Charlestown MA Funeral Homes

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Carr Frank H Funeral Service

220 Bunker Hill Street
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617) 242-1509
Carr Frank H Funeral Service funeral flowers

Carr Philip X Funeral Director

220 Bunker Hill Street
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617) 242-1509
Carr Philip X Funeral Director funeral flowers

John H. Sawyer Funeral Home

329 Bunker Hill Street
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617) 242-2455
John H. Sawyer Funeral Home funeral flowers

Sawyer's Funeral Home

329 Bunker Hill Street
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617) 242-2455
Sawyer's Funeral Home funeral flowers

Charlestown MA Obituaries and Death Notices

Robert E. Hayden Jr., 74, police chief with commanding presence - The Boston Globe

Monday, March 27, 2017

Carpenter said.As a deputy superintendent in Boston, Mr. Hayden oversaw police in Government Center, East Boston, Charlestown, Beacon Hill, and parts of the Back Bay. During President Clinton’s first administration, he accompanied the president on a run along the Charles River.After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Mr. Hayden voluntarily joined recovery efforts at the World Trade Center.In 2001, he was recruited for the reality TV series “Lost.” He was paired with a wise-cracking young man from Tennessee, whom Mr. Hayden eventually threatened to throw off a mountain.The pair were first blindfolded on a plane in Cleveland and delivered to an unknown country with little money and no maps on a quest to reach the United States. They led for most of the 21-day adventure, but made a wrong turn and eventually came in third.“He loved it. He said it was extremely difficult,” said his son Robert, who is an attorney. “They slept on park benches. He said he could relate now to homeless people – having no money and being hungry.”Globe Staff/FileMr. Hayden (left) jogged with then-Boston Mayor Ray Flynn, then-US Senator Al Gore, and Secret Service agents in the Public Garden in 1992. Mr. Hayden grew up in the Ashmont Hill section of Dorchester and joined the Boston Police force in 1966, following in the footsteps of his father, who was a detective for more than 30 years.He was married for 50 years to his childhood sweetheart, the former Katy Desmond. He fell in love with her the first time he saw her figure skating in a local park and ran home to borrow some skates to join her on the ice. She was 14 and told him to get lost and see a good psychiatrist, he told the Globe in an interview last year.“I might say it broke my heart, but it didn’t stop me from being there every day. I was way out of my league with Katy, way over my head,” Mr. Hayden said.Her death last year from cancer left him devastated, according to his family. In his grief, he had her name tattooed on his bicep with a line from the song they liked to sing to each other: “You are my sunshine, my only sunshine.” It was his first tattoo.The couple made headlines in 2007 when Mr. Hayden subdued an unruly passenger aboard a flight to Boston. Katy read a book during the entire ordeal. “I knew how that situation would end. I didn’t know how the book would end,” Mrs. Hayden deadpanned in a Globe interview.“He was a good father to his kids,” said his daughter Kathy Smith. She remembered how her father would come home from working nights and leave out snacks, notes, and funny drawings for his children to see in the morning.When she was in first grade, Mr. Hayden would sometimes visit the school and hand out ice cream cups to her classmates before he went to work. He was dressed in full riot gear and worked on a special tactical unit sent to quell rock-throwing protesters during court-ordered busing to desegregate the schools in the 1970s.“He used to feel so bad for the kids on the buses,” said Kathy, who is an assistant special education instructor.Mr. Hayden was “a goofball” with his children, and later with his grandchildren, she said, and was unfailing in his encouragement and support. “He made you think you could do anything,” she said...

Obituary: Harry Games, 88, of Somerville - Patch.com

Monday, February 27, 2017

Beloved father of Stephen and his wife Shelli of N. Reading, Brian of Somerville, Paul and his wife Karen of Newburyport, Stephanie Games of Charlestown, and Jason Arcaro of Somerville. Brother of the late Anna Brown. Also survived by 9 Grandchildren and 7 Great Grandchildren. Funeral procession from the George L. Doherty Funeral Home, 855 Broadway (Powder House Sq.) Somerville, Tuesday morning at 8:30am followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Raphael Church, Medford at 9:30am. Relatives and friends invited. Calling hours Monday 4-8pm. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. Former owner of the Commonwealth Tire Company of Somerville, Veteran WWII, US Marine Corp. Donations may be made in Harry’s memory to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, 1250 Fourth Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401.Obituary and photo courtesy of Doherty Funeral Home Get free real-time news alerts from the Somerville Patch.

Services planned for longtime Ridgefield resident Dominick Michael ... - HamletHub

Monday, October 24, 2016

Dominick’s life revolved around his passion for his large extended family. He and his wife, Olga, also enjoyed many memorable years in their vacation home in Charlestown Beach, RI and traveling with friends in Italy.He is survived by his devoted wife, Olga, of 66 years as well as his six loving children and their spouses: Dominique Mavelli and her husband, Jeffrey of Newtown, CT, Michele Vontobel and her husband, Dane of Newtown, CT, Renee Protomastro and her husband, Gary Everett of Shelton, CT, Leslie Protomastro and her husband, Dr. Daniel Saltzman of New York City, Dana Hall and her husband, Glenn Hall of Newtown, CT and Dr. Paul Protomastro and his wife, Nicole of South Salem, NY as well as 12 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Dominick will be fondly remembered as a loving husband, father, grandfather, uncle, and friend as well as a spectacularly kind human being.A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Tuesday, October 25 at 10:15 AM, St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, 55 Catoonah Street, Ridgefield, CT with interment to follow in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Ridgefield. Relatives and friends may call at Kane Funeral Home, 25 Catoonah Street, Ridgefield, CT on Monday, October 24 from 5 to 9 PM. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you consider a donation to the Fr. Camillus Protomastro Scholarship Fund, which supports education for urban disadvantaged youth; Fr. Camillus Protomastro Scholarship Fund – St. Joseph’s School of Yorkville: 420 East 87th St.; New York, NY 10128 - Attention Theresa Bernero.

Suzanne Corkin, Who Helped Pinpoint Nature of Memory, Dies at 79 - New York Times

Monday, June 06, 2016

She closely guarded access to Mr. Molaison, especially after his parents died and he moved in with a family friend and later to a nursing home.Dr. Corkin lived in Charlestown, Mass. In addition to her daughter, she is survived by two sons, Damon and J. Zachary, and seven grandchildren. Her marriage to Charles Corkin ended in divorce.Dr. Corkin published more than 100 research papers, touching on topics as varied as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and psychosurgery. She also wrote or co-wrote 10 books.But it was her relationship with H.M. that was defining. His profound deficits made their relationship anything but normal — every time she walked in the room, she had to reintroduce herself — but that repetition bred a curious bond over time.“He thought he knew me from high school,” Dr. Corkin said in an interview with The New York Times in 2008.After Mr. Molaison died, Dr. Corkin arranged to have his brain removed, preserved, exhaustively imaged and finally sent for dissection and electronic mapping. It became a kind of monument as well as a historical artifact and resource for further study.In her book “Permanent Present Tense: The Unforgettable Life of the Amnesic Patient, H.M.” (2013), Dr. Corkin wrote about her transition from seeing Mr. Molaison as a “subject” to seeing him as a human being. “My interest in Henry,” she wrote, “had always been primarily intellectual; how else would I explain why I had stood on a chair in the basement of Mass General, ecstatic to see his brain expertly removed from his skull?”Still, she added: “I felt compassion for Henry and respected his outlook on life. He was more than a research participant. He was a collaborator — a prized partner in our larger quest to understand memory.”...

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Robert E. Hayden Jr., 74, police chief with commanding presence - The Boston Globe

Monday, March 27, 2017

Carpenter said.As a deputy superintendent in Boston, Mr. Hayden oversaw police in Government Center, East Boston, Charlestown, Beacon Hill, and parts of the Back Bay. During President Clinton’s first administration, he accompanied the president on a run along the Charles River.After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Mr. Hayden voluntarily joined recovery efforts at the World Trade Center.In 2001, he was recruited for the reality TV series “Lost.” He was paired with a wise-cracking young man from Tennessee, whom Mr. Hayden eventually threatened to throw off a mountain.The pair were first blindfolded on a plane in Cleveland and delivered to an unknown country with little money and no maps on a quest to reach the United States. They led for most of the 21-day adventure, but made a wrong turn and eventually came in third.“He loved it. He said it was extremely difficult,” said his son Robert, who is an attorney. “They slept on park benches. He said he could relate now to homeless people – having no money and being hungry.”Globe Staff/FileMr. Hayden (left) jogged with then-Boston Mayor Ray Flynn, then-US Senator Al Gore, and Secret Service agents in the Public Garden in 1992. Mr. Hayden grew up in the Ashmont Hill section of Dorchester and joined the Boston Police force in 1966, following in the footsteps of his father, who was a detective for more than 30 years.He was married for 50 years to his childhood sweetheart, the former Katy Desmond. He fell in love with her the first time he saw her figure skating in a local park and ran home to borrow some skates to join her on the ice. She was 14 and told him to get lost and see a good psychiatrist, he told the Globe in an interview last year.“I might say it broke my heart, but it didn’t stop me from being there every day. I was way out of my league with Katy, way over my head,” Mr. Hayden said.Her death last year from cancer left him devastated, according to his family. In his grief, he had her name tattooed on his bicep with a line from the song they liked to sing to each other: “You are my sunshine, my only sunshine.” It was his first tattoo.The couple made headlines in 2007 when Mr. Hayden subdued an unruly passenger aboard a flight to Boston. Katy read a book during the entire ordeal. “I knew how that situation would end. I didn’t know how the book would end,” Mrs. Hayden deadpanned in a Globe interview.“He was a good father to his kids,” said his daughter Kathy Smith. She remembered how her father would come home from working nights and leave out snacks, notes, and funny drawings for his children to see in the morning.When she was in first grade, Mr. Hayden would sometimes visit the school and hand out ice cream cups to her classmates before he went to work. He was dressed in full riot gear and worked on a special tactical unit sent to quell rock-throwing protesters during court-ordered busing to desegregate the schools in the 1970s.“He used to feel so bad for the kids on the buses,” said Kathy, who is an assistant special education instructor.Mr. Hayden was “a goofball” with his children, and later with his grandchildren, she said, and was unfailing in his encouragement and support. “He made you think you could do anything,” she said...

Obituary: Harry Games, 88, of Somerville - Patch.com

Monday, February 27, 2017

Beloved father of Stephen and his wife Shelli of N. Reading, Brian of Somerville, Paul and his wife Karen of Newburyport, Stephanie Games of Charlestown, and Jason Arcaro of Somerville. Brother of the late Anna Brown. Also survived by 9 Grandchildren and 7 Great Grandchildren. Funeral procession from the George L. Doherty Funeral Home, 855 Broadway (Powder House Sq.) Somerville, Tuesday morning at 8:30am followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Raphael Church, Medford at 9:30am. Relatives and friends invited. Calling hours Monday 4-8pm. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. Former owner of the Commonwealth Tire Company of Somerville, Veteran WWII, US Marine Corp. Donations may be made in Harry’s memory to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, 1250 Fourth Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401.Obituary and photo courtesy of Doherty Funeral Home Get free real-time news alerts from the Somerville Patch.

Services planned for longtime Ridgefield resident Dominick Michael ... - HamletHub

Monday, October 24, 2016

Dominick’s life revolved around his passion for his large extended family. He and his wife, Olga, also enjoyed many memorable years in their vacation home in Charlestown Beach, RI and traveling with friends in Italy.He is survived by his devoted wife, Olga, of 66 years as well as his six loving children and their spouses: Dominique Mavelli and her husband, Jeffrey of Newtown, CT, Michele Vontobel and her husband, Dane of Newtown, CT, Renee Protomastro and her husband, Gary Everett of Shelton, CT, Leslie Protomastro and her husband, Dr. Daniel Saltzman of New York City, Dana Hall and her husband, Glenn Hall of Newtown, CT and Dr. Paul Protomastro and his wife, Nicole of South Salem, NY as well as 12 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Dominick will be fondly remembered as a loving husband, father, grandfather, uncle, and friend as well as a spectacularly kind human being.A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Tuesday, October 25 at 10:15 AM, St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, 55 Catoonah Street, Ridgefield, CT with interment to follow in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Ridgefield. Relatives and friends may call at Kane Funeral Home, 25 Catoonah Street, Ridgefield, CT on Monday, October 24 from 5 to 9 PM. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you consider a donation to the Fr. Camillus Protomastro Scholarship Fund, which supports education for urban disadvantaged youth; Fr. Camillus Protomastro Scholarship Fund – St. Joseph’s School of Yorkville: 420 East 87th St.; New York, NY 10128 - Attention Theresa Bernero.

Suzanne Corkin, Who Helped Pinpoint Nature of Memory, Dies at 79 - New York Times

Monday, June 06, 2016

She closely guarded access to Mr. Molaison, especially after his parents died and he moved in with a family friend and later to a nursing home.Dr. Corkin lived in Charlestown, Mass. In addition to her daughter, she is survived by two sons, Damon and J. Zachary, and seven grandchildren. Her marriage to Charles Corkin ended in divorce.Dr. Corkin published more than 100 research papers, touching on topics as varied as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and psychosurgery. She also wrote or co-wrote 10 books.But it was her relationship with H.M. that was defining. His profound deficits made their relationship anything but normal — every time she walked in the room, she had to reintroduce herself — but that repetition bred a curious bond over time.“He thought he knew me from high school,” Dr. Corkin said in an interview with The New York Times in 2008.After Mr. Molaison died, Dr. Corkin arranged to have his brain removed, preserved, exhaustively imaged and finally sent for dissection and electronic mapping. It became a kind of monument as well as a historical artifact and resource for further study.In her book “Permanent Present Tense: The Unforgettable Life of the Amnesic Patient, H.M.” (2013), Dr. Corkin wrote about her transition from seeing Mr. Molaison as a “subject” to seeing him as a human being. “My interest in Henry,” she wrote, “had always been primarily intellectual; how else would I explain why I had stood on a chair in the basement of Mass General, ecstatic to see his brain expertly removed from his skull?”Still, she added: “I felt compassion for Henry and respected his outlook on life. He was more than a research participant. He was a collaborator — a prized partner in our larger quest to understand memory.”...