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Brenny Funeral Home and Cremation Service

309 4th Street Northeast
Staples, MN 56479
(218) 894-1910
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Staples MN Obituaries and Death Notices

Barbara Tebbs

Monday, June 26, 2017

Mrs. Barbara J. Tebbs, age 82 years, of Jefferson City, Mo., died Monday, June 19, 2017 at her home.Barbara was born July 6, 1934 in Mexico, Mo. the daughter of Joe S. and Merle L. Ross Staples. She was married on February 18, 1956 in Jefferson City, Mo. to Jack L. Tebbs who preceded her in death on June 21, 1997.A lifelong resident of the Central Missouri area, Barbara was a 1952 graduate of Mexico High School, Mexico, Mo.Barbara was employed in the Food Service Dept. of the Jefferson City Public Schools from September, 1970 until her retirement in April, 1993. Previously, she had been employed with the Missouri Dept. of Education and the Missouri Division of Employment Security.She was a member of the First Baptist Church where she taught Sunday School for children for over twenty years. Survivors include: two daughters, Sheryl Isenhart and her husband Ron of Hartsburg, Mo. and Lauren Hubble and her husband Steve of Jefferson City, Mo.; two brothers, Sidney Staples and his wife Candy of Mexico, Mo. and Kenneth Staples and his wife Sabine of Colorado Springs, Colorado; four grandchildren, Lucas Isenhart and his wife Shana, Garrett Isenhart and his fiancée, Jana, M...

Gregg Allman laid to rest next to brother Duane in Macon - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Nashville, Tenn., and The Allman Brothers Band formed in Jacksonville, Fla., the iconic band’s creative home was Macon, home to their Capricorn Records label, which produced dozens of now-classic staples on rock radio – “Ramblin’ Man,” “Melissa” and “Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More” among them.Local resident Amanda Williamson said she was proud that Allman was part of the musical history of Macon.“Being your hometown, it’s nice that it’s being recognized,” she said.A pack of limousines delivered family members to the chapel entrance on Cherry Street, which was closed to traffic.President Jimmy Carter, a longtime friend of Allman’s, attended with his son, Chip; they arrived in a white passenger van that zipped around to the back entrance.Cher, in a fashionable hat and black and white pants ensemble, exited a dark Suburban with her head down, wearing dark sunglasses and a somber expression.She and Carter shared a hug inside the chapel.Those in attendance during the intimate ceremony of fewer than 200 people included Live Nation Atlanta president Peter Conlon and Allman’s longtime publicist Ken Weinstein. They described a warm, loving presentation that focused on Allman’s dedication as a father.Eulogies were delivered by Allman children Devon, Delilah Island and Layla Brooklyn, as well as Duane Allman’s daughter Galadrielle, Allman’s trusted manager Michael Lehman and his lifelong friend Hewell “Chank” Middleton Jr. – all who knew that “Gregg Allman” was the performer, but “Gregory Allman” was the man.Among the sentiments shared was that Allman “healed himself with music and he healed the world with music.” The gathered flock sang the hymn “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” before pallbearers Elijah Blue, Devon and Michael Allman, Trucks and Middleton carried the coffin out of the chapel.After the short procession from Snow’s Memorial Chapel to Rose Hill Cemetery – where more fans lined Riverside Drive - the gravesite ceremony commenced.As the 10-minute service concluded, Cher plucked a white rose from the flower blanket draping the coffin as she and several others paused at the fence surrounding the tombstones of Duane Allman and Oakley.Moments after the mourners departed, a freight train rumbled by a few hundred yards away — a powerful, final salute to Southern rock royalty.MORE ABOUT GREGG ALLMANRead and sign the online guestbookThe Allman Brothers Museum in Macon: The Big House still rocksFlashback: The Allman Brothers and Macon’s magical music history tourThe time Gregg Allman played a solo gig in Atlanta’s Music Midtown festivalFlashback: Gregg Allman overcame addictions and failure in his solo music careerFor updates on the death of Gregg Allman, follow the AJC Music Scene blog on Facebook or Twitter...

Obituary: PR man Bob Goff, promoter of Minnesotans and DFL politics, dies at 80 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Goff said in an interview with the Star Tribune last August. "This company has always done that. That part of it I'm very proud of."Robert Eugene Goff was born in 1936. He grew up in Staples, Minn., a small city about 30 miles west of Brainerd. He graduated St. Cloud State University in 1958 with a degree in social studies education and an emphasis on history. Goff went on to teach American history at Mounds View High School until 1963.As a teacher, Goff became active in DFL politics. He worked on numerous political campaigns, including John F. Kennedy's presidential run in 1960, many times helping with writing and placing advertisements for candidates across the state. After he left teaching, Goff became a senior aide to Gov. Karl Rolvaag, who served from 1963-67.In 1966, the day after Goff helped Nick Coleman be re-elected to the Minnesota Senate, Coleman asked Goff to form an advertising agency with him. Coleman and Goff Advertising was established that month. Goff described Coleman as the more talented out of the pair."It was always a great wonderment to me that somebody would ask that I would write something," Goff said.Nick Coleman's son, St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman, said Goff was one of the most "wickedly smart and brilliantly funny" people that he had ever met and that it was no surprise why his father had chosen to partner with him."I think in Bob he found a partner that understood the merger of his political life with the public relations side of it," the mayor said.Goff described the ad business in that era as the Wild West with "big bucks" being spent on advertising work done by out-of-town agencies. Goff said he and Coleman prided themselves on offering clients more affordable options.The agency was one of Minnesota's first public relations practices and served a range of clients, including Blue Cross Blue Shield, Polaris...

Good cooking takes root: Promoting healthy dietary change through connection to the African diaspora - Model D

Monday, March 06, 2017

The recipes and formulations in the Taste of Africa diet rely on replacing some of the dangerous staples of "soul food"—often high in sodium—with an array of traditional spices from the African diaspora, such as allspice, curry, and cilantro, that might feature flavors that children find strong. But the course doesn't propose radical or unsustainable lifestyle alterations, instead seeking to incorporate substitutions and gradual changes in habits."I came to this work while I was changing my own diet," says Bynum. "It's a gradual process.""I gave up pop a couple years ago," another participant puts in. "The other day, at a church gathering, they had a pitcher of what I thought was water, and it turned out to be Sprite. I took a sip by accident and was horrified by how sweet it was. I lost the taste for it."The class's youngest member does the honors with a spice preparation she helped measure Even small changes to diet and lifestyle can have massive long-term benefits, especially when they are imparted to younger generations. In the kitchen, and under careful supervision, the youngest class member, eight-years old, helps measure out the ingredients for a flavorful rice dish, a chickpea salad, and a Caribbean Coconut Red Beans dish. The kitchen buzzes with energy, women swapping stories, cooking tips, and flavorful aromas. Ben Washburn, MOSES treasurer and representative of Christ the King Catholic Church, helped facilitate the class. "We see education and experiences like this as a foundational way of building a strong congregation," Washburn says. "Just look at this place. Who wouldn't want to be a part of something like this?"It's true that collective food preparation and sharing meals falls increasingly by the wayside in the name of convenience, round-the-clock working hours, and fractured communities. So perhaps it's not only a culinary heritage that classes like this are hoping to reclaim, but one of togetherness, mutual support, and mealtimes as a positive and inter-generational experience. For more information about the series and other future nutrition education series, visit the Detroit Food Policy Council online.This article is part of Michigan Nightlight, a series of stories about the programs and people that positively impact the lives of Michigan kids. It is made possible with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Read more in the series here.All photos by the author.Let's block ads! a href...

Death and Funeral Notices for Dec. 27 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, January 09, 2017

Wednesday at First Baptist Church of Mineola. Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola.JOSHUA RYKER LIPSTEIN, 2 months, Henderson; Funeral ser­vice 2 p.m. Wednesday at Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson.GAY STAPLES LOWERY, 70, Tyler; Memorial service 2 p.m. Wednesday at First Presbyterian Church. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler.LONNIE RAY POOLE, 90, New London; Visitation 1-3 p.m. Wednesday at Cottle-Pearson Funeral Home. Funeral ser­vice 3 p.m. Wednesday at Cottle-Pearson Funeral Home, Overton.BETTY JEAN STEWART, 79, Tyler; Visitation 5-7 p.m. Tuesday at Stewart Family Funeral Home. Celebration of life service 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler.DAISY LOVE WELLS, 98, Tyler; Visitation 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home. Graveside service 2 p.m. Wednesday at Rose Hill Cemetery. Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home.GEORGE FOWLER WILLIAMS, 88, Tyler; Visitation 4-6 p.m. Wednesday at Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler.

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Barbara Tebbs

Monday, June 26, 2017

Mrs. Barbara J. Tebbs, age 82 years, of Jefferson City, Mo., died Monday, June 19, 2017 at her home.Barbara was born July 6, 1934 in Mexico, Mo. the daughter of Joe S. and Merle L. Ross Staples. She was married on February 18, 1956 in Jefferson City, Mo. to Jack L. Tebbs who preceded her in death on June 21, 1997.A lifelong resident of the Central Missouri area, Barbara was a 1952 graduate of Mexico High School, Mexico, Mo.Barbara was employed in the Food Service Dept. of the Jefferson City Public Schools from September, 1970 until her retirement in April, 1993. Previously, she had been employed with the Missouri Dept. of Education and the Missouri Division of Employment Security.She was a member of the First Baptist Church where she taught Sunday School for children for over twenty years. Survivors include: two daughters, Sheryl Isenhart and her husband Ron of Hartsburg, Mo. and Lauren Hubble and her husband Steve of Jefferson City, Mo.; two brothers, Sidney Staples and his wife Candy of Mexico, Mo. and Kenneth Staples and his wife Sabine of Colorado Springs, Colorado; four grandchildren, Lucas Isenhart and his wife Shana, Garrett Isenhart and his fiancée, Jana, M...

Gregg Allman laid to rest next to brother Duane in Macon - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Nashville, Tenn., and The Allman Brothers Band formed in Jacksonville, Fla., the iconic band’s creative home was Macon, home to their Capricorn Records label, which produced dozens of now-classic staples on rock radio – “Ramblin’ Man,” “Melissa” and “Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More” among them.Local resident Amanda Williamson said she was proud that Allman was part of the musical history of Macon.“Being your hometown, it’s nice that it’s being recognized,” she said.A pack of limousines delivered family members to the chapel entrance on Cherry Street, which was closed to traffic.President Jimmy Carter, a longtime friend of Allman’s, attended with his son, Chip; they arrived in a white passenger van that zipped around to the back entrance.Cher, in a fashionable hat and black and white pants ensemble, exited a dark Suburban with her head down, wearing dark sunglasses and a somber expression.She and Carter shared a hug inside the chapel.Those in attendance during the intimate ceremony of fewer than 200 people included Live Nation Atlanta president Peter Conlon and Allman’s longtime publicist Ken Weinstein. They described a warm, loving presentation that focused on Allman’s dedication as a father.Eulogies were delivered by Allman children Devon, Delilah Island and Layla Brooklyn, as well as Duane Allman’s daughter Galadrielle, Allman’s trusted manager Michael Lehman and his lifelong friend Hewell “Chank” Middleton Jr. – all who knew that “Gregg Allman” was the performer, but “Gregory Allman” was the man.Among the sentiments shared was that Allman “healed himself with music and he healed the world with music.” The gathered flock sang the hymn “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” before pallbearers Elijah Blue, Devon and Michael Allman, Trucks and Middleton carried the coffin out of the chapel.After the short procession from Snow’s Memorial Chapel to Rose Hill Cemetery – where more fans lined Riverside Drive - the gravesite ceremony commenced.As the 10-minute service concluded, Cher plucked a white rose from the flower blanket draping the coffin as she and several others paused at the fence surrounding the tombstones of Duane Allman and Oakley.Moments after the mourners departed, a freight train rumbled by a few hundred yards away — a powerful, final salute to Southern rock royalty.MORE ABOUT GREGG ALLMANRead and sign the online guestbookThe Allman Brothers Museum in Macon: The Big House still rocksFlashback: The Allman Brothers and Macon’s magical music history tourThe time Gregg Allman played a solo gig in Atlanta’s Music Midtown festivalFlashback: Gregg Allman overcame addictions and failure in his solo music careerFor updates on the death of Gregg Allman, follow the AJC Music Scene blog on Facebook or Twitter...

Obituary: PR man Bob Goff, promoter of Minnesotans and DFL politics, dies at 80 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Goff said in an interview with the Star Tribune last August. "This company has always done that. That part of it I'm very proud of."Robert Eugene Goff was born in 1936. He grew up in Staples, Minn., a small city about 30 miles west of Brainerd. He graduated St. Cloud State University in 1958 with a degree in social studies education and an emphasis on history. Goff went on to teach American history at Mounds View High School until 1963.As a teacher, Goff became active in DFL politics. He worked on numerous political campaigns, including John F. Kennedy's presidential run in 1960, many times helping with writing and placing advertisements for candidates across the state. After he left teaching, Goff became a senior aide to Gov. Karl Rolvaag, who served from 1963-67.In 1966, the day after Goff helped Nick Coleman be re-elected to the Minnesota Senate, Coleman asked Goff to form an advertising agency with him. Coleman and Goff Advertising was established that month. Goff described Coleman as the more talented out of the pair."It was always a great wonderment to me that somebody would ask that I would write something," Goff said.Nick Coleman's son, St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman, said Goff was one of the most "wickedly smart and brilliantly funny" people that he had ever met and that it was no surprise why his father had chosen to partner with him."I think in Bob he found a partner that understood the merger of his political life with the public relations side of it," the mayor said.Goff described the ad business in that era as the Wild West with "big bucks" being spent on advertising work done by out-of-town agencies. Goff said he and Coleman prided themselves on offering clients more affordable options.The agency was one of Minnesota's first public relations practices and served a range of clients, including Blue Cross Blue Shield, Polaris...

Good cooking takes root: Promoting healthy dietary change through connection to the African diaspora - Model D

Monday, March 06, 2017

The recipes and formulations in the Taste of Africa diet rely on replacing some of the dangerous staples of "soul food"—often high in sodium—with an array of traditional spices from the African diaspora, such as allspice, curry, and cilantro, that might feature flavors that children find strong. But the course doesn't propose radical or unsustainable lifestyle alterations, instead seeking to incorporate substitutions and gradual changes in habits."I came to this work while I was changing my own diet," says Bynum. "It's a gradual process.""I gave up pop a couple years ago," another participant puts in. "The other day, at a church gathering, they had a pitcher of what I thought was water, and it turned out to be Sprite. I took a sip by accident and was horrified by how sweet it was. I lost the taste for it."The class's youngest member does the honors with a spice preparation she helped measure Even small changes to diet and lifestyle can have massive long-term benefits, especially when they are imparted to younger generations. In the kitchen, and under careful supervision, the youngest class member, eight-years old, helps measure out the ingredients for a flavorful rice dish, a chickpea salad, and a Caribbean Coconut Red Beans dish. The kitchen buzzes with energy, women swapping stories, cooking tips, and flavorful aromas. Ben Washburn, MOSES treasurer and representative of Christ the King Catholic Church, helped facilitate the class. "We see education and experiences like this as a foundational way of building a strong congregation," Washburn says. "Just look at this place. Who wouldn't want to be a part of something like this?"It's true that collective food preparation and sharing meals falls increasingly by the wayside in the name of convenience, round-the-clock working hours, and fractured communities. So perhaps it's not only a culinary heritage that classes like this are hoping to reclaim, but one of togetherness, mutual support, and mealtimes as a positive and inter-generational experience. For more information about the series and other future nutrition education series, visit the Detroit Food Policy Council online.This article is part of Michigan Nightlight, a series of stories about the programs and people that positively impact the lives of Michigan kids. It is made possible with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Read more in the series here.All photos by the author.Let's block ads! a href...

Death and Funeral Notices for Dec. 27 - Tyler Morning Telegraph

Monday, January 09, 2017

Wednesday at First Baptist Church of Mineola. Beaty Funeral Home, Mineola.JOSHUA RYKER LIPSTEIN, 2 months, Henderson; Funeral ser­vice 2 p.m. Wednesday at Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home, Henderson.GAY STAPLES LOWERY, 70, Tyler; Memorial service 2 p.m. Wednesday at First Presbyterian Church. Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler.LONNIE RAY POOLE, 90, New London; Visitation 1-3 p.m. Wednesday at Cottle-Pearson Funeral Home. Funeral ser­vice 3 p.m. Wednesday at Cottle-Pearson Funeral Home, Overton.BETTY JEAN STEWART, 79, Tyler; Visitation 5-7 p.m. Tuesday at Stewart Family Funeral Home. Celebration of life service 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler.DAISY LOVE WELLS, 98, Tyler; Visitation 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday at Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home. Graveside service 2 p.m. Wednesday at Rose Hill Cemetery. Jackson’s Burks Walker Tippit Funeral Home.GEORGE FOWLER WILLIAMS, 88, Tyler; Visitation 4-6 p.m. Wednesday at Stewart Family Funeral Home, Tyler.