Roxbury MA Funeral Homes

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Davis Funeral Home

89 Walnut Avenue
Roxbury, MA 02119
(617) 427-0828
Davis Funeral Home funeral flowers

E P Caggiano and Son Funeral Home

147 Winthrop Street
Roxbury, MA 02119
(617) 846-8700
E P Caggiano and Son Funeral Home funeral flowers

Hasiotis Arthur C

1654 Washington Street
Roxbury, MA 02118
(617) 247-7445
Hasiotis Arthur C funeral flowers

JB Johnson Funeral Home

196 Warren Street
Roxbury, MA 02119
(617) 445-8150
JB Johnson Funeral Home funeral flowers

Roxbury MA Obituaries and Death Notices

Nat Hentoff, Journalist and Social Commentator, Dies at 91 - New York Times

Monday, January 09, 2017

Nathan Irving Hentoff was born in Boston on June 10, 1925, the son of Simon and Lena Katzenberg Hentoff. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Russia, and he grew up in the tough Roxbury section in a vortex of political debate among Socialists, anarchists, Communists, Trotskyites and other revolutionaries. He learned early how to rebel.In 1937, on Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement and fasting, the 12-year-old Nat sat on his porch on a street leading to a synagogue and slowly ate a salami sandwich. It made him sick, and the action outraged his father. He had not done it to scandalize passing Jews who glared at him, he said in a memoir, “Boston Boy” (1986). “I wanted to know how it felt to be an outcast,” he wrote. “Except for my father’s reaction and for getting sick, it turned out to be quite enjoyable.”He attended Boston Latin, the oldest public school in America, and read voraciously. He discovered Artie Shaw and fell passionately for Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Fats Waller and other jazz legends. As more modern styles of jazz emerged, Mr. Hentoff also embraced musicians like Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus and, later, Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor.At Northeastern University, he became editor of a student newspaper and turned it into a muckraker. When it dug up a story about trustees backing anti-Semitic publications, the university shut it down. Mr. Hentoff and members of his staff resigned, but he graduated in 1946 with high honors and a lasting devotion to the First Amendment.After several years with a Boston radio station, he moved to New York in 1953 and covered jazz for Down Beat until 1957.He was one of the most prolific jazz writers of the 1950s and ’60s, providing liner notes for countless albums as well as writing or editing several books on jazz, including “Hear Me Talkin’ to Ya: The Story of Jazz as Told by the Men Who Made It” (1955), which he edited with Nat Shapiro. It was a seminal work of oral history.In 1958, he was a founding editor of The Jazz Review, an influential publication that lasted until 1961. In 1960, he began a notable, if brief, career as a record producer, supervising sessions by Mingus, Max Roach and others for the Candid label.Around the same time, he began a freelance career that took him into the pages of Esquire, Harper’s, Commonweal, The Reporter, Playboy and The New York Herald Tribune.In 1958, he began writing for The Village Voice, the counterculture weekly. It became a 50-year gig, despite changes of ownership and editorial direction. Veering from jazz, he wrote weekly columns on civil liberties, politics, education, capital punishment and other topics, all widely syndicated to newspapers.In January 2009, he was laid off by The Voice, but he said he would continue to bang away on the electric typewriter in his cluttered Greenwich Village apartment, producing articles for United Features and Jewish World Review and reflections on jazz and other music for The Wall Street Journal.Citing the journalists George Seldes and I. F. Stone as his muses, he promised in a farewell Voice column to keep “putting on my skunk suit at other garden parties.”He wrote for The New Yorker from 1960 to 1986 and for The Washington Post from 1984 to 2000. He also wrote for The Washington Times and other publications. For years, he lectured at schools and colleges, and he was on the faculties of New York University and the New School.Mr. Hentoff’s first book, “The Jazz Life” (1961), examined social and psychological aspects of jazz. Later came “Peace Agitator: The Story of A. J. Muste” (1963), a biography of the pacifist, and “The New Equality” (1964), on the role of white guilt in racial reforms.“Jazz Country” (1965) was the first of a series of novels for young adults. It explored the struggles of a young white musician breaking into the black jazz scene. Others included “This School Is Driving Me Crazy” (1976), “Does This School Have Capital Punishment?” (1981) and “The Day They Came to Arrest the Book” (1982). They addressed subjects like th...

New council will advise state on veterans' services - Wicked Local Acton

Monday, November 14, 2016

Marine Corps and now teaches at East Boston High School; Richard Gormley, who earned the cross of gallantry as a Marine in Da Nang during the Vietnam War and now owns a West Roxbury funeral home; Julie Hall, an at large councilor for Attleboro and retired Air Force colonel; Joseph Mitchell, who flew jets for the Air Force in the Persian Gulf and over Bosnia; Robert Mirabito, a former third baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals who later joined the Disabled American Veterans Association; Victor Nunez-Ortiz, who joined the Marines in 2001 and is now chief operating officer of Veterans' Advocacy Services; and Margaret White, a former Swampscott and Lynnfield police officer, who served as Camp Commander at Guantanamo Bay and then returned to the Massachusetts National Guard as assistant chief of staff, according to the governor's office.

Anna M. (Ternullo) Regolino, 84, of Tewksbury - Patch.com

Monday, September 19, 2016

Born in Boston on May 17, 1932, she was one of twelve children of the late Filipe Ternullo and the late Maria (Tringale) Ternullo. Ann was raised in the West End area of Boston and graduated from Roxbury Memorial High School for Girls. In 1965, she and her husband moved to Tewksbury, where they raised their three children. Prior to her retirement, she was employed for 20 years by the AVCO Systems Company and the Textron Company in Wilmington, where she worked as a financial analyst. Ann enjoyed going to the beach, and spending time basking in the sun. In addition to her husband, she is survived by three children, Connie Reppucci and her husband Jack of Burlington, Mary Ann Deshler and her husband Richard, and John Regolino and his wife Angela all of Tewksbury; four grandchildren, David Reppucci and his wife Jaclyn of Londonderry, NH, Jonathan and Nicole Deshler, and John Regolino, III all of Tewksbury; two great grandchildren; Samuel and Madeline Reppucci both of Londonderry, NH; also many nieces, nephews, and extended family members. Ann was pre-deceased by five brothers and six sisters. Calling hours are Monday, Sept. 5, from 3-8 p.m. at the Farmer & Dee Funeral Home, 16 Lee St., Tewksbury. Her funeral will be held Tuesday, Sept. 6, at 9 a.m. from the funeral home, followed by her Funeral Mass at 10 a.m. at St. William’s Church, 1351 Main St., Rte. 38, Tewksbury. Interment at Tewksbury Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, www.dana-farber.org, 10 Brookli...

Mary Pedersen - TAPinto.net

Monday, July 04, 2016

ROXBURY, NJ - Mary Pedersen of Landing passed away on Saturday, June 25, 2016 at St. Clare's Hospital in Denville, NJ surrounded by her loving family.She was 87 years old. Mary was born on September 12, 1928 in Netcong, NJ to the late Elizabeth (DeFelice) and the late Augustine Dulio.She worked at Lenape Valley High School in the cafeteria as a food service worker for many years. Mary was a longtime resident of Landing. She enjoyed shopping, bingo, walking, the beach but most importantly she loved spending time with her family.Sign Up for E-NewsMary is survived by her devoted daughter, Tracy Smolen & her husband, Scott and her cherished grandchildren, Julia and Drew. Additional survivors include her sisters, Margaret Bixby, Theresa Donnarumma, Cathy MacDonald and Carol Vanderhoof and her brothers, Joe, Gus, John and Ken Dulio. She was pre-deceased by her beloved husband, Dave in 2006, her sister, Rose Reilly and her brother, Dan Dulio.Mary's Life Celebration arrangements will inclu...

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Nat Hentoff, Journalist and Social Commentator, Dies at 91 - New York Times

Monday, January 09, 2017

Nathan Irving Hentoff was born in Boston on June 10, 1925, the son of Simon and Lena Katzenberg Hentoff. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Russia, and he grew up in the tough Roxbury section in a vortex of political debate among Socialists, anarchists, Communists, Trotskyites and other revolutionaries. He learned early how to rebel.In 1937, on Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement and fasting, the 12-year-old Nat sat on his porch on a street leading to a synagogue and slowly ate a salami sandwich. It made him sick, and the action outraged his father. He had not done it to scandalize passing Jews who glared at him, he said in a memoir, “Boston Boy” (1986). “I wanted to know how it felt to be an outcast,” he wrote. “Except for my father’s reaction and for getting sick, it turned out to be quite enjoyable.”He attended Boston Latin, the oldest public school in America, and read voraciously. He discovered Artie Shaw and fell passionately for Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Fats Waller and other jazz legends. As more modern styles of jazz emerged, Mr. Hentoff also embraced musicians like Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus and, later, Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor.At Northeastern University, he became editor of a student newspaper and turned it into a muckraker. When it dug up a story about trustees backing anti-Semitic publications, the university shut it down. Mr. Hentoff and members of his staff resigned, but he graduated in 1946 with high honors and a lasting devotion to the First Amendment.After several years with a Boston radio station, he moved to New York in 1953 and covered jazz for Down Beat until 1957.He was one of the most prolific jazz writers of the 1950s and ’60s, providing liner notes for countless albums as well as writing or editing several books on jazz, including “Hear Me Talkin’ to Ya: The Story of Jazz as Told by the Men Who Made It” (1955), which he edited with Nat Shapiro. It was a seminal work of oral history.In 1958, he was a founding editor of The Jazz Review, an influential publication that lasted until 1961. In 1960, he began a notable, if brief, career as a record producer, supervising sessions by Mingus, Max Roach and others for the Candid label.Around the same time, he began a freelance career that took him into the pages of Esquire, Harper’s, Commonweal, The Reporter, Playboy and The New York Herald Tribune.In 1958, he began writing for The Village Voice, the counterculture weekly. It became a 50-year gig, despite changes of ownership and editorial direction. Veering from jazz, he wrote weekly columns on civil liberties, politics, education, capital punishment and other topics, all widely syndicated to newspapers.In January 2009, he was laid off by The Voice, but he said he would continue to bang away on the electric typewriter in his cluttered Greenwich Village apartment, producing articles for United Features and Jewish World Review and reflections on jazz and other music for The Wall Street Journal.Citing the journalists George Seldes and I. F. Stone as his muses, he promised in a farewell Voice column to keep “putting on my skunk suit at other garden parties.”He wrote for The New Yorker from 1960 to 1986 and for The Washington Post from 1984 to 2000. He also wrote for The Washington Times and other publications. For years, he lectured at schools and colleges, and he was on the faculties of New York University and the New School.Mr. Hentoff’s first book, “The Jazz Life” (1961), examined social and psychological aspects of jazz. Later came “Peace Agitator: The Story of A. J. Muste” (1963), a biography of the pacifist, and “The New Equality” (1964), on the role of white guilt in racial reforms.“Jazz Country” (1965) was the first of a series of novels for young adults. It explored the struggles of a young white musician breaking into the black jazz scene. Others included “This School Is Driving Me Crazy” (1976), “Does This School Have Capital Punishment?” (1981) and “The Day They Came to Arrest the Book” (1982). They addressed subjects like th...

New council will advise state on veterans' services - Wicked Local Acton

Monday, November 14, 2016

Marine Corps and now teaches at East Boston High School; Richard Gormley, who earned the cross of gallantry as a Marine in Da Nang during the Vietnam War and now owns a West Roxbury funeral home; Julie Hall, an at large councilor for Attleboro and retired Air Force colonel; Joseph Mitchell, who flew jets for the Air Force in the Persian Gulf and over Bosnia; Robert Mirabito, a former third baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals who later joined the Disabled American Veterans Association; Victor Nunez-Ortiz, who joined the Marines in 2001 and is now chief operating officer of Veterans' Advocacy Services; and Margaret White, a former Swampscott and Lynnfield police officer, who served as Camp Commander at Guantanamo Bay and then returned to the Massachusetts National Guard as assistant chief of staff, according to the governor's office.

Anna M. (Ternullo) Regolino, 84, of Tewksbury - Patch.com

Monday, September 19, 2016

Born in Boston on May 17, 1932, she was one of twelve children of the late Filipe Ternullo and the late Maria (Tringale) Ternullo. Ann was raised in the West End area of Boston and graduated from Roxbury Memorial High School for Girls. In 1965, she and her husband moved to Tewksbury, where they raised their three children. Prior to her retirement, she was employed for 20 years by the AVCO Systems Company and the Textron Company in Wilmington, where she worked as a financial analyst. Ann enjoyed going to the beach, and spending time basking in the sun. In addition to her husband, she is survived by three children, Connie Reppucci and her husband Jack of Burlington, Mary Ann Deshler and her husband Richard, and John Regolino and his wife Angela all of Tewksbury; four grandchildren, David Reppucci and his wife Jaclyn of Londonderry, NH, Jonathan and Nicole Deshler, and John Regolino, III all of Tewksbury; two great grandchildren; Samuel and Madeline Reppucci both of Londonderry, NH; also many nieces, nephews, and extended family members. Ann was pre-deceased by five brothers and six sisters. Calling hours are Monday, Sept. 5, from 3-8 p.m. at the Farmer & Dee Funeral Home, 16 Lee St., Tewksbury. Her funeral will be held Tuesday, Sept. 6, at 9 a.m. from the funeral home, followed by her Funeral Mass at 10 a.m. at St. William’s Church, 1351 Main St., Rte. 38, Tewksbury. Interment at Tewksbury Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, www.dana-farber.org, 10 Brookli...

Mary Pedersen - TAPinto.net

Monday, July 04, 2016

ROXBURY, NJ - Mary Pedersen of Landing passed away on Saturday, June 25, 2016 at St. Clare's Hospital in Denville, NJ surrounded by her loving family.She was 87 years old. Mary was born on September 12, 1928 in Netcong, NJ to the late Elizabeth (DeFelice) and the late Augustine Dulio.She worked at Lenape Valley High School in the cafeteria as a food service worker for many years. Mary was a longtime resident of Landing. She enjoyed shopping, bingo, walking, the beach but most importantly she loved spending time with her family.Sign Up for E-NewsMary is survived by her devoted daughter, Tracy Smolen & her husband, Scott and her cherished grandchildren, Julia and Drew. Additional survivors include her sisters, Margaret Bixby, Theresa Donnarumma, Cathy MacDonald and Carol Vanderhoof and her brothers, Joe, Gus, John and Ken Dulio. She was pre-deceased by her beloved husband, Dave in 2006, her sister, Rose Reilly and her brother, Dan Dulio.Mary's Life Celebration arrangements will inclu...