Rolling Fork MS Funeral Homes

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Glenwood Funeral Home

607 South Fourth Street
Rolling Fork, MS 39159
(662) 873-2811
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Walkers Funeral Home

99 North First Street
Rolling Fork, MS 39159
(662) 873-4005
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Rolling Fork MS Obituaries and Death Notices

Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

That is just one of the oddities of Nitta Yuma, a Delta community near the banks of Deer Creek in Sharkey County, 40 miles north of Rolling Fork and 35 miles south of Leland.Its story is like many others throughout Mississippi. Once a booming cotton community with a population approaching 600, Nitta Yuma is now home to about 20 souls who wouldn’t consider living elsewhere.But itty bitty Nitta Yuma also is unique. It had electricity before Vicksburg or most cities in the United States.SEE ALSO: 17 weirdly named Mississippi townsA Sept. 23, 1896, story in the Memphis Commercial Appeal carried the headline “Nitta Yuma Is Up To Date.”The story said Nitta Yuma was “entitled to distinction as the most remarkable town on earth, in point of enterprise and metropolitan progress.”It went on to say, “Nitta Yuma’s single street is illuminated by electricity” thanks to the “enterprise and liberality of Henry Phelps, the proprietor of one of the stores.” It described Phelps as an “accomplished electrician.”SEE ALSO: Town of Rodney retains mystical beauty - and 13 residentsFamily members whose roots are 200 years deep in this fertile soil want to share Nitta Yuma with the world, and they have plenty to look at — including nine buildings constructed before the Civil War.“A lot of people preserve their home place, the house they grew up in,” says 60-year-old Henry Vick Phelps III, who grew up on this property and and still lives here, as does his sister, Carolyn May, and his 28-year-old son, Vick. “But we went a little further and kept the other buildings, too.”Phelps credits his grandparents, Henry and Dorothy Phelps, for having the good sense to let the structures be.“We’d like to have a coffee shop, ...

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Mississippi doll collector buried dolls as a child in play funerals - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

That is just one of the oddities of Nitta Yuma, a Delta community near the banks of Deer Creek in Sharkey County, 40 miles north of Rolling Fork and 35 miles south of Leland.Its story is like many others throughout Mississippi. Once a booming cotton community with a population approaching 600, Nitta Yuma is now home to about 20 souls who wouldn’t consider living elsewhere.But itty bitty Nitta Yuma also is unique. It had electricity before Vicksburg or most cities in the United States.SEE ALSO: 17 weirdly named Mississippi townsA Sept. 23, 1896, story in the Memphis Commercial Appeal carried the headline “Nitta Yuma Is Up To Date.”The story said Nitta Yuma was “entitled to distinction as the most remarkable town on earth, in point of enterprise and metropolitan progress.”It went on to say, “Nitta Yuma’s single street is illuminated by electricity” thanks to the “enterprise and liberality of Henry Phelps, the proprietor of one of the stores.” It described Phelps as an “accomplished electrician.”SEE ALSO: Town of Rodney retains mystical beauty - and 13 residentsFamily members whose roots are 200 years deep in this fertile soil want to share Nitta Yuma with the world, and they have plenty to look at — including nine buildings constructed before the Civil War.“A lot of people preserve their home place, the house they grew up in,” says 60-year-old Henry Vick Phelps III, who grew up on this property and and still lives here, as does his sister, Carolyn May, and his 28-year-old son, Vick. “But we went a little further and kept the other buildings, too.”Phelps credits his grandparents, Henry and Dorothy Phelps, for having the good sense to let the structures be.“We’d like to have a coffee shop, ...