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Alexander Funeral Home of Lutcher

2208 Jefferson Highway
Lutcher, LA 70071
(225) 869-5553
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Brazier Watson Funeral Home

360 Exchange Alley
Lutcher, LA 70071
(225) 473-4252
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Lutcher LA Obituaries and Death Notices

Mount Zion Baptist Church in Orange place for support, love - Washington Times

Monday, April 03, 2017

Dunlap, was an elementary teacher at E.H. Wallace, and her grandmother, Izetta Dunlap, opened the first preschool for blacks in 1952.Luper was one of the first black students to attend Orange’s white Lutcher Stark High School, graduating in 1968. She attended and graduated from Lamar University.“The reality is that I’m only four generations from slavery,” Luper said. “That was something that always motivated me. Education is the way to alter your economic status and your opportunity for mobility in this life.”Luper said growing up in the church helped her cope with the some of the white community’s anger at integration.“We were taught coping mechanisms and life lessons in the church,” Luper said. “We were taught, and we teach our children today, that although the First Amendment guarantees freedom of speech, what you say, as a black person, has consequences,”Although some of the church’s responsibility for basic education has passed to public schools, Mount Zion’s spiritual and social influence endured.Henry Lowe attended E.H. Wallace high school from 1952-54. He was baptized at Mount Zion after being drafted in 1961 so that “his soul would be saved in case he died at war”.Lowe said, when he was a kid, “if you weren’t in church, you better be dead.”“That was what you did, you went to church because that’s where everyone was and those were the people - the pastors and deacons - you respected most,” Lowe said.The pastors were spokesmen for the black community, Lowe said.“They were the only ones who felt like they could speak up to whites in power because they were educated,” Lowe said. “Let’s say someone like Mr. (H.J. Lutcher) Stark would come down and ask the pastors what the community needed. If it was feasible, they would get it.”Churches, particular Mount Zion, acted as community centers where blacks could safely air their grievances, Lowe said.“Churches were a place of refuge for blacks, a place where someone could defend you if you were in trouble,” Crawford said. “The pastor was there to speak on your morals. I would say the church acted as an umbrella for the community. It offered shelter of many kinds.”That included a resting place for its congregation’s members.The Hollywood Community Cemetery, two blocks from Mount Zion, is the oldest known black cemetery in the area. According to the Texas Historical Commission, the 2½-acre tract was given to Mount Zion trustee William King in 1875. It’s the resting place of Emma Wallace and Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, the Grammy Award-winning blues guitarist.The name of the cemetery - once the Colored Cemetery - was given by Alfred Sparrow Jr., whose father opened Sparrow Funeral Home in 1920.“He called it that because he said everyone who is buried there is a movie star to their family,” said his son, Wayne Sparrow, who with his wife Francine, still runs the funeral home.Today, Mount Zion - through Sparrow Funeral Home - offers to bury its poorer members for $100. Most times, Crawford waives the fee.“When people are hurting it is our time to reach out,” he said. “Everyone deserves to have a proper resting place, and everyone has loved ones there.”Sparrow, who was in charge of restoring graves after Hurricane Ike, said like the church, the cemetery offers value to the black community.“Wh...

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Mount Zion Baptist Church in Orange place for support, love - Washington Times

Monday, April 03, 2017

Dunlap, was an elementary teacher at E.H. Wallace, and her grandmother, Izetta Dunlap, opened the first preschool for blacks in 1952.Luper was one of the first black students to attend Orange’s white Lutcher Stark High School, graduating in 1968. She attended and graduated from Lamar University.“The reality is that I’m only four generations from slavery,” Luper said. “That was something that always motivated me. Education is the way to alter your economic status and your opportunity for mobility in this life.”Luper said growing up in the church helped her cope with the some of the white community’s anger at integration.“We were taught coping mechanisms and life lessons in the church,” Luper said. “We were taught, and we teach our children today, that although the First Amendment guarantees freedom of speech, what you say, as a black person, has consequences,”Although some of the church’s responsibility for basic education has passed to public schools, Mount Zion’s spiritual and social influence endured.Henry Lowe attended E.H. Wallace high school from 1952-54. He was baptized at Mount Zion after being drafted in 1961 so that “his soul would be saved in case he died at war”.Lowe said, when he was a kid, “if you weren’t in church, you better be dead.”“That was what you did, you went to church because that’s where everyone was and those were the people - the pastors and deacons - you respected most,” Lowe said.The pastors were spokesmen for the black community, Lowe said.“They were the only ones who felt like they could speak up to whites in power because they were educated,” Lowe said. “Let’s say someone like Mr. (H.J. Lutcher) Stark would come down and ask the pastors what the community needed. If it was feasible, they would get it.”Churches, particular Mount Zion, acted as community centers where blacks could safely air their grievances, Lowe said.“Churches were a place of refuge for blacks, a place where someone could defend you if you were in trouble,” Crawford said. “The pastor was there to speak on your morals. I would say the church acted as an umbrella for the community. It offered shelter of many kinds.”That included a resting place for its congregation’s members.The Hollywood Community Cemetery, two blocks from Mount Zion, is the oldest known black cemetery in the area. According to the Texas Historical Commission, the 2½-acre tract was given to Mount Zion trustee William King in 1875. It’s the resting place of Emma Wallace and Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, the Grammy Award-winning blues guitarist.The name of the cemetery - once the Colored Cemetery - was given by Alfred Sparrow Jr., whose father opened Sparrow Funeral Home in 1920.“He called it that because he said everyone who is buried there is a movie star to their family,” said his son, Wayne Sparrow, who with his wife Francine, still runs the funeral home.Today, Mount Zion - through Sparrow Funeral Home - offers to bury its poorer members for $100. Most times, Crawford waives the fee.“When people are hurting it is our time to reach out,” he said. “Everyone deserves to have a proper resting place, and everyone has loved ones there.”Sparrow, who was in charge of restoring graves after Hurricane Ike, said like the church, the cemetery offers value to the black community.“Wh...