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Totzke Funeral Home

2100 Broadway Avenue
Slayton, MN 56172
(507) 836-6179
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Slayton MN Obituaries and Death Notices

Death and Funeral Notices for March 6 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, March 06, 2017

Starrville Cemetery. Croley Funeral Home, Hawkins. AMOS FOSTER, 92, Bowie; Visitation 1-2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home. Funeral service 2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. DOYLE SLAYTON, 83, Jacksonville; Graveside service 2 p.m. Monday at Still Waters Memorial Gardens. Autry Funeral Home, Jacksonville. JOHN ALAN TURNER, 23, Mineola; Memorial service 10 a.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. FUNERALS TOMORROW DAN L. BOREN, 82, Tyler; Visitation 5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Tuesday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home, Tyler. GLOREETA INEZ BURKS, 81, Gainesville, formerly of Tyler; Funeral service 2 p.m. at Greenwood Baptist Church, Wise County. Geo. Carroll & Son Funeral Home, Gainesville. GERALD L. MORRIS, Ph.D., Tyler; Memorial service 2 p.m. Tuesday at First Baptist Church. Visitation following service. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler. LOUISE MARIE (HOFFMAN) O’SULLIVAN, 93, Tyler; Rosary and visitation 6-8 p.m. Monday at Lloyd James Funeral Home. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler.

Tyler Morning Telegraph - Death and Funeral Notices for March 6 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, March 06, 2017

Starrville Cemetery. Croley Funeral Home, Hawkins. AMOS FOSTER, 92, Bowie; Visitation 1-2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home. Funeral service 2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. DOYLE SLAYTON, 83, Jacksonville; Graveside service 2 p.m. Monday at Still Waters Memorial Gardens. Autry Funeral Home, Jacksonville. JOHN ALAN TURNER, 23, Mineola; Memorial service 10 a.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. FUNERALS TOMORROW DAN L. BOREN, 82, Tyler; Visitation 5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Tuesday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home, Tyler. GLOREETA INEZ BURKS, 81, Gainesville, formerly of Tyler; Funeral service 2 p.m. at Greenwood Baptist Church, Wise County. Geo. Carroll & Son Funeral Home, Gainesville. GERALD L. MORRIS, Ph.D., Tyler; Memorial service 2 p.m. Tuesday at First Baptist Church. Visitation following service. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler. LOUISE MARIE (HOFFMAN) O’SULLIVAN, 93, Tyler; Rosary and visitation 6-8 p.m. Monday at Lloyd James Funeral Home. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler.

John Glenn, first American to orbit the Earth, dies at 95 - Washington Post

Monday, December 12, 2016

Mercury program — the others were M. Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom, Walter M. “Wally” Schirra Jr., Alan B. Shepard Jr. and Donald K. “Deke” Slayton — Mr. Glenn was the oldest and the lone Marine. A lieutenant colonel at the time — who ultimately became a full colonel — he also had the highest rank and the most combat experience.He did not drink, smoke or swear and maintained a disciplined, straight-arrow manner while training in Cocoa Beach, Fla., near NASA’s space center at Cape Canaveral. Comfortable in front of cameras — which followed the astronauts everywhere after they signed a $500,000 deal with Life magazine for a series of exclusive stories — Mr. Glenn was in many ways the public face of NASA.Privately, however, there was friction among the “Magnificent Seven,” as the Mercury astronauts were dubbed in the news media. Concerned that some of his colleagues’ dalliances with women could lead to bad publicity and jeopardize the manned space program, Mr. Glenn confronted his fellow astronauts, admonishing them to avoid any semblance of wrongdoing.“There was no doubt whatsoever that Glenn meant every word of it,” Wolfe wrote in his 1979 book, “The Right Stuff.” “When he got his back up, he was formidable. He was not to be trifled with.”Not all of the astronauts were pleased with Mr. Glenn’s righteousness, however, and Shepard told him to mind his own business.“His moralizing led to colorful and heated exchanges among the pilots, and it wasn’t pleasant banter,” Shepard and Slayton wrote in their 1995 book, “Moon Shot.”When the astronauts voted among themselves to confer the honor of being the first American in space, they chose Shepard.On May 5, 1961, Shepard had a 15-minute suborbital space flight, followed two months later by Grissom on a similar mission. But two Soviet cosmonauts had already circled the Earth by August 1961.Mr. Glenn’s turn came on Feb. 20, 1962. After 11 delays because of bad weather or faulty equipment, he sat in his tiny space capsule, the Friendship 7, atop an MA-6 rocket that had failed in 40 percent of its test flights.After liftoff at 9:47 a.m., backup pilot Carpenter said on an internal tape later released to the public, “Godspeed, John Glenn.”The moment was shared by practically the entire nation, as a television audience of 135 million — the largest up to that time — witnessed the launch.After the first of three scheduled orbits, the capsule began to wobble. Mr. Glenn overrode the automatic navigation system and piloted Friendship 7 with manual controls, reaching a height of 162 miles above the Earth’s surface.Midway through the flight, a warning light indicated that the heat shield, which would protect the capsule during its reentry into Earth’s atmosphere, might have come loose. Without a heat shield, it was possible that Mr. Glenn could burn up inside the capsule as it raced back from space.As Friendship 7 was descending, all radio contact was lost. Shepard, acting as “capsule communicator” from Cape Canaveral, tried to reach Mr. Glenn in his spacecraft, saying, “How do you read? Over.”After about 4 minutes and 20 seconds of silence, Mr. Glenn could finally be heard: “Loud and clear. How me?”“How are you doing?” Shepard asked.“Oh, pretty good,” Mr. Glenn casually responded, later adding, “but that was a real fireball, boy.

Ormie King: Remembering the Miracle Maroons 10 years later - Auburn Citizen

Monday, July 25, 2016

Dick Paulino, Betty Dean, Chris Yantch, Ukranian Society, Gerard Martin, Anonymous, Tompkins Trust, Doug Sochan, Amy Cox, Mike Glancy, Jean Bradley, Don Delaney, John Scanlan, Mike Nellenbeck, Jim Slayton, Bill Gabak, Mike Corcoran, Doug Mason, John Plume, Vivian Renken, Bill Stuart, Henry Renken, Dale Rescott, Chris Lepak, Jack Hai, Millie Ceferatti, Jim Atkinson, Mary Ann DeMasi, Bill Jacobs, Bob Calimeri, Kathy Welch, Mike Pagano, Marilyn Fandrich, John Tanous, Tony LoCastro, Stephen Donnelly, Lee Michaels, Mark Fandrich, Dr. Tom Donahue, Bill Lowery, Bob Wojnar, Bob Williams, Bill Noonan, Laura Moraghan, Joan Powers, Bob Honchanski, Fred Richardson, Dave Emerson, Ted Cheche, Ed DeFelice, Bill Foley, Bill Catto, Jim Courtney, Lois and Toby Rosekrans, Barb Emig, Bob Gallager, Ted Graney, Joe Lober, Sean Lattimore, Elizabeth Prentice, Ed Charles, Dr. Joe Graney, Brian Rabuano, Jerry Wetherby, Steve Pelc, Paul Ringwood, Sarah Rinehart, Ginny Chalanick, Joey Catalone — all for a total of just over $12,000!! Many thanks to you all! I thought back then this whole scenario would have made a great movie, and I still think it would today.Remember, around that same time we lost our greatest Auburn sports writer ever, Leo Pinckney, whose funeral was the same day as the final game.

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Death and Funeral Notices for March 6 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, March 06, 2017

Starrville Cemetery. Croley Funeral Home, Hawkins. AMOS FOSTER, 92, Bowie; Visitation 1-2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home. Funeral service 2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. DOYLE SLAYTON, 83, Jacksonville; Graveside service 2 p.m. Monday at Still Waters Memorial Gardens. Autry Funeral Home, Jacksonville. JOHN ALAN TURNER, 23, Mineola; Memorial service 10 a.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. FUNERALS TOMORROW DAN L. BOREN, 82, Tyler; Visitation 5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Tuesday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home, Tyler. GLOREETA INEZ BURKS, 81, Gainesville, formerly of Tyler; Funeral service 2 p.m. at Greenwood Baptist Church, Wise County. Geo. Carroll & Son Funeral Home, Gainesville. GERALD L. MORRIS, Ph.D., Tyler; Memorial service 2 p.m. Tuesday at First Baptist Church. Visitation following service. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler. LOUISE MARIE (HOFFMAN) O’SULLIVAN, 93, Tyler; Rosary and visitation 6-8 p.m. Monday at Lloyd James Funeral Home. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler.

Tyler Morning Telegraph - Death and Funeral Notices for March 6 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, March 06, 2017

Starrville Cemetery. Croley Funeral Home, Hawkins. AMOS FOSTER, 92, Bowie; Visitation 1-2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home. Funeral service 2 p.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. DOYLE SLAYTON, 83, Jacksonville; Graveside service 2 p.m. Monday at Still Waters Memorial Gardens. Autry Funeral Home, Jacksonville. JOHN ALAN TURNER, 23, Mineola; Memorial service 10 a.m. Monday at Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola. FUNERALS TOMORROW DAN L. BOREN, 82, Tyler; Visitation 5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home. Funeral service 10 a.m. Tuesday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home, Tyler. GLOREETA INEZ BURKS, 81, Gainesville, formerly of Tyler; Funeral service 2 p.m. at Greenwood Baptist Church, Wise County. Geo. Carroll & Son Funeral Home, Gainesville. GERALD L. MORRIS, Ph.D., Tyler; Memorial service 2 p.m. Tuesday at First Baptist Church. Visitation following service. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler. LOUISE MARIE (HOFFMAN) O’SULLIVAN, 93, Tyler; Rosary and visitation 6-8 p.m. Monday at Lloyd James Funeral Home. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Lloyd James Funeral Home, Tyler.

John Glenn, first American to orbit the Earth, dies at 95 - Washington Post

Monday, December 12, 2016

Mercury program — the others were M. Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom, Walter M. “Wally” Schirra Jr., Alan B. Shepard Jr. and Donald K. “Deke” Slayton — Mr. Glenn was the oldest and the lone Marine. A lieutenant colonel at the time — who ultimately became a full colonel — he also had the highest rank and the most combat experience.He did not drink, smoke or swear and maintained a disciplined, straight-arrow manner while training in Cocoa Beach, Fla., near NASA’s space center at Cape Canaveral. Comfortable in front of cameras — which followed the astronauts everywhere after they signed a $500,000 deal with Life magazine for a series of exclusive stories — Mr. Glenn was in many ways the public face of NASA.Privately, however, there was friction among the “Magnificent Seven,” as the Mercury astronauts were dubbed in the news media. Concerned that some of his colleagues’ dalliances with women could lead to bad publicity and jeopardize the manned space program, Mr. Glenn confronted his fellow astronauts, admonishing them to avoid any semblance of wrongdoing.“There was no doubt whatsoever that Glenn meant every word of it,” Wolfe wrote in his 1979 book, “The Right Stuff.” “When he got his back up, he was formidable. He was not to be trifled with.”Not all of the astronauts were pleased with Mr. Glenn’s righteousness, however, and Shepard told him to mind his own business.“His moralizing led to colorful and heated exchanges among the pilots, and it wasn’t pleasant banter,” Shepard and Slayton wrote in their 1995 book, “Moon Shot.”When the astronauts voted among themselves to confer the honor of being the first American in space, they chose Shepard.On May 5, 1961, Shepard had a 15-minute suborbital space flight, followed two months later by Grissom on a similar mission. But two Soviet cosmonauts had already circled the Earth by August 1961.Mr. Glenn’s turn came on Feb. 20, 1962. After 11 delays because of bad weather or faulty equipment, he sat in his tiny space capsule, the Friendship 7, atop an MA-6 rocket that had failed in 40 percent of its test flights.After liftoff at 9:47 a.m., backup pilot Carpenter said on an internal tape later released to the public, “Godspeed, John Glenn.”The moment was shared by practically the entire nation, as a television audience of 135 million — the largest up to that time — witnessed the launch.After the first of three scheduled orbits, the capsule began to wobble. Mr. Glenn overrode the automatic navigation system and piloted Friendship 7 with manual controls, reaching a height of 162 miles above the Earth’s surface.Midway through the flight, a warning light indicated that the heat shield, which would protect the capsule during its reentry into Earth’s atmosphere, might have come loose. Without a heat shield, it was possible that Mr. Glenn could burn up inside the capsule as it raced back from space.As Friendship 7 was descending, all radio contact was lost. Shepard, acting as “capsule communicator” from Cape Canaveral, tried to reach Mr. Glenn in his spacecraft, saying, “How do you read? Over.”After about 4 minutes and 20 seconds of silence, Mr. Glenn could finally be heard: “Loud and clear. How me?”“How are you doing?” Shepard asked.“Oh, pretty good,” Mr. Glenn casually responded, later adding, “but that was a real fireball, boy.

Ormie King: Remembering the Miracle Maroons 10 years later - Auburn Citizen

Monday, July 25, 2016

Dick Paulino, Betty Dean, Chris Yantch, Ukranian Society, Gerard Martin, Anonymous, Tompkins Trust, Doug Sochan, Amy Cox, Mike Glancy, Jean Bradley, Don Delaney, John Scanlan, Mike Nellenbeck, Jim Slayton, Bill Gabak, Mike Corcoran, Doug Mason, John Plume, Vivian Renken, Bill Stuart, Henry Renken, Dale Rescott, Chris Lepak, Jack Hai, Millie Ceferatti, Jim Atkinson, Mary Ann DeMasi, Bill Jacobs, Bob Calimeri, Kathy Welch, Mike Pagano, Marilyn Fandrich, John Tanous, Tony LoCastro, Stephen Donnelly, Lee Michaels, Mark Fandrich, Dr. Tom Donahue, Bill Lowery, Bob Wojnar, Bob Williams, Bill Noonan, Laura Moraghan, Joan Powers, Bob Honchanski, Fred Richardson, Dave Emerson, Ted Cheche, Ed DeFelice, Bill Foley, Bill Catto, Jim Courtney, Lois and Toby Rosekrans, Barb Emig, Bob Gallager, Ted Graney, Joe Lober, Sean Lattimore, Elizabeth Prentice, Ed Charles, Dr. Joe Graney, Brian Rabuano, Jerry Wetherby, Steve Pelc, Paul Ringwood, Sarah Rinehart, Ginny Chalanick, Joey Catalone — all for a total of just over $12,000!! Many thanks to you all! I thought back then this whole scenario would have made a great movie, and I still think it would today.Remember, around that same time we lost our greatest Auburn sports writer ever, Leo Pinckney, whose funeral was the same day as the final game.