Clarksdale MS Funeral Homes

Clarksdale MS funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Drew R L Funeral Director , Heavenly Rest Cemetery , Oakridge Cemetery by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Clarksdale funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Century Funeral Home

506 Ashton Avenue
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 627-4182
Century Funeral Home funeral flowers

Coahoma County Memorial Gardens

Highway 6 East
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-2236
Coahoma County Memorial Gardens funeral flowers

Delta Burial Corporation

429 Yazoo Avenue
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-4161
Delta Burial Corporation funeral flowers

Drew R L Funeral Director

507 Ashton Avenue
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-5070
Drew R L Funeral Director funeral flowers

Espy Henry W Jr Funeral Director

506 Ashton Avenue
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 627-4182
Espy Henry W Jr Funeral Director funeral flowers

Heavenly Rest Cemetery

119 Martin Luther King B
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-4471
Heavenly Rest Cemetery funeral flowers

National Funeral Home

615 South State Street
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-2250
National Funeral Home funeral flowers

Nowell Mcneil Funeral Home

314 East 2nd Street
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-6218
Nowell Mcneil Funeral Home funeral flowers

Oakridge Cemetery

279 Sunflower Avenue
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 621-1015
Oakridge Cemetery funeral flowers

Royal Flower Shop

507 Ashton Avenue
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-5070
Royal Flower Shop funeral flowers

Stringer Redmon Funeral Home

119 Martin Luther King B
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-4471
Stringer Redmon Funeral Home funeral flowers

Woolf Funeral Home

761 McKinley Street
Clarksdale, MS 38614
(662) 624-2522
Woolf Funeral Home funeral flowers

Clarksdale MS Obituaries and Death Notices

Natural Resources - Oxford American

Monday, August 22, 2016

Mound Bayou sits twenty miles east of the Mississippi River, not too far south of the crossroads in Clarksdale. Old Highway 61 runs through the town, though it is not the kind of place a near-stranger would think to stop for a visit. The stately historic downtown burned for the second and last time in the 1940s, and all that remains of it today are a few dilapidated mansions, an old cotton gin, and the shell of the Bank of Mound Bayou. The new downtown, running along the highway, is mostly boarded up except for a post office, a barbershop, a handful of churches, and a funeral home. It doesn’t reflect the pride with which many of Mound Bayou’s residents still speak of their home’s former glory or the openness with which they greet visitors.“When I got here, Mound Bayou was jumping!” Hermon Johnson recalled. A trim, birdlike man with a quick smile and a bright Creole complexion from his half–Native American grandfather, Johnson moved to town from Louisiana in 1951. Those were the days when Mound Bayou was the only place in Mississippi where black people could swim in not just a concrete pool but an Olympic-size concrete pool. It had multiple cotton gins owned and operated by blacks, as well as a zoo that welcomed black visitors and two hospitals that served black patients. To Johnson it seemed like a dream, a world turned inside out, where people who looked like him ran the place. “When I learned that there was a town that was run by us, I said if I lived anywhere in the South, it would be somewhere where I could be a part of what’s going on.” This was the vision—a fantasy, really—of the community’s founder, Isaiah Thorton (I. T.) Montgomery, a man who was a slave under the unorthodox plantation system of Joseph Davis, the elder brother of Jefferson Davis. In a strange twist of history, sometime around 1825, Joseph is said to have met the British philosopher and industrialist Robert Owen on a stagecoach ride. Owen was a utopian socialist. When Davis returned home to the Davis Bend plantation just south of Vicksburg, he implemented some of Owen’s principles among his slave community. These offerings—sanitary living conditions, education, regular work hours, a jury of one’s peers—seem more inalienable than utopian today, but back then they were radical acts for a Mississippi slave-owner. They also gave Joseph’s trusted slave Ben Montgomery, I.T.’s father, enough leverage to educate his children, to run a mercantile operation selling to both blacks and whites, and to buy the plantation, the third largest in Mississippi, from the Davises after the Civil War. In 1887, after his father’s death and the backlash of Reconstruction, I. T. Montgomery made a deal with the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Railroad to settle the swamp wilderness where two bayous embraced a Native American burial mound. Some twenty years later, Montgomery’s experiment had grown into such a success that Booker T. Washington called Mound Bayou “a place where a Negro may get inspiration by seeing what other members of his race have accomplished.” During the darkest depths of the Jim Crow era, African Americans in Mound Bayou exercised the right to vote, walked through the front doors of restaurants, and established banks, hospitals, and insurance companies. It was a place where black planters owned land and produced such a coveted grade of cotton that all farmers in the area, black and white, vied to bring their crop to the town gin so it could be stamped with the MOUND BAYOU label. A place where in 1907 a train rolled into town bearing Theodore Roosevelt, who gave a ten-minute speech declaring Mound Bayou “the Jewel of the Delta.” A place were T. R. M. Howard, a black man, would become one of the most prominent entrepreneurs in the state of Mississippi in the 1950s. A place where, before Medicaid, the nation’s rural healthcare system was pioneered at Delta Health Center. It was also a refuge where black people were not disinclined to resort to arms to defend their property, their way of life, and their bodies. During the travesty of a trial for Emmett Till’s murderers in nearby Sumner, his mother, Mamie Till, stayed in Howard’s house under armed guard.Of course, leaving the town limits mea...

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Clarksdale News

Natural Resources - Oxford American

Monday, August 22, 2016

Mound Bayou sits twenty miles east of the Mississippi River, not too far south of the crossroads in Clarksdale. Old Highway 61 runs through the town, though it is not the kind of place a near-stranger would think to stop for a visit. The stately historic downtown burned for the second and last time in the 1940s, and all that remains of it today are a few dilapidated mansions, an old cotton gin, and the shell of the Bank of Mound Bayou. The new downtown, running along the highway, is mostly boarded up except for a post office, a barbershop, a handful of churches, and a funeral home. It doesn’t reflect the pride with which many of Mound Bayou’s residents still speak of their home’s former glory or the openness with which they greet visitors.“When I got here, Mound Bayou was jumping!” Hermon Johnson recalled. A trim, birdlike man with a quick smile and a bright Creole complexion from his half–Native American grandfather, Johnson moved to town from Louisiana in 1951. Those were the days when Mound Bayou was the only place in Mississippi where black people could swim in not just a concrete pool but an Olympic-size concrete pool. It had multiple cotton gins owned and operated by blacks, as well as a zoo that welcomed black visitors and two hospitals that served black patients. To Johnson it seemed like a dream, a world turned inside out, where people who looked like him ran the place. “When I learned that there was a town that was run by us, I said if I lived anywhere in the South, it would be somewhere where I could be a part of what’s going on.” This was the vision—a fantasy, really—of the community’s founder, Isaiah Thorton (I. T.) Montgomery, a man who was a slave under the unorthodox plantation system of Joseph Davis, the elder brother of Jefferson Davis. In a strange twist of history, sometime around 1825, Joseph is said to have met the British philosopher and industrialist Robert Owen on a stagecoach ride. Owen was a utopian socialist. When Davis returned home to the Davis Bend plantation just south of Vicksburg, he implemented some of Owen’s principles among his slave community. These offerings—sanitary living conditions, education, regular work hours, a jury of one’s peers—seem more inalienable than utopian today, but back then they were radical acts for a Mississippi slave-owner. They also gave Joseph’s trusted slave Ben Montgomery, I.T.’s father, enough leverage to educate his children, to run a mercantile operation selling to both blacks and whites, and to buy the plantation, the third largest in Mississippi, from the Davises after the Civil War. In 1887, after his father’s death and the backlash of Reconstruction, I. T. Montgomery made a deal with the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Railroad to settle the swamp wilderness where two bayous embraced a Native American burial mound. Some twenty years later, Montgomery’s experiment had grown into such a success that Booker T. Washington called Mound Bayou “a place where a Negro may get inspiration by seeing what other members of his race have accomplished.” During the darkest depths of the Jim Crow era, African Americans in Mound Bayou exercised the right to vote, walked through the front doors of restaurants, and established banks, hospitals, and insurance companies. It was a place where black planters owned land and produced such a coveted grade of cotton that all farmers in the area, black and white, vied to bring their crop to the town gin so it could be stamped with the MOUND BAYOU label. A place where in 1907 a train rolled into town bearing Theodore Roosevelt, who gave a ten-minute speech declaring Mound Bayou “the Jewel of the Delta.” A place were T. R. M. Howard, a black man, would become one of the most prominent entrepreneurs in the state of Mississippi in the 1950s. A place where, before Medicaid, the nation’s rural healthcare system was pioneered at Delta Health Center. It was also a refuge where black people were not disinclined to resort to arms to defend their property, their way of life, and their bodies. During the travesty of a trial for Emmett Till’s murderers in nearby Sumner, his mother, Mamie Till, stayed in Howard’s house under armed guard.Of course, leaving the town limits mea...