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Erikson Vik Funeral Home

201 East Main Avenue
Fertile, MN 56540
(218) 945-6141
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Fertile MN Obituaries and Death Notices

Obit Gives Us an Inside Look at Inside Journalism. It's Not Pretty. - National Review

Monday, May 01, 2017

Demme’s planned project to document the American issue of “right to return” — citizens of New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward who were denied the right to reclaim their flooded homes. Demme found a fertile subject in the charming, articulate, middle-aged Parker, who had survived an unsuccessful marriage, assorted career ventures, genuine tests of faith, and then Katrina. One friend tells Carolyn, ‘We are spiritual beings going through a human experience.’ That realization summarizes Demme’s art. Parker held fast to her cultural and spiritual heritage and her citizen’s rights, which makes this a far richer film than Spike Lee’s two (count ’em) overblown HBO documentaries about Katrina or any of Anderson Cooper’s countless, grandstanding CNN reports/arguments that exploited the disaster. Lee and Cooper both showered typical liberal condescension on less fortunate people, merely to show off their own bourgie political dogma. But Demme worked artistically t...

Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

It described Phelps as an “accomplished electrician.”SEE ALSO: Town of Rodney retains mystical beauty - and 13 residentsFamily members whose roots are 200 years deep in this fertile soil want to share Nitta Yuma with the world, and they have plenty to look at — including nine buildings constructed before the Civil War.“A lot of people preserve their home place, the house they grew up in,” says 60-year-old Henry Vick Phelps III, who grew up on this property and and still lives here, as does his sister, Carolyn May, and his 28-year-old son, Vick. “But we went a little further and kept the other buildings, too.”Phelps credits his grandparents, Henry and Dorothy Phelps, for having the good sense to let the structures be.“We’d like to have a coffee shop, a place where people can stop and relax and then go through the buildings,” Phelps says. “We want to reconstruct the houses back to their original form. We’d like to work with the Delta and serve as an ambassador for the South and for tourism. It’s not going to happen overnight, but it’s something we can do steady along.“I think our audience would be anyone with a passion for old houses and the South and architecture.”Bear tracks and buried dollsNitta Yuma means “bear track” or “trail of the bear” in the Choctaw language.It was settled in 1768, with an original population of 25. In 1805, Burwell Vick purchased the land with jewels from the Choctaws.The land eventually became a plantation owned by Vick’s son, W.H. Vick, who developed what's called the 100 cotton seed in 1843, a seed that that helped planters maximize pounds of cotton per acre and was eventually sold commercially.BILLY WATKINS: Tale of the kid who couldn't throwIn 1901, when the nearly 6,000 acres was divided among the four children, Henry Phelps became owner of the family homestead. It’s now in the hands of his grandchildren and a great-grandchild.And while some of the buildings still need to be renovated, others are ready for viewing.Among them: The general store/doll house and its thousands of occupants.The dolls were owned by Dorothy Cole Phelps, mother of Henry III and Carolyn May.“Her father and uncle owned a funeral home,” May explains. “She and her friends used to act like they were having funerals. They would bury dolls and say a prayer over them.“Later on in life, the memory of burying those dolls bothered her. She started collecting them when she was 35. She died in 2011 when she was 99. What you see here are the dolls she collected over the course of 60 years.”They sit side by side on rows of shelves. Others stare out of glass cases that were part of the store. Many look the same. But then there is the Planter’s Peanut Man, smiling at you like an old friend. There, too, are Bozo, Pop...

Descendants of original Lake Forest families return to St. Patrick to view restored windows - Chicago Tribune

Monday, October 17, 2016

Michael Yore) worked the Erie Canal originally," Lohenry said. "Then he worked in salt mines. People traveled the Erie Canal and would come to Illinois. Then they'd come back and say the land is fertile."Yore decided to move to the Midwest in 1838, according to Tim Klunder, communications director at St. Patrick Church. Klunder's research on the history of the church and the its stained glass windows was recently posted on the church website."They meant to go to Milwaukee but a storm blew their ship off course and they anchored in (what later became) Lake Forest," Klunder said. "He and his family settled near what is now Everett School."Yore was deeded 160 acres near what is now the west Metra train station on Telegraph Road. A missionary circuit rider, Father John Guegnin, began holding Catholic services on Sundays in Yore's home.In 1840, two ships collided near the shoreline of Lake Michigan and dozens of Irish sailors died. Yore and another residents donated land for a cemetery along Telegraph Road to bury the sailors.It was Yore's grandson, Thomas, who paid for a stained glass window at St. Patrick Church. Thomas Yore also helped establish the Deerpath Golf Course.Lohenry said she became interested in researching her genealogy about 20 years ago, a task that at times proved difficult."The son would marry the girl from the farm next door," Lohenry said. "They had a tendency to name their kids the same names. Lots of Josephs and Daniels. It was the most difficult thing to sort out who belonged to who."Lohenry is also descended from the family of John Kennedy, another of Lake Forest's original settlers. John had a son named Edward, a farmer born in 1859, who owned land along what became Kennedy Road. It was Edward who donated the Good Shepherd window and the St. Patrick window to the church.Rocco Dawson is another descendant of an early Lake Forest family. His wife, Margaret, has been researching the family's history for decades.Originally from County Sligo, Ireland, Rocco Dawson's great-grandfather Patrick Dawson made his way to the area in the 1840s, Margaret Da...

Immanuel Lutheran Church celebrates 100 years - The Rolla Daily News

Monday, October 03, 2016

English to a patient congregation. Rolla proved to be fertile ground for the church. “It was a different time totally, than we can ever imagine!” says Dottie.Edward says they are thankful their parents raised them in the church. “They were devout Christians,” he says. “I’ve been a member of this congregation for almost 90 years. I became a baptized member on January 1st, 1927.”He says he seldom misses a service. Dottie jokes and says he has to be there because he makes the coffee for the other church members. Edward says he never gets a complaint about the quality from his coffee making skills.He must make a good cup of joe. A hot cup of coffee was quite the social drink of choice in the 50’s and it was during this time the church had growing pains. The congregation had outgrown the church’s physical size, so the church elders chose a site on 11th and Spring, across from Missouri S&T’s Fitness Center. According to Dottie, in the mid-1970’s, this church also proved to be too small.“They decided to split and have two congregations in Rolla. Redeemer Lutheran [Church] was a branch,” she says. “We’re like families back and forth—we compliment each other.” Dottie notes there are currently 485 members at Immanuel Lutheran.Dottie and Edward have many good memories of fellowship at Immanuel Lutheran. She loved her years of singing in the church choir. Another memory is what she calls “Mission Festival.”“Once a year, a foreign missionary from India or another country would come and we would have a basket dinner and games for the children. The choir would present a special song—it was a big day—an exciting time.”Church dinners could encompass a range of colorful jello molds, macaroni and cheese and plates of cookies, pies and brownies. Dottie laughs and says church goers at Immanuel could always expect a lot of potato salad.“They used to bring ice cream in from the Rolla Creamery in big insulated canvas things to the church picnics.” She says they didn’t worry too much about ticks or chiggers. “There wasn’t any OFF! [mosquito repellent] then, so maybe we scratched a lot!”“The first church picnics I remember were out at the old Haas [saw] mill,” says Edward. It was a nice grassy place and we had a church service and people brought their lunch. There were contests for the children. I looked forward to it every summer.”Edward liked the pies especially. His favorite is apple—or cherry. “To tell the truth about it, I like them all!”Church buildings provide the roof over the heads of believers during times of worship and fellowship activities, but it is the church doctrine that brings families together. “We believe in the inspired Word of God,” says Dottie.“We believe that our sins are forgiven by Jesus’s death and the Gospel’s message. We go very strictly by The Bible of the Old and New Testaments.”Dottie says there is some Germanic culture within the church. “Our order of service that we use at Immanuel is old—probably transcribed from the German. Some of the orders of worship are still used, since I was a child.”She says the liturgy is similar to the Roman Catholics, because Martin Luther was a monk.“He’s the one that gave us the foundation for getting us started. You can sit in a Roman Catholic service and be familiar with it [whether it is Roman Catholic or Lutheran].” But for the Lutherans attending Emmanuel (or Redeemer), Reformation Sunday, the last Sunday in October, will always hold special meaning. After all, Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church, so it is in remembrance of Luther’s reform actions that is near and dear to the church.The church is active in town. “We do a campus ministry,” she explains. The Beta Sigma Psi fraternity is a Lutheran fraternity (on the Missouri S&T campus since 1952) and they worship at Immanuel. Dottie acknowledges that the challenge for Immanuel Lutheran or any church is to get out and get people involved, which is tough with so many distractions such as time-consuming digital lifestyles, which can be isolating. She talks about the dedication and responsibility that is needed ...

Immanuel Lutheran Church celebrates 100 years - News - The ... - Carthage Press

Monday, September 26, 2016

English to a patient congregation. Rolla proved to be fertile ground for the church. “It was a different time totally, than we can ever imagine!” says Dottie.Edward says they are thankful their parents raised them in the church. “They were devout Christians,” he says. “I’ve been a member of this congregation for almost 90 years. I became a baptized member on January 1st, 1927.”He says he seldom misses a service. Dottie jokes and says he has to be there because he makes the coffee for the other church members. Edward says he never gets a complaint about the quality from his coffee making skills.He must make a good cup of joe. A hot cup of coffee was quite the social drink of choice in the 50’s and it was during this time the church had growing pains. The congregation had outgrown the church’s physical size, so the church elders chose a site on 11th and Spring, across from Missouri S&T’s Fitness Center. According to Dottie, in the mid-1970’s, this church also proved to be too small.“They decided to split and have two congregations in Rolla. Redeemer Lutheran [Church] was a branch,” she says. “We’re like families back and forth—we compliment each other.” Dottie notes there are currently 485 members at Immanuel Lutheran.Dottie and Edward have many good memories of fellowship at Immanuel Lutheran. She loved her years of singing in the church choir. Another memory is what she calls “Mission Festival.”“Once a year, a foreign missionary from India or another country would come and we would have a basket dinner and games for the children. The choir would present a special song—it was a big day—an exciting time.”Church dinners could encompass a range of colorful jello molds, macaroni and cheese and plates of cookies, pies and brownies. Dottie laughs and says church goers at Immanuel could always expect a lot of potato salad.“They used to bring ice cream in from the Rolla Creamery in big insulated canvas things to the church picnics.” She says they didn’t worry too much about ticks or chiggers. “There wasn’t any OFF! [mosquito repellent] then, so maybe we scratched a lot!”“The first church picnics I remember were out at the old Haas [saw] mill,” says Edward. It was a nice grassy place and we had a church service and people brought their lunch. There were contests for the children. I looked forward to it every summer.”Edward liked the pies especially. His favorite is apple—or cherry. “To tell the truth about it, I like them all!”Church buildings provide the roof over the heads of believers during times of worship and fellowship activities, but it is the church doctrine that brings families together. “We believe in the inspired Word of God,” says Dottie.“We believe that our sins are forgiven by Jesus’s death and the Gospel’s message. We go very strictly by The Bible of the Old and New Testaments.”Dottie says there is some Germanic culture within the church. “Our order of service that we use at Immanuel is old—probably transcribed from the German. Some of the orders of worship are still used, since I was a child.”She says the liturgy is similar to the Roman Catholics, because Martin Luther was a monk.“He’s the one that gave us the foundation for getting us started. You can sit in a Roman Catholic service and be familiar with it [whether it is Roman Catholic or Lutheran].” But for the Lutherans attending Emmanuel (or Redeemer), Reformation Sunday, the last Sunday in October, will always hold special meaning. After all, Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church, so it is in remembrance of Luther’s reform actions that is near and dear to the church.The church is active in town. “We do a campus ministry,” she explains. The Beta Sigma Psi fraternity is a Lutheran fraternity (on the Missouri S&T campus since 1952) and they worship at Immanuel. Dottie acknowledges that the challenge for Immanuel Lutheran or any church is to get out and get people involved, which is tough with so many distractions such as time-consuming digital lifestyles, which can be isolating. She talks about the dedication and responsibility that is needed ...

Woman, 20, who died in paper mill fall had traveled the world - NJ.com

Monday, September 26, 2016

Wednesday at the Johnson-Walton Funeral Home, 24 Church Road, Holland Township, followed by words of remembrance from 6-7 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to The Commons at Fertile Ground, 120 State Avenue NE, PMB #1420, Olympia, WA 98501.Curry is survived by her parents, Thomas Curry and Dr. Debra (Wohl) Curry of Holland Township; a brother, Brett Curry of Holland Township; and a sister, Candace Redwine of Tennessee. She is also survived by her maternal grandparents, Herbert and Mickey Wohl of Middle Island, N.Y., and many aunts, uncles and cousins.She was predeceased by her paternal grandparents, Vernor and Birdie Curry, and her stepsister, Jennifer Rathel.

Yardsmart: Matilija poppy, queen of California flowers | Siouxland ... - Sioux City Journal

Monday, September 19, 2016

Chumash was led by Chief Matilija during the Spanish period. Many legends connect him to this plant, a bushy poppy that thrives in the sun where soils are light, porous, infertile, well drained, sandy, gravelly and generally poor.The perennial is adapted to high places on slopes and cliffs of the coastal mountain ranges where southwest-facing slopes and alluvial conditions create a deep and well oxygenated root zone. It's the highlight of the garden while in bloom from mid-spring through early summer, sometimes longer. It's visible at long range and rodent proof making this an ideal choice for farms, ranches and rural homes out West.In habitat, the poppy begins growth with the first rains to hit the southern coast. They push up vigorous, upright stems lined with blue gray leaves and eventually topped with flower buds. Then the magic begins as huge crepey white petals unfurl to surround a golden ball of stamens that resemble a fried egg.As blooming ends, the plants gradually decline with summer drought, demanding no additional water until the rainy season returns. The declining stems can be cut to the ground so ornamental grasses take over in its stead for the late summer and fall.All this tells us Matilija is best planted in the fall, especially if dormant. Like all poppies, it's highly sensitive to root disturbance, so handle them with great care during transplantation. The renowned diff...

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Obit Gives Us an Inside Look at Inside Journalism. It's Not Pretty. - National Review

Monday, May 01, 2017

Demme’s planned project to document the American issue of “right to return” — citizens of New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward who were denied the right to reclaim their flooded homes. Demme found a fertile subject in the charming, articulate, middle-aged Parker, who had survived an unsuccessful marriage, assorted career ventures, genuine tests of faith, and then Katrina. One friend tells Carolyn, ‘We are spiritual beings going through a human experience.’ That realization summarizes Demme’s art. Parker held fast to her cultural and spiritual heritage and her citizen’s rights, which makes this a far richer film than Spike Lee’s two (count ’em) overblown HBO documentaries about Katrina or any of Anderson Cooper’s countless, grandstanding CNN reports/arguments that exploited the disaster. Lee and Cooper both showered typical liberal condescension on less fortunate people, merely to show off their own bourgie political dogma. But Demme worked artistically t...

Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

It described Phelps as an “accomplished electrician.”SEE ALSO: Town of Rodney retains mystical beauty - and 13 residentsFamily members whose roots are 200 years deep in this fertile soil want to share Nitta Yuma with the world, and they have plenty to look at — including nine buildings constructed before the Civil War.“A lot of people preserve their home place, the house they grew up in,” says 60-year-old Henry Vick Phelps III, who grew up on this property and and still lives here, as does his sister, Carolyn May, and his 28-year-old son, Vick. “But we went a little further and kept the other buildings, too.”Phelps credits his grandparents, Henry and Dorothy Phelps, for having the good sense to let the structures be.“We’d like to have a coffee shop, a place where people can stop and relax and then go through the buildings,” Phelps says. “We want to reconstruct the houses back to their original form. We’d like to work with the Delta and serve as an ambassador for the South and for tourism. It’s not going to happen overnight, but it’s something we can do steady along.“I think our audience would be anyone with a passion for old houses and the South and architecture.”Bear tracks and buried dollsNitta Yuma means “bear track” or “trail of the bear” in the Choctaw language.It was settled in 1768, with an original population of 25. In 1805, Burwell Vick purchased the land with jewels from the Choctaws.The land eventually became a plantation owned by Vick’s son, W.H. Vick, who developed what's called the 100 cotton seed in 1843, a seed that that helped planters maximize pounds of cotton per acre and was eventually sold commercially.BILLY WATKINS: Tale of the kid who couldn't throwIn 1901, when the nearly 6,000 acres was divided among the four children, Henry Phelps became owner of the family homestead. It’s now in the hands of his grandchildren and a great-grandchild.And while some of the buildings still need to be renovated, others are ready for viewing.Among them: The general store/doll house and its thousands of occupants.The dolls were owned by Dorothy Cole Phelps, mother of Henry III and Carolyn May.“Her father and uncle owned a funeral home,” May explains. “She and her friends used to act like they were having funerals. They would bury dolls and say a prayer over them.“Later on in life, the memory of burying those dolls bothered her. She started collecting them when she was 35. She died in 2011 when she was 99. What you see here are the dolls she collected over the course of 60 years.”They sit side by side on rows of shelves. Others stare out of glass cases that were part of the store. Many look the same. But then there is the Planter’s Peanut Man, smiling at you like an old friend. There, too, are Bozo, Pop...

Descendants of original Lake Forest families return to St. Patrick to view restored windows - Chicago Tribune

Monday, October 17, 2016

Michael Yore) worked the Erie Canal originally," Lohenry said. "Then he worked in salt mines. People traveled the Erie Canal and would come to Illinois. Then they'd come back and say the land is fertile."Yore decided to move to the Midwest in 1838, according to Tim Klunder, communications director at St. Patrick Church. Klunder's research on the history of the church and the its stained glass windows was recently posted on the church website."They meant to go to Milwaukee but a storm blew their ship off course and they anchored in (what later became) Lake Forest," Klunder said. "He and his family settled near what is now Everett School."Yore was deeded 160 acres near what is now the west Metra train station on Telegraph Road. A missionary circuit rider, Father John Guegnin, began holding Catholic services on Sundays in Yore's home.In 1840, two ships collided near the shoreline of Lake Michigan and dozens of Irish sailors died. Yore and another residents donated land for a cemetery along Telegraph Road to bury the sailors.It was Yore's grandson, Thomas, who paid for a stained glass window at St. Patrick Church. Thomas Yore also helped establish the Deerpath Golf Course.Lohenry said she became interested in researching her genealogy about 20 years ago, a task that at times proved difficult."The son would marry the girl from the farm next door," Lohenry said. "They had a tendency to name their kids the same names. Lots of Josephs and Daniels. It was the most difficult thing to sort out who belonged to who."Lohenry is also descended from the family of John Kennedy, another of Lake Forest's original settlers. John had a son named Edward, a farmer born in 1859, who owned land along what became Kennedy Road. It was Edward who donated the Good Shepherd window and the St. Patrick window to the church.Rocco Dawson is another descendant of an early Lake Forest family. His wife, Margaret, has been researching the family's history for decades.Originally from County Sligo, Ireland, Rocco Dawson's great-grandfather Patrick Dawson made his way to the area in the 1840s, Margaret Da...

Immanuel Lutheran Church celebrates 100 years - The Rolla Daily News

Monday, October 03, 2016

English to a patient congregation. Rolla proved to be fertile ground for the church. “It was a different time totally, than we can ever imagine!” says Dottie.Edward says they are thankful their parents raised them in the church. “They were devout Christians,” he says. “I’ve been a member of this congregation for almost 90 years. I became a baptized member on January 1st, 1927.”He says he seldom misses a service. Dottie jokes and says he has to be there because he makes the coffee for the other church members. Edward says he never gets a complaint about the quality from his coffee making skills.He must make a good cup of joe. A hot cup of coffee was quite the social drink of choice in the 50’s and it was during this time the church had growing pains. The congregation had outgrown the church’s physical size, so the church elders chose a site on 11th and Spring, across from Missouri S&T’s Fitness Center. According to Dottie, in the mid-1970’s, this church also proved to be too small.“They decided to split and have two congregations in Rolla. Redeemer Lutheran [Church] was a branch,” she says. “We’re like families back and forth—we compliment each other.” Dottie notes there are currently 485 members at Immanuel Lutheran.Dottie and Edward have many good memories of fellowship at Immanuel Lutheran. She loved her years of singing in the church choir. Another memory is what she calls “Mission Festival.”“Once a year, a foreign missionary from India or another country would come and we would have a basket dinner and games for the children. The choir would present a special song—it was a big day—an exciting time.”Church dinners could encompass a range of colorful jello molds, macaroni and cheese and plates of cookies, pies and brownies. Dottie laughs and says church goers at Immanuel could always expect a lot of potato salad.“They used to bring ice cream in from the Rolla Creamery in big insulated canvas things to the church picnics.” She says they didn’t worry too much about ticks or chiggers. “There wasn’t any OFF! [mosquito repellent] then, so maybe we scratched a lot!”“The first church picnics I remember were out at the old Haas [saw] mill,” says Edward. It was a nice grassy place and we had a church service and people brought their lunch. There were contests for the children. I looked forward to it every summer.”Edward liked the pies especially. His favorite is apple—or cherry. “To tell the truth about it, I like them all!”Church buildings provide the roof over the heads of believers during times of worship and fellowship activities, but it is the church doctrine that brings families together. “We believe in the inspired Word of God,” says Dottie.“We believe that our sins are forgiven by Jesus’s death and the Gospel’s message. We go very strictly by The Bible of the Old and New Testaments.”Dottie says there is some Germanic culture within the church. “Our order of service that we use at Immanuel is old—probably transcribed from the German. Some of the orders of worship are still used, since I was a child.”She says the liturgy is similar to the Roman Catholics, because Martin Luther was a monk.“He’s the one that gave us the foundation for getting us started. You can sit in a Roman Catholic service and be familiar with it [whether it is Roman Catholic or Lutheran].” But for the Lutherans attending Emmanuel (or Redeemer), Reformation Sunday, the last Sunday in October, will always hold special meaning. After all, Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church, so it is in remembrance of Luther’s reform actions that is near and dear to the church.The church is active in town. “We do a campus ministry,” she explains. The Beta Sigma Psi fraternity is a Lutheran fraternity (on the Missouri S&T campus since 1952) and they worship at Immanuel. Dottie acknowledges that the challenge for Immanuel Lutheran or any church is to get out and get people involved, which is tough with so many distractions such as time-consuming digital lifestyles, which can be isolating. She talks about the dedication and responsibility that is needed ...

Immanuel Lutheran Church celebrates 100 years - News - The ... - Carthage Press

Monday, September 26, 2016

English to a patient congregation. Rolla proved to be fertile ground for the church. “It was a different time totally, than we can ever imagine!” says Dottie.Edward says they are thankful their parents raised them in the church. “They were devout Christians,” he says. “I’ve been a member of this congregation for almost 90 years. I became a baptized member on January 1st, 1927.”He says he seldom misses a service. Dottie jokes and says he has to be there because he makes the coffee for the other church members. Edward says he never gets a complaint about the quality from his coffee making skills.He must make a good cup of joe. A hot cup of coffee was quite the social drink of choice in the 50’s and it was during this time the church had growing pains. The congregation had outgrown the church’s physical size, so the church elders chose a site on 11th and Spring, across from Missouri S&T’s Fitness Center. According to Dottie, in the mid-1970’s, this church also proved to be too small.“They decided to split and have two congregations in Rolla. Redeemer Lutheran [Church] was a branch,” she says. “We’re like families back and forth—we compliment each other.” Dottie notes there are currently 485 members at Immanuel Lutheran.Dottie and Edward have many good memories of fellowship at Immanuel Lutheran. She loved her years of singing in the church choir. Another memory is what she calls “Mission Festival.”“Once a year, a foreign missionary from India or another country would come and we would have a basket dinner and games for the children. The choir would present a special song—it was a big day—an exciting time.”Church dinners could encompass a range of colorful jello molds, macaroni and cheese and plates of cookies, pies and brownies. Dottie laughs and says church goers at Immanuel could always expect a lot of potato salad.“They used to bring ice cream in from the Rolla Creamery in big insulated canvas things to the church picnics.” She says they didn’t worry too much about ticks or chiggers. “There wasn’t any OFF! [mosquito repellent] then, so maybe we scratched a lot!”“The first church picnics I remember were out at the old Haas [saw] mill,” says Edward. It was a nice grassy place and we had a church service and people brought their lunch. There were contests for the children. I looked forward to it every summer.”Edward liked the pies especially. His favorite is apple—or cherry. “To tell the truth about it, I like them all!”Church buildings provide the roof over the heads of believers during times of worship and fellowship activities, but it is the church doctrine that brings families together. “We believe in the inspired Word of God,” says Dottie.“We believe that our sins are forgiven by Jesus’s death and the Gospel’s message. We go very strictly by The Bible of the Old and New Testaments.”Dottie says there is some Germanic culture within the church. “Our order of service that we use at Immanuel is old—probably transcribed from the German. Some of the orders of worship are still used, since I was a child.”She says the liturgy is similar to the Roman Catholics, because Martin Luther was a monk.“He’s the one that gave us the foundation for getting us started. You can sit in a Roman Catholic service and be familiar with it [whether it is Roman Catholic or Lutheran].” But for the Lutherans attending Emmanuel (or Redeemer), Reformation Sunday, the last Sunday in October, will always hold special meaning. After all, Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church, so it is in remembrance of Luther’s reform actions that is near and dear to the church.The church is active in town. “We do a campus ministry,” she explains. The Beta Sigma Psi fraternity is a Lutheran fraternity (on the Missouri S&T campus since 1952) and they worship at Immanuel. Dottie acknowledges that the challenge for Immanuel Lutheran or any church is to get out and get people involved, which is tough with so many distractions such as time-consuming digital lifestyles, which can be isolating. She talks about the dedication and responsibility that is needed ...

Woman, 20, who died in paper mill fall had traveled the world - NJ.com

Monday, September 26, 2016

Wednesday at the Johnson-Walton Funeral Home, 24 Church Road, Holland Township, followed by words of remembrance from 6-7 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to The Commons at Fertile Ground, 120 State Avenue NE, PMB #1420, Olympia, WA 98501.Curry is survived by her parents, Thomas Curry and Dr. Debra (Wohl) Curry of Holland Township; a brother, Brett Curry of Holland Township; and a sister, Candace Redwine of Tennessee. She is also survived by her maternal grandparents, Herbert and Mickey Wohl of Middle Island, N.Y., and many aunts, uncles and cousins.She was predeceased by her paternal grandparents, Vernor and Birdie Curry, and her stepsister, Jennifer Rathel.

Yardsmart: Matilija poppy, queen of California flowers | Siouxland ... - Sioux City Journal

Monday, September 19, 2016

Chumash was led by Chief Matilija during the Spanish period. Many legends connect him to this plant, a bushy poppy that thrives in the sun where soils are light, porous, infertile, well drained, sandy, gravelly and generally poor.The perennial is adapted to high places on slopes and cliffs of the coastal mountain ranges where southwest-facing slopes and alluvial conditions create a deep and well oxygenated root zone. It's the highlight of the garden while in bloom from mid-spring through early summer, sometimes longer. It's visible at long range and rodent proof making this an ideal choice for farms, ranches and rural homes out West.In habitat, the poppy begins growth with the first rains to hit the southern coast. They push up vigorous, upright stems lined with blue gray leaves and eventually topped with flower buds. Then the magic begins as huge crepey white petals unfurl to surround a golden ball of stamens that resemble a fried egg.As blooming ends, the plants gradually decline with summer drought, demanding no additional water until the rainy season returns. The declining stems can be cut to the ground so ornamental grasses take over in its stead for the late summer and fall.All this tells us Matilija is best planted in the fall, especially if dormant. Like all poppies, it's highly sensitive to root disturbance, so handle them with great care during transplantation. The renowned diff...