to get acting jobs and turned to stand-up comedy.For a while, he pursued acting and comedy simultaneously. He did his stand-up act at Catskills resorts and in strip clubs, and his movie career got off to an auspicious start with a small part in the 1958 submarine drama “Run Silent, Run Deep,” starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. But the bulk of his film work in the 1960s was in low-budget beach movies: “Bikini Beach,” “Muscle Beach Party” and “Pajama Party,” all in 1964, and “Beach Blanket Bingo” in 1965.By that time, his comedy career had begun gathering momentum. Focusing less on prepared material and more on interaction with his audience, he had found his voice. He was not the first insult comedian — and in fact an earlier master of the comic insult, Jack E. Leonard, was known to complain that Mr. Rickles’s act was too similar to his — but he soon became far and away the most successful.Bookings in the late 1950s at the Slate Brothers nightclub in Hollywood and the lounge of the Sahara Hotel in Las Vegas spread the word. During his Slate Brothers engagement, Carl Reiner recalled in “Mr. Warmth,” the biggest names in show business felt that “if they hadn’t been insulted by Rickles, they weren’t with it.”His appearances insulting celebrities on the Dean Martin roasts and his sparring matches with Carson cemented Mr. Rickles’s reputation, but his unscripted brand of humor proved an uneasy fit for weekly television. A variety show in 1968 and a situation comedy in 1972, both called “The Don Rickles Show,” were short-lived, as was “Daddy Dearest,” a 1993 sitcom in which he and the comedian Richard Lewis played father and son. The closest thing to a hit show he had was “CPO Sharkey,” a Navy comedy, which aired from 1976 to 1978.Critics were often not sure what to make of Mr. Rickles. John J. O’Connor of The Times wrote in 1972 that for some his humor “will always remain tasteless,” while for others “it has its delicious moments of madness.” Tom Shales of The Washington Post, 26 years later, was more enthusiastic, ...

Donald Vincent Pinky, 82, De Soto - Leader Publications

Monday, April 03, 2017

Jeff (Brandi) Swyers, Nathan Swyers, Jeremy (TinaJo Hadley) Weir, Lindsey (Mike) Hensley and Christopher (Teresa) Pinkley; five great-grandchildren: LillyAnn, Tucker, Josie, Carson, Avery and one on the way; and four nieces and nephews: Scotty, Bobby, Joanie and Sandy.Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Sunday, March 26, at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, in St. Louis County. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. on Monday, March 27, at the funeral home. Burial will be at Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis. Arrangements are under the direction of Kutis South County Chapel.

Connie Woodbury - Bismarck Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

Hull in Fargo. She grew up on a farm near Ayr. She attended school in town and graduated from Ayr High School. After several years of college at the University of North Dakota, Connie took a job in Carson, with the soil conservation district. It was here where Connie met Alan Woodbury, and the two were united in marriage on Nov. 27, 1965 in Ayr. They moved to Fargo where they lived in married student housing while Alan attended school, and Connie worked for the Soil Conservation District. They later moved to Dickinson where they made their home ever since. It was here where they raised their family of four children.Connie worked with Alan at Woody’s Feed & Grain for 12 years before taking on her most cherished role of wife, mother and grandmother. She worked part time at Herberger’s for several years, where Connie enjoyed selling shoes.Her greatest joy in life was getting together with her beloved family and following her children and grandchildren in their activities. Holidays were Connie’s favorite time of year, and she took pride in organizing her family’s events. Connie enjoyed baking, especially delicious sweets.Connie enjoyed the Coffee Club she was involved in for many years and treasured the friendships that she made there. Connie loved to travel and was willing to fly anywhere. She enjoyed going out to dinner with Alan. Connie was an avid shopper, especially for Christmas presents and shoes. When her health kept her in, she became an expert at online shopping as well.In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials be given in care of the Connie Woodbury Memorial at CHI St. Alexius Health, Dickinson, foundation or First Congregational Church, Dickinson...

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Charles Cooper - New Virginia - Osceola Sentinel Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Indianola; grandchildren, Megan (Kyle Savage) Boutwell, Jaci Boutwell, Jessika (Manuel) Flores, Dilan Boutwell, Brandon (Rebecca) Lundy, Kelsi Lundy, Brooke Lundy, Jenna Lundy, Kaylee Cooper, Carson Cooper, Zoey Harmon, Annie Harmon and soon-to-be grandson Charlie Alan, due in August; eight great-grandchildren with another great-granddaughter due in May; brothers, Sonny (Mithes) Parker of Melcher, David (Fayetta) Cooper of Redfield, Bill (Rosie) Cooper of Melcher, Donnie (Jane) Cooper of Des Moines and Eddie Fleming; sisters, Jackie (Johnny) Vanderick of Williamson, Snooky (Mike) Mathes of Milo and Dianna Graham of Norwalk; sisters-in-law, Connie Felton of Indianola and Diana McDole of New Virginia; brother-in-law Merle Felton of New Virginia; mother-in-law Doris Jean Holm of Norwalk; as well as other relatives and many friends.Chuck was preceded in death by his parents; wife Cynthia Ann Cooper; brothers, Johnny Cooper, Jimmy Cooper and Bryce Cooper and sisters, Rose Gruder, Pauline McCully, Joann Breese, Eloise Mullen and Ruby Flanders. Comments...

Ronald Eggers

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Survivors include two sons, Rodney and his wife Dawn of Louisburg, Kansas, Rick and his wife Shyla of Stillwater, Oklahoma, four granddaughters, Jordan, Alexandra, Carson and Emily, two sisters, Evelyn Wyssmann and Evonne Gash, in-laws, John and Darla Schminke, numerous nieces and nephews and his dear friend, Barbara Janssen. He was preceded in death by his wife, Kay, his parents, a sister Elaine Eggers, an infant sister and two brothers-in-law, Homer Wyssmann and Charles Gash. Memorial contributions may be made to Zion Lutheran Church with Ladusau-Evans Funeral Home custodian of the funds. Family and friends may leave online condolences or view the service at www.ladusauevans.com.

James Morland

Saturday, April 08, 2017

American Legion, Roscoe Enloe Post 5, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Roy Sone Post 1003 and a lifetime member of the Disabled American Veterans.Other survivors include: his daughters, Lori Carson and her husband, Thomas, of Holts Summit; Rainie Autrey and her husband, Steve, of Boonville; a step-son, Roger Baumbach and his wife Gale, of Murfreesboro, TN; three sisters; one brother; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild, with another due in June; three step-grandchildren; five step-great-grandchildren with another due in June; and his mother-in-law, Beatrice Baumbach of Gerald.He was predeceased by his parents, father-in-law, Erwin Baumbach, and a brother, Steven Jay Morland.Visitation will be held at Freeman Mortuary from 4:00 to 8:00 Tuesday, March 28, 2017.Funeral services will be conducted at 11:00 am Wednesday, March 29, 2017 in the Freeman Chapel with Pastor Joshua Hartley officiating. Graveside services with military honors will be held at the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Boone County.In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make memorial contributions to the James Morland Memorial Fund c/o Mid-America Bank, 580 Karen Drive, Holts Summit, Missouri 65043. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Freeman Mortuary.

Don Rickles, Comedy's Equal Opportunity Offender, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

He spent a decade in the comedy trenches before he broke through to a national audience.In 1965, he made the first of numerous appearances on “The Tonight Show,” treating Johnny Carson with his trademark disdain to the audience’s (and Carson’s) delight. He also became a regular on Dean Martin’s televised roasts, where no celebrity was safe from his onslaughts. (“What’s Bob Hope doing here? Is the war over?”)Mr. Rickles’s wife, who he said “likes to lie in bed, signaling ships with her jewelry,” was not immune to his attacks. Neither was his mother, Etta, whom he referred to as “the Jewish Patton.” But off the stage, he didn’t hesitate to express his gratitude to his mother for unflaggingly believing in his talent, even when he himself wasn’t so sure.“She had a tremendous drive,” he recalled in “Mr. Warmth.” “Drove me crazy. But she was like the driving force for me.”He shared an apartment with his mother and did not marry until he was almost 40. After marrying Barbara Sklar in 1965, he saw to it that his mother had the apartment next door. His wife survives him, as do a daughter, Mindy Mann, and two grandchildren. Mr. Rickles’s son, Lawrence, died in 2011.Donald Jay Rickles was born in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens on May 8, 1926, to Max Rickles, an insurance salesman, and the former Etta Feldman. During World War II, he honed his comedic skills while serving in the Navy. (“On the ship that I went over to the Philippines,” he told The New York Times in 2015, “out of 300 men I was the class comedian.”) After being discharged, he followed his father into the insurance business, but when he had trouble getting his customers to sign on the dotted line, decided to try acting.He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, an experience that he later said gave him a greater sense of himself. But he found it difficult to get acting jobs and turned to stand-up comedy.For a while, he pursued acting and comedy simultaneously. He did his stand-up act at Catskills resorts and in strip clubs, and his movie career got off to an auspicious start with a small part in the 1958 submarine drama “Run Silent, Run Deep,” starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. But the bulk of his film work in the 1960s was in low-budget beach movies: “Bikini Beach,” “Muscle Beach Party” and “Pajama Party,” all in 1964, and “Beach Blanket Bingo” in 1965.By that time, his comedy career had begun gathering momentum. Focusing less on prepared material and more on interaction with his audience, he had found his voice. He was not the first insult comedian — and in fact an earlier master of the comic insult, Jack E. Leonard, was known to complain that Mr. Rickles’s act was too similar to his — but he soon became far and away the most successful.Bookings in the late 1950s at the Slate Brothers nightclub in Hollywood and the lounge of the Sahara Hotel in Las Vegas spread the word. During his Slate Brothers engagement, Carl Reiner recalled in “Mr. Warmth,” the biggest names in show business felt that “if they hadn’t been insulted by Rickles, they weren’t with it.”His appearances insulting celebrities on the Dean Martin roasts and his sparring matches with Carson cemented Mr. Rickles’s reputation, but his unscripted brand of humor proved an uneasy fit for weekly television. A variety show in 1968 and a situation comedy in 1972, both called “The Don Rickles Show,” were short-lived, as was “Daddy Dearest,” a 1993 sitcom in which he and the comedian Richard Lewis played father and son. The closest thing to a hit show he had was “CPO Sharkey,” a Navy comedy, which aired from 1976 to 1978.Critics were often not sure what to make of Mr. Rickles. John J. O’Connor of The Times wrote in 1972 that for some his humor “will always remain tasteless,” while for others “it has its delicious moments of madness.” Tom Shales of The Washington Post, 26 years later, was more enthusiastic, ...

Donald Vincent Pinky, 82, De Soto - Leader Publications

Monday, April 03, 2017

Jeff (Brandi) Swyers, Nathan Swyers, Jeremy (TinaJo Hadley) Weir, Lindsey (Mike) Hensley and Christopher (Teresa) Pinkley; five great-grandchildren: LillyAnn, Tucker, Josie, Carson, Avery and one on the way; and four nieces and nephews: Scotty, Bobby, Joanie and Sandy.Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Sunday, March 26, at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, in St. Louis County. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. on Monday, March 27, at the funeral home. Burial will be at Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis. Arrangements are under the direction of Kutis South County Chapel.

Connie Woodbury - Bismarck Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

Hull in Fargo. She grew up on a farm near Ayr. She attended school in town and graduated from Ayr High School. After several years of college at the University of North Dakota, Connie took a job in Carson, with the soil conservation district. It was here where Connie met Alan Woodbury, and the two were united in marriage on Nov. 27, 1965 in Ayr. They moved to Fargo where they lived in married student housing while Alan attended school, and Connie worked for the Soil Conservation District. They later moved to Dickinson where they made their home ever since. It was here where they raised their family of four children.Connie worked with Alan at Woody’s Feed & Grain for 12 years before taking on her most cherished role of wife, mother and grandmother. She worked part time at Herberger’s for several years, where Connie enjoyed selling shoes.Her greatest joy in life was getting together with her beloved family and following her children and grandchildren in their activities. Holidays were Connie’s favorite time of year, and she took pride in organizing her family’s events. Connie enjoyed baking, especially delicious sweets.Connie enjoyed the Coffee Club she was involved in for many years and treasured the friendships that she made there. Connie loved to travel and was willing to fly anywhere. She enjoyed going out to dinner with Alan. Connie was an avid shopper, especially for Christmas presents and shoes. When her health kept her in, she became an expert at online shopping as well.In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials be given in care of the Connie Woodbury Memorial at CHI St. Alexius Health, Dickinson, foundation or First Congregational Church, Dickinson...