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Cox Funeral Home and Flower Shop

724 Broadway Street
Delhi, LA 71232
(318) 878-3637
Cox Funeral Home and Flower Shop funeral flowers

Cox Funeral Home Lobby

804 Broadway Street
Delhi, LA 71232
(318) 878-2292
Cox Funeral Home Lobby funeral flowers

McFarland Funeral Home Inc

1223 Broadway Street
Delhi, LA 71232
(318) 878-5087
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Delhi LA Obituaries and Death Notices

Deaths for June 8 - Monroe News Star

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Tuesday. Graveside services are 1 p.m. Friday at Saint Rest Baptist Church Cemetery, Dubach. Visitation is 5-7 p.m. Thursday at Golden Funeral Home, Bastrop.Frank B. Jones, 83DELHI Frank B. Jones, a pastor and retired school bus driver, died Sunday. Services are 11 a.m. Monday at Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Delhi. Visitation is Sunday at McFarland Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will be in the church cemetery.Elbert Lucas, 55LAKE PROVIDENCE Elbert Lee Lucas, a laborer, died Monday, May 29. Services are 1 p.m. Saturday at the General Trans High School Auditorium. Visitation is 1-4 p.m. Friday at the Harris Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will be in the Gaither Memorial Cemetery.Chelsea Moore, 87FORT NECESSITY Chelsea Faydette Moore, a school teacher and coach, died Tuesday. Services are 10 a.m. Friday at Boeuf Prairie Methodist Church, Fort Necessity. Visitation is 5-8 p.m. Thursday at Mulhearn Funeral Home, Winnsboro. Burial will be in the church cemetery.Wayne Phillips, 95BASKIN Wayne Phillips died Wednesday. Arrangements are incomplete under the direction of Gill First National Funeral Home.Jessie Rogers, 92Jessie Mae Rogers died Saturday. Services are 11 a.m. Saturday at King's Funeral Home, Ruston. Visitation is 1 p.m. Friday at King's Funeral Home, Ruston. Burial will be at New Hebron Cemetery, Ruston.Patricia Stewart, 54Patricia Stewart of Monroe, homemaker, died Friday. Services are 11 a.m. Saturday at Union Hill Baptist Church, Monroe. Visitation is 1-6 p.m. Friday at Smith Funeral Home, Monroe. Burial will be in the Richwood Memorial Gardens under the direction of Smith Funeral Home.Gene Wilson, 81DOWNSVILLE Gene L. Wi...

India vs England, 4th Test: Two weddings, a funeral and a desert jaunt - The Indian Express

Monday, December 19, 2016

MS Dhoni in the wedding party. The more things change… yada yada yada. Yuvraj is done, next up Ishant Sharma on the 9th in Delhi. Indian wedding scene is certainly here for the cricketers in these demonetised times.A funeral of a political leader though is keeping the board officials, if not the players, on tenterhooks. After a two-day struggle by the doctors and a death watch beamed live on national televisions, J Jayalalithaa was buried alongside her mentor MGR at the Marina beach, a short walk from the stadium in Chennai. The city and the state of Tamil Nadu have been relatively calm but those living outside have let their stereotypical fears grip them. A Ranji match that was set to start on Wednesday in Dindigul has been postponed, with BCCI telling the cricketers to hole themselves inside the hotel for the day. On Tuesday, in Mumbai, the secretary of the board Ajay Shirke talked about how they going to wait and watch the proceedings in Tamil Nadu, where the next Test is scheduled to start on 16, before they make any decision whether to shift the venue.In the here and now, though, India would wait and see whether the R&R has done England any good. Would Bayliss get what he desires — a more positive England? Would Cook stay as a captain when the tour ends? Sometimes, a week can feel like a month.

Frank Donald Amendola, Sr., 95, of Ridgefield, Passed Away - Patch.com

Monday, November 28, 2016

New York Stamp Club for many years.In 1986 he retired and moved to Keeler Drive in Northern Ridgefield. An avid golfer, he enjoyed many rounds at Ridgefield Delhi. Frank was a member of Hope Church in Wilton CT for many years, and is most remembered as a gentle caregiver to his wife Madeline. Whether it was at church, the Post Office, doctor’s offices, or Stop & Shop, many in town will remember him for his wit and charm as he loved to bring a smile and chuckle to all he met. He loved to write poetry and was published in the Ridgefield Press on numerous occasions. Back by popular demand, Patch will bring you the best Cyber Monday 2016 deals. Continually updated throughout the day. Frank is survived by his son Frank Amendola and wife Karen of Ridgefield, CT, his son, Steven Amendola and wife Meredith of Middletown, NJ, and his daughter Elena Gregory and husband Michael of Laurel Park, NC. Frank is also survived by seven granddaughters, two grandsons, and four great grandchildren.The family will receive friends at the Kane Funeral Home on Tuesday, November 15, from 4-8pm. A Celebration of Life service will take place on Wednesday, November 16 at 11am at Kane Funeral Home, 25 Catoonah St, Ridgefield. Burial will follow at nearby Fairlawn Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, the family asks that contributions in his honor be made to jerichopartnership.org. in Danbury.

Veterans home probe still underway - The Franklin Sun

Monday, September 12, 2016

Shoemaker did not have consent or power of attorney to authorize the transaction, according to records retrieved from the Department of Veterans Affairs in Baton Rouge.Matheny, a native of Delhi, died Oct. 2, 2012 at the age of 69. Shortly thereafter, the veterans home received a bill from Kilpatrick’s Funeral Home for $8,600, conducted an inquiry and discovered the $9,000 check was not used for burial expenses.In 2012, Shoemaker wrote a letter to NELA War Veterans Home Administrator Ken Houston that he had driven to the VA Hospital in Shreveport where the ailing Matheny had been transported in September 2012 to get him to sign the $9,000 check for any funeral expenses when needed.“I took his signed check and dropped it off by Kilpatrick’s and told them what (redacted) had requested,” Shoemaker wrote in his 2012 letter. “They said since (redacted) was doing better they could wait until he got back in Monroe to let him set all the details of the funeral.”In his September letter to Houston, Shoemaker said he did not intend to violate any policy when he ordered the original $9,000 be withdrawn from Matheny’s fiduciary account at the veterans home but, if he did, “it was not on purpose or for any personal gain or ill intent.”Progressive Bank records show $9,000 was deposited into Matheny’s personal account on Thursday July 26, 2012. Shortly after that, on Aug. 6, 2012, bank records show a telephone transaction of $1,812.28 was made to an Orchard Bank credit card account belonging to Shoemaker. Investigators identified that transaction as a credit card payment. When asked about the $1,812.28 transaction, Shoemaker told the investigator he had no recollection of that transaction or of that Orchard Bank credit card account.When officials first became aware of all this, Shoemaker was suspended with pay on Aug. 9, 2012 and advised of pending possible disciplinary action “up to and including termination.”Another $4,400 was spent from Matheny’s personal account, too. Progressive Bank records indicated a number of cash ATM withdrawals totaling some $3,200. Also, retail purchases totaling some $1,200 were made with Matheny’s ATM card during the time when Shoemaker possessed the card.When asked about the withdrawals and purchases, Shoemaker told the investigator he was acting on Matheny’s directions. The cash and items purchased were “ultimately passed on to a number of individuals as Mr. Matheny had directed,” according to the arrest warrant.There is no written record of Matheny providing the authorization claimed by Shoemaker.Response to alleged misconductOn Oct. 1, 2012 — the day before Matheny died — the NELA War Veterans Home administrator, Ken Houston, imposed a reduction to Shoemaker's salary from $2,076.80 to $1,453.76 during one two-week pay period, according to documents obtained by this reporter through a public records request submitted to the state Department of Veterans Affairs.Houston stated the disciplinary action was taken against Shoemaker for violations of department policy with respect to “LDVA Accounting Policies and Procedures, and Resident Fiduciary Account Policy.”Shoemaker also was charged with violations of a policy promoting a drug-free workplace through his repeated attempts to secure pain medications from staff pharmacists, according to records obtained by this reporter.In Houston's letter to Shoemaker, he wrote, “...your (Shoemaker's) failure to follow established policies could result in negative patient outcomes and place the facility in legal peril.”In addition to the reduction in Shoemaker's pay, the assistant administrator also was ordered to undergo a “fitness for duty” examination and submit to random drug testing.Shoemaker resigned from hi...

James S. Keat, former Sun editor and champion of freedom of information, dies - Baltimore Sun

Monday, July 25, 2016

Mississippi.Mr. Keat recalled those tense days. "Covering the civil rights movement was a real challenge because they were killing reporters there," he said.He worked a year in The Sun's New Delhi bureau beginning in 1962, then returned to Baltimore as an Evening Sun editorial writer before resuming coverage of the civil rights movement and the Cambridge, Md., riots in 1963.Mr. Keat returned to New Delhi as bureau chief in 1965. He covered the India-Pakistan war fought in Kashmir, the deteriorating relationship between India and China, and the Indian famine.In 1968, he was named editor of Perspective, a commentary and analysis section published in The Sunday Sun."What was my favorite job on the paper? That's hard to say, but I think starting Perspective from scratch. I was given six months to do it and a generous budget," recalled Mr. Keat. "So, I had one foot in the newsroom and one on the road working with different people."Sun managing editor Paul A. Banker named Mr. Keat foreign editor in 1969, and during the early 1970s he joined the Washington bureau covering the White House and State Department. He traveled to China in 1972 with President Richard M. Nixon."Jim had been a foreign correspondent himself and he knew how paranoid correspondents could get about their standing with editors back in Baltimore," said Anthony Barbieri Jr., a former foreign correspondent and managing editor of The Sun. "So whenever I screwed up, I would always send a back-channel cable to Jim asking how bad the damage was, and he would try to make me feel better."From 1975 to 1991, Mr. Keat was an assistant managing editor overseeing foreign, national and metropolitan news and the newspaper's library. All the while, he pressed for reporters to insist that public officials and agencies remain accessible and open."Jim did it all. He was a superb reporter and editor," said Barry L. Rascovar, former editorial-page director of The Sun. "He was a strong advocate of journalistic ethics and openness and journalists' ability to get official documents. He was adamant about the people's right to know what government was doing and have their voices heard."For the last four years of his career before retiring in 1995, he was The Sun's editorial page coordinator. In addition to handling letters to the editor, he'd write occasional editorials and columns.After retiring, Mr. Keat grew a beard and became a South Baltimore activist, leading campaigns against developers who wanted to obscure harbor views with buildings along Key Highway."He became the 'Watchdog of South Baltimore' in his retirement, and that was good for the city," Mr. Sterne said.Mr. Keat never lost his bustling, hurried New York demeanor — nor his accent despite having lived in Baltimore for 60 years."He came from New York and Rhode Island and was more a Baltimorean than a born Baltimorean," said Mr. Sterne.In addition to enjoying informed and lively conversation, Mr. Keat appreciated good food, wine and beer that had to be served at room temperature."I have traveled the world admonishing bartenders that I do not want my beer served in an ice-cold glass," Mr. Keat said recently with a laugh.He...

AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir torn by deadly strife - Lincoln Journal Star

Monday, July 25, 2016

Kashmir dispute in international forums, including in the U.N. India began calling the region its integral part, saying that Kashmir's lawmakers had ratified the accession to New Delhi.As the deadlock persisted, India and Pakistan went to war again in 1965, with little changing on the ground. Several rounds of talks followed, but the impasse continued.In the mid-1980s, dissident political groups in Indian Kashmir united and contested elections for the state assembly. The Muslim United Front quickly emerged as a formidable force against Kashmir's pro-India political elite. However, the front lost the 1987 election, widely believed to have been heavily rigged.A strong public backlash followed. Some young MUF activists crossed over to Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, where the Pakistani military began arming and training Kashmiri nationalists.By 1989, Kashmir was in the throes of a full-blown rebellion.India poured more troops into the already heavily militarized region. In response, thousands of Kashmiris streamed back from the Pakistani-controlled portion with guns and grenades. More than 68,000 people have been killed since then.Though the militancy waned, popular sentiment for "azadi," or freedom, has remained ingrained in the Kashmiri psyche. In the last decade, the region has made a transition from armed rebellion to unarmed uprisings as tens of thousands of civilians frequently take to the streets to protest Indian rule, often leading to clashes between rock-throwing residents and Indian troops. The protests are usually quelled by force, often resulting in deaths.RECENT DEVELOPMENTSIn 2008, a government decision — later revoked — to transfer land to a Hindu shrine in Kashmir set off a summer of protests. The following year, the alleged rape and murder of two young women by government forces set off fresh violence.In 2010, the trigger for protests was a police investigation into allegations that soldiers shot dead three civilians and then staged a fake gunbattle to make it appear that the dead were militants, in order to claim rewards for the killings.In all three years, hundreds of thousands of young men and women took to the streets, hurling rocks and abuse at Indian forces. At least 200 people were killed and hundreds wounded as troops fired into the crowds, inciting further protests.The crackdown appears to be pushing many educated young Kashmiris, who grew up politically radicalized amid decades of brutal conflict, toward armed rebel groups. Young Kashmiri boys began snatching weapons from Indian forces and training themselves deep inside Kashmir's forests.The number of militants has, however, remained minuscule, not crossing 200 in the last several years.ANTI-INDIA GROUPSThe All Parties Hurriyat Conference is a conglomerate of social, religious and political groups formed in 1993. It advocates the U.N.-sponsored right to self-determination for Kashmir or tripartite talks among India, Pakistan and Kashmiri leadership to resolve the dispute.The Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front was one of the first armed rebel groups. It favors an independent, united Kashmir. Currently led by Mohammed Yasin Malik, the group gave up armed rebellion in 1994, soon after Indian authorities released Malik from jail after four years.Hizbul Mujahideen is Kashmir's largest and only surviving indigenous armed rebel group. Formed in 1990, the group demands Kashmir's me...

Wayne Smith, much-loved former minister of city's largest congregation, dies - Lexington Herald Leader

Monday, July 04, 2016

Wayne, there’s got to be a speed limit on those things,’” Speakes said. “He just laughed and kept on going.”In September 2014, he set out to raise $89,480 for a renovation of the church of his youth, Delhi Church of Christ in Cincinnati. The response, which came mostly in the form of checks sent through the mail, was more than $130,000.“I really feel as though I’m going to be leaving here soon,” he said at the time. “This is my last hurrah.”Smith was born in Pennsylvania but grew up in Cincinnati.He graduated from Cincinnati Bible Seminary, but he was always self-deprecating about his academic abilities, saying that writing sermons was the hard...

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Deaths for June 8 - Monroe News Star

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Tuesday. Graveside services are 1 p.m. Friday at Saint Rest Baptist Church Cemetery, Dubach. Visitation is 5-7 p.m. Thursday at Golden Funeral Home, Bastrop.Frank B. Jones, 83DELHI Frank B. Jones, a pastor and retired school bus driver, died Sunday. Services are 11 a.m. Monday at Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Delhi. Visitation is Sunday at McFarland Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will be in the church cemetery.Elbert Lucas, 55LAKE PROVIDENCE Elbert Lee Lucas, a laborer, died Monday, May 29. Services are 1 p.m. Saturday at the General Trans High School Auditorium. Visitation is 1-4 p.m. Friday at the Harris Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will be in the Gaither Memorial Cemetery.Chelsea Moore, 87FORT NECESSITY Chelsea Faydette Moore, a school teacher and coach, died Tuesday. Services are 10 a.m. Friday at Boeuf Prairie Methodist Church, Fort Necessity. Visitation is 5-8 p.m. Thursday at Mulhearn Funeral Home, Winnsboro. Burial will be in the church cemetery.Wayne Phillips, 95BASKIN Wayne Phillips died Wednesday. Arrangements are incomplete under the direction of Gill First National Funeral Home.Jessie Rogers, 92Jessie Mae Rogers died Saturday. Services are 11 a.m. Saturday at King's Funeral Home, Ruston. Visitation is 1 p.m. Friday at King's Funeral Home, Ruston. Burial will be at New Hebron Cemetery, Ruston.Patricia Stewart, 54Patricia Stewart of Monroe, homemaker, died Friday. Services are 11 a.m. Saturday at Union Hill Baptist Church, Monroe. Visitation is 1-6 p.m. Friday at Smith Funeral Home, Monroe. Burial will be in the Richwood Memorial Gardens under the direction of Smith Funeral Home.Gene Wilson, 81DOWNSVILLE Gene L. Wi...

India vs England, 4th Test: Two weddings, a funeral and a desert jaunt - The Indian Express

Monday, December 19, 2016

MS Dhoni in the wedding party. The more things change… yada yada yada. Yuvraj is done, next up Ishant Sharma on the 9th in Delhi. Indian wedding scene is certainly here for the cricketers in these demonetised times.A funeral of a political leader though is keeping the board officials, if not the players, on tenterhooks. After a two-day struggle by the doctors and a death watch beamed live on national televisions, J Jayalalithaa was buried alongside her mentor MGR at the Marina beach, a short walk from the stadium in Chennai. The city and the state of Tamil Nadu have been relatively calm but those living outside have let their stereotypical fears grip them. A Ranji match that was set to start on Wednesday in Dindigul has been postponed, with BCCI telling the cricketers to hole themselves inside the hotel for the day. On Tuesday, in Mumbai, the secretary of the board Ajay Shirke talked about how they going to wait and watch the proceedings in Tamil Nadu, where the next Test is scheduled to start on 16, before they make any decision whether to shift the venue.In the here and now, though, India would wait and see whether the R&R has done England any good. Would Bayliss get what he desires — a more positive England? Would Cook stay as a captain when the tour ends? Sometimes, a week can feel like a month.

Frank Donald Amendola, Sr., 95, of Ridgefield, Passed Away - Patch.com

Monday, November 28, 2016

New York Stamp Club for many years.In 1986 he retired and moved to Keeler Drive in Northern Ridgefield. An avid golfer, he enjoyed many rounds at Ridgefield Delhi. Frank was a member of Hope Church in Wilton CT for many years, and is most remembered as a gentle caregiver to his wife Madeline. Whether it was at church, the Post Office, doctor’s offices, or Stop & Shop, many in town will remember him for his wit and charm as he loved to bring a smile and chuckle to all he met. He loved to write poetry and was published in the Ridgefield Press on numerous occasions. Back by popular demand, Patch will bring you the best Cyber Monday 2016 deals. Continually updated throughout the day. Frank is survived by his son Frank Amendola and wife Karen of Ridgefield, CT, his son, Steven Amendola and wife Meredith of Middletown, NJ, and his daughter Elena Gregory and husband Michael of Laurel Park, NC. Frank is also survived by seven granddaughters, two grandsons, and four great grandchildren.The family will receive friends at the Kane Funeral Home on Tuesday, November 15, from 4-8pm. A Celebration of Life service will take place on Wednesday, November 16 at 11am at Kane Funeral Home, 25 Catoonah St, Ridgefield. Burial will follow at nearby Fairlawn Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, the family asks that contributions in his honor be made to jerichopartnership.org. in Danbury.

Veterans home probe still underway - The Franklin Sun

Monday, September 12, 2016

Shoemaker did not have consent or power of attorney to authorize the transaction, according to records retrieved from the Department of Veterans Affairs in Baton Rouge.Matheny, a native of Delhi, died Oct. 2, 2012 at the age of 69. Shortly thereafter, the veterans home received a bill from Kilpatrick’s Funeral Home for $8,600, conducted an inquiry and discovered the $9,000 check was not used for burial expenses.In 2012, Shoemaker wrote a letter to NELA War Veterans Home Administrator Ken Houston that he had driven to the VA Hospital in Shreveport where the ailing Matheny had been transported in September 2012 to get him to sign the $9,000 check for any funeral expenses when needed.“I took his signed check and dropped it off by Kilpatrick’s and told them what (redacted) had requested,” Shoemaker wrote in his 2012 letter. “They said since (redacted) was doing better they could wait until he got back in Monroe to let him set all the details of the funeral.”In his September letter to Houston, Shoemaker said he did not intend to violate any policy when he ordered the original $9,000 be withdrawn from Matheny’s fiduciary account at the veterans home but, if he did, “it was not on purpose or for any personal gain or ill intent.”Progressive Bank records show $9,000 was deposited into Matheny’s personal account on Thursday July 26, 2012. Shortly after that, on Aug. 6, 2012, bank records show a telephone transaction of $1,812.28 was made to an Orchard Bank credit card account belonging to Shoemaker. Investigators identified that transaction as a credit card payment. When asked about the $1,812.28 transaction, Shoemaker told the investigator he had no recollection of that transaction or of that Orchard Bank credit card account.When officials first became aware of all this, Shoemaker was suspended with pay on Aug. 9, 2012 and advised of pending possible disciplinary action “up to and including termination.”Another $4,400 was spent from Matheny’s personal account, too. Progressive Bank records indicated a number of cash ATM withdrawals totaling some $3,200. Also, retail purchases totaling some $1,200 were made with Matheny’s ATM card during the time when Shoemaker possessed the card.When asked about the withdrawals and purchases, Shoemaker told the investigator he was acting on Matheny’s directions. The cash and items purchased were “ultimately passed on to a number of individuals as Mr. Matheny had directed,” according to the arrest warrant.There is no written record of Matheny providing the authorization claimed by Shoemaker.Response to alleged misconductOn Oct. 1, 2012 — the day before Matheny died — the NELA War Veterans Home administrator, Ken Houston, imposed a reduction to Shoemaker's salary from $2,076.80 to $1,453.76 during one two-week pay period, according to documents obtained by this reporter through a public records request submitted to the state Department of Veterans Affairs.Houston stated the disciplinary action was taken against Shoemaker for violations of department policy with respect to “LDVA Accounting Policies and Procedures, and Resident Fiduciary Account Policy.”Shoemaker also was charged with violations of a policy promoting a drug-free workplace through his repeated attempts to secure pain medications from staff pharmacists, according to records obtained by this reporter.In Houston's letter to Shoemaker, he wrote, “...your (Shoemaker's) failure to follow established policies could result in negative patient outcomes and place the facility in legal peril.”In addition to the reduction in Shoemaker's pay, the assistant administrator also was ordered to undergo a “fitness for duty” examination and submit to random drug testing.Shoemaker resigned from hi...

James S. Keat, former Sun editor and champion of freedom of information, dies - Baltimore Sun

Monday, July 25, 2016

Mississippi.Mr. Keat recalled those tense days. "Covering the civil rights movement was a real challenge because they were killing reporters there," he said.He worked a year in The Sun's New Delhi bureau beginning in 1962, then returned to Baltimore as an Evening Sun editorial writer before resuming coverage of the civil rights movement and the Cambridge, Md., riots in 1963.Mr. Keat returned to New Delhi as bureau chief in 1965. He covered the India-Pakistan war fought in Kashmir, the deteriorating relationship between India and China, and the Indian famine.In 1968, he was named editor of Perspective, a commentary and analysis section published in The Sunday Sun."What was my favorite job on the paper? That's hard to say, but I think starting Perspective from scratch. I was given six months to do it and a generous budget," recalled Mr. Keat. "So, I had one foot in the newsroom and one on the road working with different people."Sun managing editor Paul A. Banker named Mr. Keat foreign editor in 1969, and during the early 1970s he joined the Washington bureau covering the White House and State Department. He traveled to China in 1972 with President Richard M. Nixon."Jim had been a foreign correspondent himself and he knew how paranoid correspondents could get about their standing with editors back in Baltimore," said Anthony Barbieri Jr., a former foreign correspondent and managing editor of The Sun. "So whenever I screwed up, I would always send a back-channel cable to Jim asking how bad the damage was, and he would try to make me feel better."From 1975 to 1991, Mr. Keat was an assistant managing editor overseeing foreign, national and metropolitan news and the newspaper's library. All the while, he pressed for reporters to insist that public officials and agencies remain accessible and open."Jim did it all. He was a superb reporter and editor," said Barry L. Rascovar, former editorial-page director of The Sun. "He was a strong advocate of journalistic ethics and openness and journalists' ability to get official documents. He was adamant about the people's right to know what government was doing and have their voices heard."For the last four years of his career before retiring in 1995, he was The Sun's editorial page coordinator. In addition to handling letters to the editor, he'd write occasional editorials and columns.After retiring, Mr. Keat grew a beard and became a South Baltimore activist, leading campaigns against developers who wanted to obscure harbor views with buildings along Key Highway."He became the 'Watchdog of South Baltimore' in his retirement, and that was good for the city," Mr. Sterne said.Mr. Keat never lost his bustling, hurried New York demeanor — nor his accent despite having lived in Baltimore for 60 years."He came from New York and Rhode Island and was more a Baltimorean than a born Baltimorean," said Mr. Sterne.In addition to enjoying informed and lively conversation, Mr. Keat appreciated good food, wine and beer that had to be served at room temperature."I have traveled the world admonishing bartenders that I do not want my beer served in an ice-cold glass," Mr. Keat said recently with a laugh.He...

AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir torn by deadly strife - Lincoln Journal Star

Monday, July 25, 2016

Kashmir dispute in international forums, including in the U.N. India began calling the region its integral part, saying that Kashmir's lawmakers had ratified the accession to New Delhi.As the deadlock persisted, India and Pakistan went to war again in 1965, with little changing on the ground. Several rounds of talks followed, but the impasse continued.In the mid-1980s, dissident political groups in Indian Kashmir united and contested elections for the state assembly. The Muslim United Front quickly emerged as a formidable force against Kashmir's pro-India political elite. However, the front lost the 1987 election, widely believed to have been heavily rigged.A strong public backlash followed. Some young MUF activists crossed over to Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, where the Pakistani military began arming and training Kashmiri nationalists.By 1989, Kashmir was in the throes of a full-blown rebellion.India poured more troops into the already heavily militarized region. In response, thousands of Kashmiris streamed back from the Pakistani-controlled portion with guns and grenades. More than 68,000 people have been killed since then.Though the militancy waned, popular sentiment for "azadi," or freedom, has remained ingrained in the Kashmiri psyche. In the last decade, the region has made a transition from armed rebellion to unarmed uprisings as tens of thousands of civilians frequently take to the streets to protest Indian rule, often leading to clashes between rock-throwing residents and Indian troops. The protests are usually quelled by force, often resulting in deaths.RECENT DEVELOPMENTSIn 2008, a government decision — later revoked — to transfer land to a Hindu shrine in Kashmir set off a summer of protests. The following year, the alleged rape and murder of two young women by government forces set off fresh violence.In 2010, the trigger for protests was a police investigation into allegations that soldiers shot dead three civilians and then staged a fake gunbattle to make it appear that the dead were militants, in order to claim rewards for the killings.In all three years, hundreds of thousands of young men and women took to the streets, hurling rocks and abuse at Indian forces. At least 200 people were killed and hundreds wounded as troops fired into the crowds, inciting further protests.The crackdown appears to be pushing many educated young Kashmiris, who grew up politically radicalized amid decades of brutal conflict, toward armed rebel groups. Young Kashmiri boys began snatching weapons from Indian forces and training themselves deep inside Kashmir's forests.The number of militants has, however, remained minuscule, not crossing 200 in the last several years.ANTI-INDIA GROUPSThe All Parties Hurriyat Conference is a conglomerate of social, religious and political groups formed in 1993. It advocates the U.N.-sponsored right to self-determination for Kashmir or tripartite talks among India, Pakistan and Kashmiri leadership to resolve the dispute.The Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front was one of the first armed rebel groups. It favors an independent, united Kashmir. Currently led by Mohammed Yasin Malik, the group gave up armed rebellion in 1994, soon after Indian authorities released Malik from jail after four years.Hizbul Mujahideen is Kashmir's largest and only surviving indigenous armed rebel group. Formed in 1990, the group demands Kashmir's me...

Wayne Smith, much-loved former minister of city's largest congregation, dies - Lexington Herald Leader

Monday, July 04, 2016

Wayne, there’s got to be a speed limit on those things,’” Speakes said. “He just laughed and kept on going.”In September 2014, he set out to raise $89,480 for a renovation of the church of his youth, Delhi Church of Christ in Cincinnati. The response, which came mostly in the form of checks sent through the mail, was more than $130,000.“I really feel as though I’m going to be leaving here soon,” he said at the time. “This is my last hurrah.”Smith was born in Pennsylvania but grew up in Cincinnati.He graduated from Cincinnati Bible Seminary, but he was always self-deprecating about his academic abilities, saying that writing sermons was the hard...