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Stennes Funeral Home

204 West Broadway
Climax, MN 56523
(218) 857-2145
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Climax MN Obituaries and Death Notices

Are the Chinese insatiable romantics? - Aljazeera.com

Monday, November 14, 2016

Colbert's mollycoddled heiress falling for Clark Gable's cocky newspaper hack, it featured the ostensibly mismatched lovers we've seen so many times since, as well as the narrowly-averted-wedding climax familiar from the likes of Four Weddings.The new style of comedy fed off social changes in an urbanising America, with the majority living in cities for the first time after the 1920s.READ MORE: Toothless tigers - Can a film please China and the West?The thrilling sense of sexual availability and possibilities on sidewalks, in bureaus and bars brought different walks of life together, putting the entire class system in a cocktail shaker. These metropolitan rhythms propelled the urbane sparring of screwball comedies such as His Girl Friday and Philadelphia Story, a tone still lingering in romcoms at the end of the century.Fascinatingly, China passed the same 50 percent urban threshold in 2010 - just as its romcom boom really got going. The multiplexes being constructed at a dizzying rate in the country's fast-growing inland cities needed fresh new products other than blockbusters.What better than the romcom, usually preoccupied with the trials and tribulations of the country's urban elite? 2011's If You Are the One, directed by Feng Xiaogang (often dubbed the "Chinese Spielberg"), sees a millionaire bachelor investor trawl fruitlessly through the internet dating scene. Don't Go Breaking My Heart, from the brilliant Hong Kong director Johnnie To in the same year, sees a stocks analyst flip-flop between a hunky-but-unfaithful hedge-fund manager and a nice-guy architect. One Night Surprise from 2013 is about a creative ad exec who has to track down the father of her baby.Others simply revel in nouveau riche materialism: with the first film culminating in four childhood friends pulling off a Shanghai fashion show, the highly successful Tiny Times series is a Sex and the City-influenced ode to personal empowerment and deluxe living. But then that's nothing new.READ MORE: Superheroes take over HollywoodSeduction regularly went hand-in-hand with the hard sell during the Hollywood Golden Age, too, when fashionably decked-out stars on tryst duty helped shift brand items - and flog the consumerist American Dream. (Ironically, sales of men's vests dropped dramatically after Gable's topless undressing scene in It Happened One Night.)'Being sentimental'Certain filmmakers blatantly reference how much the Chinese romcom follows the American model. The heroine of 2013's Finding Mr Right claims she is travelling to Washington State in homage to her favourite film, the 1993 classic Sleepless in Seattle.Actually, she is there to give birth in an illegal maternity centre - because as she is trophy lover to a rich, married Chinese investor her child wouldn't be legally recognised back home. A similar cast-off beauty, played by Shu Qi, is the love interest in If You Are the One.Maybe this kind of harshness, acknowledging the victims in a ruthless race for sexual and emotional territory, is where the Chinese romcom differs from the American version. Julia Roberts was, of course, a call girl in Pretty Woman, but that's a jumping-off point for a sentimental Pygmalion makeover. You certainly don't see her falling pregnant, or attempti...

The Lima News | Williams and Davis funeral home - Lima Ohio

Monday, July 18, 2016

Davis funeral home had come a long way since 1905.Now, in March 1929, Williams and Davis were opening a state-of-the-art funeral home at 119 N. West St. “The establishment of the new home climaxes 25 years of service by the partnership in Lima and surrounding territory,” the Lima Star and Republican-Gazette wrote. “Williams and Davis are among the pioneer undertakers in this section.”“Especially is the chapel outstanding,” The Lima News gushed. “It has a church-like atmosphere and a seating capacity of 125. An organ of unusual tone quality is at the front of the chapel. The windows of the chapel are stained and the floor has deep carpets.”At the turn of the century, when C.C. (Carey) Williams and O.E. (Otis) Davis arrived, Lima was a bustling, routinely dangerous place. Railroad workers were crushed by trains, runaway horses trampled pedestrians and careless homeowners were occasionally gassed or electrocuted. And the oil industry was booming, at times literally. Oil field deaths could be spectacularly gruesome; the funerals interesting.When an oil field worker from Cleveland named Earl Bush was killed in a nitro-glycerine explosion in October 1902, the Lima Times-Democrat noted that “such of the mortal remains” that could be found were “contained in a box that was about nine or ten inches square” making for an “unusual and pathetic funeral service at the parlors of the Bennett Undertaking establishment.” The day before the service, the story added, searchers, including the new widow, combed the site of the explosion. “They succeeded in finding what is believed to have been a portion of Bush’s scalp. Only a few small fragments of flesh and bone were found by the searchers during the entire day.”Hall W. Bennett’s undertaking establishment was at 114 W. Market St., the former location of an undertaker named James E. Grosjean, who learned embalming and casket making as a young man in Holmes County, and came to Lima in 1892. Grosjean also built electric exhibits that were used in department store window displays. One of these, “Noah’s Ark,” can be seen today at the Allen County Museum.

Heads up: Mount Rushmore marks a milestone this year - Sacramento Bee

Monday, June 06, 2016

American history is taught, but also in popular culture (Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 thriller, “North by Northwest,” rather absurdly climaxes there) and, of course, in tourism. According to the National Park Service, Mount Rushmore National Memorial drew 2.44 million visitors in 2015, ranking 36th in the NPS domain – one spot above Glacier National Park in Montana, and one behind Rock Creek Park. (I had not heard of that latter site; perhaps you have, if you have encountered it inside the Washington, D.C., beltway.) The Brokaw-narrated visitors center film ends with soaring, upbeat verbiage. It lacks any hint of disapproval, but as old-time radio man Paul Harvey used to say, now for the rest of the story.Stone-cold controversyThe Black Hills, a small mountain range that tops out at 7,242 feet, for thousands of years was home to American Indians. In 1868, the Fort Laramie Treaty between native peoples and the U.S. government (Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman was on the negotiating team) essentially promised th...

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Are the Chinese insatiable romantics? - Aljazeera.com

Monday, November 14, 2016

Colbert's mollycoddled heiress falling for Clark Gable's cocky newspaper hack, it featured the ostensibly mismatched lovers we've seen so many times since, as well as the narrowly-averted-wedding climax familiar from the likes of Four Weddings.The new style of comedy fed off social changes in an urbanising America, with the majority living in cities for the first time after the 1920s.READ MORE: Toothless tigers - Can a film please China and the West?The thrilling sense of sexual availability and possibilities on sidewalks, in bureaus and bars brought different walks of life together, putting the entire class system in a cocktail shaker. These metropolitan rhythms propelled the urbane sparring of screwball comedies such as His Girl Friday and Philadelphia Story, a tone still lingering in romcoms at the end of the century.Fascinatingly, China passed the same 50 percent urban threshold in 2010 - just as its romcom boom really got going. The multiplexes being constructed at a dizzying rate in the country's fast-growing inland cities needed fresh new products other than blockbusters.What better than the romcom, usually preoccupied with the trials and tribulations of the country's urban elite? 2011's If You Are the One, directed by Feng Xiaogang (often dubbed the "Chinese Spielberg"), sees a millionaire bachelor investor trawl fruitlessly through the internet dating scene. Don't Go Breaking My Heart, from the brilliant Hong Kong director Johnnie To in the same year, sees a stocks analyst flip-flop between a hunky-but-unfaithful hedge-fund manager and a nice-guy architect. One Night Surprise from 2013 is about a creative ad exec who has to track down the father of her baby.Others simply revel in nouveau riche materialism: with the first film culminating in four childhood friends pulling off a Shanghai fashion show, the highly successful Tiny Times series is a Sex and the City-influenced ode to personal empowerment and deluxe living. But then that's nothing new.READ MORE: Superheroes take over HollywoodSeduction regularly went hand-in-hand with the hard sell during the Hollywood Golden Age, too, when fashionably decked-out stars on tryst duty helped shift brand items - and flog the consumerist American Dream. (Ironically, sales of men's vests dropped dramatically after Gable's topless undressing scene in It Happened One Night.)'Being sentimental'Certain filmmakers blatantly reference how much the Chinese romcom follows the American model. The heroine of 2013's Finding Mr Right claims she is travelling to Washington State in homage to her favourite film, the 1993 classic Sleepless in Seattle.Actually, she is there to give birth in an illegal maternity centre - because as she is trophy lover to a rich, married Chinese investor her child wouldn't be legally recognised back home. A similar cast-off beauty, played by Shu Qi, is the love interest in If You Are the One.Maybe this kind of harshness, acknowledging the victims in a ruthless race for sexual and emotional territory, is where the Chinese romcom differs from the American version. Julia Roberts was, of course, a call girl in Pretty Woman, but that's a jumping-off point for a sentimental Pygmalion makeover. You certainly don't see her falling pregnant, or attempti...

The Lima News | Williams and Davis funeral home - Lima Ohio

Monday, July 18, 2016

Davis funeral home had come a long way since 1905.Now, in March 1929, Williams and Davis were opening a state-of-the-art funeral home at 119 N. West St. “The establishment of the new home climaxes 25 years of service by the partnership in Lima and surrounding territory,” the Lima Star and Republican-Gazette wrote. “Williams and Davis are among the pioneer undertakers in this section.”“Especially is the chapel outstanding,” The Lima News gushed. “It has a church-like atmosphere and a seating capacity of 125. An organ of unusual tone quality is at the front of the chapel. The windows of the chapel are stained and the floor has deep carpets.”At the turn of the century, when C.C. (Carey) Williams and O.E. (Otis) Davis arrived, Lima was a bustling, routinely dangerous place. Railroad workers were crushed by trains, runaway horses trampled pedestrians and careless homeowners were occasionally gassed or electrocuted. And the oil industry was booming, at times literally. Oil field deaths could be spectacularly gruesome; the funerals interesting.When an oil field worker from Cleveland named Earl Bush was killed in a nitro-glycerine explosion in October 1902, the Lima Times-Democrat noted that “such of the mortal remains” that could be found were “contained in a box that was about nine or ten inches square” making for an “unusual and pathetic funeral service at the parlors of the Bennett Undertaking establishment.” The day before the service, the story added, searchers, including the new widow, combed the site of the explosion. “They succeeded in finding what is believed to have been a portion of Bush’s scalp. Only a few small fragments of flesh and bone were found by the searchers during the entire day.”Hall W. Bennett’s undertaking establishment was at 114 W. Market St., the former location of an undertaker named James E. Grosjean, who learned embalming and casket making as a young man in Holmes County, and came to Lima in 1892. Grosjean also built electric exhibits that were used in department store window displays. One of these, “Noah’s Ark,” can be seen today at the Allen County Museum.

Heads up: Mount Rushmore marks a milestone this year - Sacramento Bee

Monday, June 06, 2016

American history is taught, but also in popular culture (Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 thriller, “North by Northwest,” rather absurdly climaxes there) and, of course, in tourism. According to the National Park Service, Mount Rushmore National Memorial drew 2.44 million visitors in 2015, ranking 36th in the NPS domain – one spot above Glacier National Park in Montana, and one behind Rock Creek Park. (I had not heard of that latter site; perhaps you have, if you have encountered it inside the Washington, D.C., beltway.) The Brokaw-narrated visitors center film ends with soaring, upbeat verbiage. It lacks any hint of disapproval, but as old-time radio man Paul Harvey used to say, now for the rest of the story.Stone-cold controversyThe Black Hills, a small mountain range that tops out at 7,242 feet, for thousands of years was home to American Indians. In 1868, the Fort Laramie Treaty between native peoples and the U.S. government (Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman was on the negotiating team) essentially promised th...