Burden KS Funeral Homes

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Wheeler Funeral Home

504 North Main
Burden, KS 67019
(620) 438-2233
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Burden KS Obituaries and Death Notices

Funeral Set for 11-Year-Old Boy Who Hanged Himself After Alleged Prank - PEOPLE.com

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Suicide Prevention: What to KnowExperts say some common warning signs of suicide include discussing a desire to die or discussing feeling hopeless, like a burden, or trapped or in pain; withdrawing from others; extreme mood swings; and abnormal sleep patterns (sleeping too much or too little).Many suicides have multiple causes and are not triggered by one event, according to experts, who underline that suicidal crises can be overcome with help. Where mental illness is a factor, it can be treated.If you or someone you know is showing warning signs of suicide, consider contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK or seeking help from a professional.

Obituary: U's Robert Kane, renowned expert on aging, never stopped pushing for change - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

Dr. Robert Kane spent his life studying aging and railing against nursing homes, burdensome regulations and a long-term care system that too often fails to support families and their frail loved ones.So it was some consolation that Kane himself didn’t have to endure the indignities he so pointedly criticized through the years. The longtime University of Minnesota professor and researcher died suddenly of a heart attack on Monday, after spending the weekend working at his campus office. He was 77.“He still had so many balls bouncing in the air,” said his wife, Rosalie, a social worker and fellow U scholar who co-authored numerous books and journal articles on the long-term care system with her husband.One of the world’s leading researchers on aging, Kane was thick into leading a project to find ways to fix underlying problems with America’s long-term care system — a system, he long argued, that was ill-suited to treat chronic conditions that last for decades.A bill seeking funding for the initiative, which he called a “rethink tank,” had gotten bipartisan support in...

Overdoses In W.Va. Drain Fund For Burials - Wheeling Intelligencer

Monday, March 13, 2017

Some children are still on their parents’ insurance policies until the age of 25, but for many, the financial burden falls on the families.“Most of our families (of addicts) are worn out leading up to it (the death of a loved one). However, a lot of times we deal with the families asking the ‘what ifs,'” Fithyan said. While it is the nature of their business to deal with emotional grief, Fithyan said he and his staff maintain their composure due to their spiritual beliefs, especially when seeing so many young people losing their lives to addiction.“In my organization, there are a lot of spiritual-minded people. We have a clergy person on staff to work with us,” Fithyan said. He said staff members have to be honest about their feelings if they feel overwhelmed and need to step back from a situation. Seminars are helpful, too, Fithyan said, including one he and his staff recently attended regarding being kind to others, including fellow workers.“It can be especially overwhelming for the younger staff seeing a segment of their society dying from these drugs,” Fithyan added. Gene Fahey, vice president at Altmeyer Funeral Homes which operates facilities in West Virginia, Ohio and Virginia, said drug addiction deaths have been an issue for more than five years locally. “When I was county coroner about five years ago it was an issue then. It has just exploded since then,” Fahey observed.He knows firsthand that drug addiction and its resulting deaths do not discriminate. “It’s the unnatural balance of life when parents are burying their children. This addiction knows no boundaries … not your status in society. I’ve seen good families watch over their kids and still it happens,” Fahey said of the drug culture. “I feel so badly for these families.”The number of young people dying from drug overdoses has been a challenge even for the most seasoned funeral directors. “It affects all of us. Younger people on our staff are seeing people their own age, 20s and 30s, dying. They are coming eyeball to eyeball with mortality,” Fahey commented.Fahey said he struggles with the “whys” of the addiction craze. “Even when they know the risks, they are still chosing to do it. I can’t grasp it,” he offered. “If you don’t believe in God it would be very difficult to be in this profession. It’s difficult enough without a spiritual connection.”Fahey believes education about the dangers of drugs must start at home. He also agrees that getting the word out — whether in an obituary or on social media — can be a way of educating the public that it can happen to anyone. It should not carry the stigma it once did when families remained silent on the issue, he said. Connie Grisell with Grisell Funeral Homes in West Virginia and Ohio, said anytime a young person dies, whether expected or suddenly, it is difficult for all involved. “What I’ve seen is families aren’t prepared to deal with the emotional side when it involves a young person,” Grisell said. “It’s an epidemic everywhere but we haven’t seen a heavy caseload.”In Wheeling, James Kepner said the the Kepner family of funeral directors and their staff have taken extra steps to ensure any family dealing with an overdose death is treated with the kindness and understanding needed during such tragedies.“We are trained when anybody walks in the door we are going to take care of them to the best of our ability. We get them into the showroom, and as gently and politely as possible, we get them through the process.”Kepner acknowledges the drug epidemic is taking its toll on the communities, but said it’s not confined to one age group. “We h...

Funeral home director blames gambling habit for stealing $340000 from elderly clients - FOX43.com

Sunday, February 12, 2017

General Shapiro said at a news conference today at Washington City Hall. “Many of the victims here are frail, living on fixed incomes, and set aside this money so their funeral would not be a burden on their families. Instead, they were taken advantage of, and that’s wrong.”Taucher is charged with 46 felony counts of theft by failure to make required disposition of funds, three misdemeanor counts of the same offense, and one count each of forgery and insurance fraud. Her bail was set at $20,000 unsecured at a preliminary arraignment. Taucher waived a preliminary hearing.Shapiro said OAG investigators believe there may be other potential victims, and are encouraging any person who believes they or a loved one was victimized in this case to contact OAG. Potential victims can call (412) 565-2192 at OAG’s Bureau of Criminal Investigations.Attorney General Shapiro and  Washington County District Attorney Vittone outlined a series of points that seniors or any consumer should consider before planning any funeral. These consumer protection tips are:Ensure the funeral home director provides an itemized cost statement for all services, including advance payments for outside vendors, such as obituary notices in newspapers.When making any advance payment, request the information on the escrow account and the financial institution where it is held to ensure your funds are properly deposited.Anyone with a complaint should contact the PA Funeral Home Directors Association or the Office of Attorney General’s Bureau of Consumer Protection at 800-441-2555.Make sure you review a general price list before signing any contract or agreement. Make sure to review that list against other price lists obtained from other funeral providers.

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Funeral Set for 11-Year-Old Boy Who Hanged Himself After Alleged Prank - PEOPLE.com

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Suicide Prevention: What to KnowExperts say some common warning signs of suicide include discussing a desire to die or discussing feeling hopeless, like a burden, or trapped or in pain; withdrawing from others; extreme mood swings; and abnormal sleep patterns (sleeping too much or too little).Many suicides have multiple causes and are not triggered by one event, according to experts, who underline that suicidal crises can be overcome with help. Where mental illness is a factor, it can be treated.If you or someone you know is showing warning signs of suicide, consider contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK or seeking help from a professional.

Obituary: U's Robert Kane, renowned expert on aging, never stopped pushing for change - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

Dr. Robert Kane spent his life studying aging and railing against nursing homes, burdensome regulations and a long-term care system that too often fails to support families and their frail loved ones.So it was some consolation that Kane himself didn’t have to endure the indignities he so pointedly criticized through the years. The longtime University of Minnesota professor and researcher died suddenly of a heart attack on Monday, after spending the weekend working at his campus office. He was 77.“He still had so many balls bouncing in the air,” said his wife, Rosalie, a social worker and fellow U scholar who co-authored numerous books and journal articles on the long-term care system with her husband.One of the world’s leading researchers on aging, Kane was thick into leading a project to find ways to fix underlying problems with America’s long-term care system — a system, he long argued, that was ill-suited to treat chronic conditions that last for decades.A bill seeking funding for the initiative, which he called a “rethink tank,” had gotten bipartisan support in...

Overdoses In W.Va. Drain Fund For Burials - Wheeling Intelligencer

Monday, March 13, 2017

Some children are still on their parents’ insurance policies until the age of 25, but for many, the financial burden falls on the families.“Most of our families (of addicts) are worn out leading up to it (the death of a loved one). However, a lot of times we deal with the families asking the ‘what ifs,'” Fithyan said. While it is the nature of their business to deal with emotional grief, Fithyan said he and his staff maintain their composure due to their spiritual beliefs, especially when seeing so many young people losing their lives to addiction.“In my organization, there are a lot of spiritual-minded people. We have a clergy person on staff to work with us,” Fithyan said. He said staff members have to be honest about their feelings if they feel overwhelmed and need to step back from a situation. Seminars are helpful, too, Fithyan said, including one he and his staff recently attended regarding being kind to others, including fellow workers.“It can be especially overwhelming for the younger staff seeing a segment of their society dying from these drugs,” Fithyan added. Gene Fahey, vice president at Altmeyer Funeral Homes which operates facilities in West Virginia, Ohio and Virginia, said drug addiction deaths have been an issue for more than five years locally. “When I was county coroner about five years ago it was an issue then. It has just exploded since then,” Fahey observed.He knows firsthand that drug addiction and its resulting deaths do not discriminate. “It’s the unnatural balance of life when parents are burying their children. This addiction knows no boundaries … not your status in society. I’ve seen good families watch over their kids and still it happens,” Fahey said of the drug culture. “I feel so badly for these families.”The number of young people dying from drug overdoses has been a challenge even for the most seasoned funeral directors. “It affects all of us. Younger people on our staff are seeing people their own age, 20s and 30s, dying. They are coming eyeball to eyeball with mortality,” Fahey commented.Fahey said he struggles with the “whys” of the addiction craze. “Even when they know the risks, they are still chosing to do it. I can’t grasp it,” he offered. “If you don’t believe in God it would be very difficult to be in this profession. It’s difficult enough without a spiritual connection.”Fahey believes education about the dangers of drugs must start at home. He also agrees that getting the word out — whether in an obituary or on social media — can be a way of educating the public that it can happen to anyone. It should not carry the stigma it once did when families remained silent on the issue, he said. Connie Grisell with Grisell Funeral Homes in West Virginia and Ohio, said anytime a young person dies, whether expected or suddenly, it is difficult for all involved. “What I’ve seen is families aren’t prepared to deal with the emotional side when it involves a young person,” Grisell said. “It’s an epidemic everywhere but we haven’t seen a heavy caseload.”In Wheeling, James Kepner said the the Kepner family of funeral directors and their staff have taken extra steps to ensure any family dealing with an overdose death is treated with the kindness and understanding needed during such tragedies.“We are trained when anybody walks in the door we are going to take care of them to the best of our ability. We get them into the showroom, and as gently and politely as possible, we get them through the process.”Kepner acknowledges the drug epidemic is taking its toll on the communities, but said it’s not confined to one age group. “We h...

Funeral home director blames gambling habit for stealing $340000 from elderly clients - FOX43.com

Sunday, February 12, 2017

General Shapiro said at a news conference today at Washington City Hall. “Many of the victims here are frail, living on fixed incomes, and set aside this money so their funeral would not be a burden on their families. Instead, they were taken advantage of, and that’s wrong.”Taucher is charged with 46 felony counts of theft by failure to make required disposition of funds, three misdemeanor counts of the same offense, and one count each of forgery and insurance fraud. Her bail was set at $20,000 unsecured at a preliminary arraignment. Taucher waived a preliminary hearing.Shapiro said OAG investigators believe there may be other potential victims, and are encouraging any person who believes they or a loved one was victimized in this case to contact OAG. Potential victims can call (412) 565-2192 at OAG’s Bureau of Criminal Investigations.Attorney General Shapiro and  Washington County District Attorney Vittone outlined a series of points that seniors or any consumer should consider before planning any funeral. These consumer protection tips are:Ensure the funeral home director provides an itemized cost statement for all services, including advance payments for outside vendors, such as obituary notices in newspapers.When making any advance payment, request the information on the escrow account and the financial institution where it is held to ensure your funds are properly deposited.Anyone with a complaint should contact the PA Funeral Home Directors Association or the Office of Attorney General’s Bureau of Consumer Protection at 800-441-2555.Make sure you review a general price list before signing any contract or agreement. Make sure to review that list against other price lists obtained from other funeral providers.