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Twin Oaks Memorial Gardens and Funeral Home

290 Goodman Road East
Walls, MS 38671
(662) 349-9720
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Walls MS Obituaries and Death Notices

Three funeral homes to merge into one business in Pigeon - Huron Daily Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Dutch Kettle building and preparing it for remodel work. Booms Construction of Bad Axe was hired to take on the project.“The only things that are being used are the four external walls,” Childs said, adding a new roof will also be installed. “Everything else is being replaced. There is not a single part of the building inside that will be reused.”The building — roughly 8,800 square feet — will feature two showing rooms, of which each can hold up to 100 people.“The building will be capable of holding two funerals at a time,” Childs said.The building will have a larger lounge for people to bring in beverages and light food during visitations as well as up-to-date technology accommodations for funeral showings.“I’m going through the planning process right now working with the architect and waiting on the approval of zoning,” he said. “I had to apply for a special use permit to have the building zoned as a funeral home.”A vote is scheduled for June 19 and after the vote goes through, he can apply for a building permit. But he can’t do that until all of the zoning issues are worked out.Looking toward the future, Childs said his current Caseville funeral home will be sold to party that is looking to turn it into a restaurant that could open next spring.

Crabby Floyd: A hard worker with a quick wit - The Laker/Lutz News

Saturday, June 10, 2017

He loved to tell old stories,” Carollo said.He also was very helpful.In fact, when Carollo was getting ready to open his business, DeForest pitched in to help paint the walls.Friends honored DeForest in posts in an electronic guestbook created by Loyless Funeral Home. They praised DeForest’s work ethic, his devotion to family and his coaching.One post also mentions his contribution to providing “tasty memories” for thousands of families.Besides his wife, Lorraine, DeForest is survived by his son, Floyd R.; his daughter, Candace; his mother, Elba; his brother, Rick and his wife, Loretta; nephews, a great niece and other family members and friends.Ortiz said DeForest is the kind of man who deserved to be remembered.“There are people out there that do things every day, and they don’t go out looking for credit, and they don’t go looking for accolades. That’s just them. That’s the kind of guy that Floyd was,” Ortiz said.“I’m going to miss him terribly. I already miss seeing him,” Ortiz said.Memorial service for Floyd DeForest7 p.m., March 5 at Loyless Funeral Home, 5310 Land O’ Lakes Blvd.The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Floyd DeForest’s memory to Gulfside HospicePublished March 4, 2015Share this:Like this:LikeLoading...

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Old Belgian Church cemetery. It was then that they realized how far into disrepair the long empty church had fallen.The roof was sagging and leaking badly. The plaster lining the church walls had begun to peel away, and its ceiling was close to collapse. Pigeons, mice and bees had made a wreck of the interior.meta itemprop="width" c...

Clifford Thornton

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Wisconsin on March 22, 2017. Clifford was born May 24, 1939 in Waukegan and had been a lifelong resident of Waukegan and Gurnee for most of his life except for a 15 year period when he lived in Walls, Mississippi. He had served in the US Air force, had been active in the Waukegan Lions Club, Waukegan Moose Lodge #706, was a member of Immaculate Conception Church, was an avid fisherman and loved to travel. He was a retired Sheet Metal Mechanic for Midwest Furnace Co., in Waukegan.Survivors include his son Ed (Christine) Thornton of Horicon, Wisconsin, one daughter Annette (Walter) Gorczowski of Homer Glen, IL, one sister Pat Passer of Richmond, Texas and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife Phyllis in 2002 and one brother Guy Thornton in 2012.Friends may visit with the family from 10am Monday, March 27, 2017 until time of service at Warren Funeral Home, 1475 North Cemetery Road, Gurnee. Funeral service will take place at 11am with entombment to follow at Warren Cemetery with military honors.Donations may be made in his memory to Agnesian Hospice Foundation, 430 East Division St., Fon du Lac, Wisconsin 54935...

Winners announced in Mississippi-Louisiana AP Competition - Idaho Statesman

Monday, April 03, 2017

Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "Faces of the Flood: Crosby Victims Return to Houses"; Second, Courtland Wells, The Vicksburg Post, "Air Show"; Third, Matt Williamson, Enterprise-Journal, "Outside the Walls."Portrait/Personality: First, Matt Williamson, Enterprise-Journal, "A March in the Sun"; Second, Courtland Wells, The Vicksburg Post, "Secret Santa"; Third, Nicole Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "I Can Beat You."Photo Sports Action: First, Courtland Wells, The Vicksburg Post, "The MVP"; Second, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "Ryan Olenek"; Third, Chuck Barnes, Enterprise-Journal, "Parklane Falls to MRA."Photo Sports Features: First, Nicole Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "Love of the Game"; Second, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "Sugar Rush"; Third, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "At the End of the Day."Multimedia Package: First, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "The Home Front: Local View of World War II"; Second, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "Black Friday Guide"; Third, Kevinisha Walker and Chris Heller, The Daily Comet, "Relatives of The Massacre Victim Gather in Memory."Video: First, Chris Heller, The Daily Comet, "TARC Bell Choir Plays Houma's Main Library"; Second, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "Shrimpers See Good Shrimp, Bad Prices in Opening Week of Season"; Third, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "Main Stage Lounge Orlando Benefit Night."Winners in Division II newspapers:Breaking News: First, The News-Star, "Region deluged"; Second, Guilbeau Glenn, The Daily Advertiser, "LSU Fires Les Miles"; Third, Caleb Bedillion and William Moore, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Shumpert Grand Jury."General News: First, Emily Fontenot, The American Press, "Trump Country"; Second, Jacob Batte and Maki Somosot, The Courier, "Gun Control"; Third, Zack Orsborn, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Mississippi Buffering."Features: First, Megan Wyatt, The Daily Advertiser, "Second Chances"; Second, Kevinisha Walker, The Courier, "A Last Run"; Third, Kristin Askelson, The Daily Advertiser, "It's Hard to Beat Cajuns Baseball Fans."Business: First, Haskel Burns, The Hattiesburg American, "Working to Buck Financial Trends"; Second, Dennis Seid, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Hancock Closing"; Third, Derek Russell, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Pure Imagination."Continuing Coverage: First, Crystal Stevenson, The American Press, "Trial of Ex-Priest"; Second, The Daily Advertiser, "Acadiana Flooding"; Third, Caleb Bedillion and William Moore, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Shumpert Shooting Coverage."Investigative/Public Service: First, Michaela Morris and William Moore, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Opioid Series"; Second, Maki Somosot and Bridget Mire, The Courier, "Stuck in Jail"; Third, Megan Wyatt, The Daily Advertiser, "Red Cross Fails Flooding Victims."Breaking Sports: First, Glenn Guilbeau, The Daily Advertiser, "LSU to Host Gators, then Play Second Straight at Florida"; Second, Jason Munz, The Hattiesburg American, "Monken Moving On"; Third, Sean Isabella, The News-Star, "Tech Names NSU's Brooke Stoehr as New Women's Hoops Coach."Sports Enterprise/Feature: First, Sean Isabella, The News-Star, "The Fobbs Playbook: A Guide to Revival"; Second, The Hattiesburg American, "100 Years of Southern Miss Football"; Third, Kelly McElroy, The Courier, "Local man in running to grace front of national magazine."Editorials: First, Erin Kosnac, The Hattiesburg American; Sec...

Mount Zion Baptist Church in Orange place for support, love - Washington Times

Monday, April 03, 2017

It still does.”Crawford’s downstairs office is lined with old desktop computers and self-help books on carpentry. The walls are stained with water damage from Hurricane Ike, whose 2008 devastation washed away historical documents and photos.His voice grows from a low rumble to an excited squeal as he describes the importance of education in the black community - starting at its origins.“What I find that can make us great as a people is education,” said Crawford, 70, who has been the head pastor at Mount Zion for 21 years. “The absence of knowledge is dangerous, and the echo in your brain created from ignorance brings upon violence when you are lost.”Mount Zion first sponsored a school for blacks in the church’s basement in 1873, led by teachers L.M. and S.M. Sublett, according to Orange historian Howard Williams’ book “Orange in Pictures.”Mount Zion’s success prompted the construction of St. Paul’s Missionary Baptist Church in 1884 on N. 14th St. as a church for Mount Zion’s members who lived farther away. Mt. Olive Baptist Church was built in 1910 and Mt. Sinai Baptist opened 10 years later. Today, Orange has 22 Baptist churches.“These churches set the standard for what the black community strives to be,” said Henry Lazby, 84, a former chairman of the deacon board at El Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, which formed in 1949. “They’ve tried to instill the right ideas of community and fellowship.”Mount Zion went through several renovations and moved twice, according to church documents. Classes continued despite pressure from the white community to move to make room for a dance hall, as well as a late 19th-century storm that “blew the church of its blocks”.Mount Zion’s current location was completed in 1926.In 1901, the Orange Colored School opened and at different times was housed at Mount Zion and Salem Methodist Church.One of the school’s four teachers was Emma Henderson Wallace, who went on to work at Orange’s first black high school, Moton, in 1916. She became principal in 1933, according to the Texas Historical Commission, and the school was renamed after her in 1946.Mount Zion “gave us a historical foundation of spirituality and education that allowed us to rise up as a people,” said Carol Luper, whose grandfather, the Rev. Luke Dunlap Jr., helped save the church during the Great Depression. “It was the first organized black institution that made a true mark on the community.”Luper, 67, is a third-generation college-educated black woman. Her mother, Mar...

Last Salute - Carroll Daily Times Herald

Monday, April 03, 2017

Coon Rapids-Bayard High School, Schumacher was there, front and center, wearing the Army uniform assigned to him in 1944.For years he used a pair of German binoculars he found during the war. His walls are adorned with photos and drawings and memories of the war. Schumacher, near the end of that 2013 interview, said he thinks often of the men who didn’t come home and marry their high school loves, who gave the years of life he enjoyed since World War II to their country.“It seemed like we were always on the attack,” Schumacher said. “When they say, ‘How many people did you see die?’… Well, they just disappeared.”...

David Rockefeller, Philanthropist and Head of Chase Manhattan, Dies at 101 - New York Times

Monday, March 27, 2017

His philanthropy was monumental, and so was his art collection, a museumlike repository of some 15,000 pieces, many of them masterpieces, some lining the walls of his offices 56 floors above the streets at Rockefeller Center, to which he repaired, robust and active, well into his 90s.In silent testimony to his power and reach was his Rolodex, a catalog of some 150,000 names of people he had met as a banker-statesman. It required a room of its own beside his office.Spread out below that corporate aerie was a city he loved and influenced mightily. He was instrumental in rallying the private sector to help resolve New York City’s fiscal crisis in the mid-1970s. As chairman of the Museum of Modern Art for many years — his mother had helped found it in 1929 — he led an effort to encourage corporations to buy and display art in their office buildings and to subsidize local museums. And as chairman of the New York City Partnership, a coalition of business executives, he fostered innovation in public schools and the development of thousands of apartments for lower-income and middle-class families.He was always aware of the mystique surrounding the Rockefeller name.“I have never found it a hindrance,” he once said with typical reserve. “Obviously, there are times when I’m aware that I’m treated differently. There’s no question that having financial resources, which, thanks to my parents, I learned to use with some restraint and discretion, is a big advantage.”An Ambassador for BusinessWith his powerful name and his zeal for foreign travel — he was still going to Europe into his late 90s — Mr. Rockefeller was a formidable marketing force. In the 1970s, his meetings with Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt, Leonid Brezhnev of the Soviet Union and Zhou Enlai of China helped Chase Manhattan become the first American bank with operations in those countries.“Few people in this country have met as many leaders as I have,” he said.Some faulted him for spending so much time abroad. He was accused of neglecting his responsibilities at Chase and failing to promote aggressive, visionary managers. Under his leadership, Chase fell far behind its rival Citibank, then the nation’s largest bank, in assets and earnings. There were years when Chase had the most troubled loan portfolio among major American banks.“In my judgment, he will not go down in history as a great banker,” John J. McCloy, a Rockefeller friend and himself a former Chase chairman, told The Associated Press in 1981. “He will go down as a real personality, as a distinguished and loyal member of the community.”Mr. Rockefeller’s forays into international politics also drew criticism, notably in 1979, when he and former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger persuaded President Jimmy Carter to admit the recently deposed shah of Iran into the United States for cancer treatment. The shah’s arrival in New York enraged revolutionary followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, provoking them to seize the United States Embassy in Iran and hold American diplomats hostage for more than a year. Mr. Rockefeller was also assailed...

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Three funeral homes to merge into one business in Pigeon - Huron Daily Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Dutch Kettle building and preparing it for remodel work. Booms Construction of Bad Axe was hired to take on the project.“The only things that are being used are the four external walls,” Childs said, adding a new roof will also be installed. “Everything else is being replaced. There is not a single part of the building inside that will be reused.”The building — roughly 8,800 square feet — will feature two showing rooms, of which each can hold up to 100 people.“The building will be capable of holding two funerals at a time,” Childs said.The building will have a larger lounge for people to bring in beverages and light food during visitations as well as up-to-date technology accommodations for funeral showings.“I’m going through the planning process right now working with the architect and waiting on the approval of zoning,” he said. “I had to apply for a special use permit to have the building zoned as a funeral home.”A vote is scheduled for June 19 and after the vote goes through, he can apply for a building permit. But he can’t do that until all of the zoning issues are worked out.Looking toward the future, Childs said his current Caseville funeral home will be sold to party that is looking to turn it into a restaurant that could open next spring.

Crabby Floyd: A hard worker with a quick wit - The Laker/Lutz News

Saturday, June 10, 2017

He loved to tell old stories,” Carollo said.He also was very helpful.In fact, when Carollo was getting ready to open his business, DeForest pitched in to help paint the walls.Friends honored DeForest in posts in an electronic guestbook created by Loyless Funeral Home. They praised DeForest’s work ethic, his devotion to family and his coaching.One post also mentions his contribution to providing “tasty memories” for thousands of families.Besides his wife, Lorraine, DeForest is survived by his son, Floyd R.; his daughter, Candace; his mother, Elba; his brother, Rick and his wife, Loretta; nephews, a great niece and other family members and friends.Ortiz said DeForest is the kind of man who deserved to be remembered.“There are people out there that do things every day, and they don’t go out looking for credit, and they don’t go looking for accolades. That’s just them. That’s the kind of guy that Floyd was,” Ortiz said.“I’m going to miss him terribly. I already miss seeing him,” Ortiz said.Memorial service for Floyd DeForest7 p.m., March 5 at Loyless Funeral Home, 5310 Land O’ Lakes Blvd.The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Floyd DeForest’s memory to Gulfside HospicePublished March 4, 2015Share this:Like this:LikeLoading...

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Old Belgian Church cemetery. It was then that they realized how far into disrepair the long empty church had fallen.The roof was sagging and leaking badly. The plaster lining the church walls had begun to peel away, and its ceiling was close to collapse. Pigeons, mice and bees had made a wreck of the interior.meta itemprop="width" c...

Clifford Thornton

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Wisconsin on March 22, 2017. Clifford was born May 24, 1939 in Waukegan and had been a lifelong resident of Waukegan and Gurnee for most of his life except for a 15 year period when he lived in Walls, Mississippi. He had served in the US Air force, had been active in the Waukegan Lions Club, Waukegan Moose Lodge #706, was a member of Immaculate Conception Church, was an avid fisherman and loved to travel. He was a retired Sheet Metal Mechanic for Midwest Furnace Co., in Waukegan.Survivors include his son Ed (Christine) Thornton of Horicon, Wisconsin, one daughter Annette (Walter) Gorczowski of Homer Glen, IL, one sister Pat Passer of Richmond, Texas and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife Phyllis in 2002 and one brother Guy Thornton in 2012.Friends may visit with the family from 10am Monday, March 27, 2017 until time of service at Warren Funeral Home, 1475 North Cemetery Road, Gurnee. Funeral service will take place at 11am with entombment to follow at Warren Cemetery with military honors.Donations may be made in his memory to Agnesian Hospice Foundation, 430 East Division St., Fon du Lac, Wisconsin 54935...

Winners announced in Mississippi-Louisiana AP Competition - Idaho Statesman

Monday, April 03, 2017

Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "Faces of the Flood: Crosby Victims Return to Houses"; Second, Courtland Wells, The Vicksburg Post, "Air Show"; Third, Matt Williamson, Enterprise-Journal, "Outside the Walls."Portrait/Personality: First, Matt Williamson, Enterprise-Journal, "A March in the Sun"; Second, Courtland Wells, The Vicksburg Post, "Secret Santa"; Third, Nicole Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "I Can Beat You."Photo Sports Action: First, Courtland Wells, The Vicksburg Post, "The MVP"; Second, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "Ryan Olenek"; Third, Chuck Barnes, Enterprise-Journal, "Parklane Falls to MRA."Photo Sports Features: First, Nicole Hester, The Natchez Democrat, "Love of the Game"; Second, Bruce Newman, The Oxford Eagle, "Sugar Rush"; Third, Ernest Bowker, The Vicksburg Post, "At the End of the Day."Multimedia Package: First, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "The Home Front: Local View of World War II"; Second, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "Black Friday Guide"; Third, Kevinisha Walker and Chris Heller, The Daily Comet, "Relatives of The Massacre Victim Gather in Memory."Video: First, Chris Heller, The Daily Comet, "TARC Bell Choir Plays Houma's Main Library"; Second, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "Shrimpers See Good Shrimp, Bad Prices in Opening Week of Season"; Third, Ashlee Hill, The Daily Comet, "Main Stage Lounge Orlando Benefit Night."Winners in Division II newspapers:Breaking News: First, The News-Star, "Region deluged"; Second, Guilbeau Glenn, The Daily Advertiser, "LSU Fires Les Miles"; Third, Caleb Bedillion and William Moore, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Shumpert Grand Jury."General News: First, Emily Fontenot, The American Press, "Trump Country"; Second, Jacob Batte and Maki Somosot, The Courier, "Gun Control"; Third, Zack Orsborn, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Mississippi Buffering."Features: First, Megan Wyatt, The Daily Advertiser, "Second Chances"; Second, Kevinisha Walker, The Courier, "A Last Run"; Third, Kristin Askelson, The Daily Advertiser, "It's Hard to Beat Cajuns Baseball Fans."Business: First, Haskel Burns, The Hattiesburg American, "Working to Buck Financial Trends"; Second, Dennis Seid, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Hancock Closing"; Third, Derek Russell, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Pure Imagination."Continuing Coverage: First, Crystal Stevenson, The American Press, "Trial of Ex-Priest"; Second, The Daily Advertiser, "Acadiana Flooding"; Third, Caleb Bedillion and William Moore, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Shumpert Shooting Coverage."Investigative/Public Service: First, Michaela Morris and William Moore, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, "Opioid Series"; Second, Maki Somosot and Bridget Mire, The Courier, "Stuck in Jail"; Third, Megan Wyatt, The Daily Advertiser, "Red Cross Fails Flooding Victims."Breaking Sports: First, Glenn Guilbeau, The Daily Advertiser, "LSU to Host Gators, then Play Second Straight at Florida"; Second, Jason Munz, The Hattiesburg American, "Monken Moving On"; Third, Sean Isabella, The News-Star, "Tech Names NSU's Brooke Stoehr as New Women's Hoops Coach."Sports Enterprise/Feature: First, Sean Isabella, The News-Star, "The Fobbs Playbook: A Guide to Revival"; Second, The Hattiesburg American, "100 Years of Southern Miss Football"; Third, Kelly McElroy, The Courier, "Local man in running to grace front of national magazine."Editorials: First, Erin Kosnac, The Hattiesburg American; Sec...

Mount Zion Baptist Church in Orange place for support, love - Washington Times

Monday, April 03, 2017

It still does.”Crawford’s downstairs office is lined with old desktop computers and self-help books on carpentry. The walls are stained with water damage from Hurricane Ike, whose 2008 devastation washed away historical documents and photos.His voice grows from a low rumble to an excited squeal as he describes the importance of education in the black community - starting at its origins.“What I find that can make us great as a people is education,” said Crawford, 70, who has been the head pastor at Mount Zion for 21 years. “The absence of knowledge is dangerous, and the echo in your brain created from ignorance brings upon violence when you are lost.”Mount Zion first sponsored a school for blacks in the church’s basement in 1873, led by teachers L.M. and S.M. Sublett, according to Orange historian Howard Williams’ book “Orange in Pictures.”Mount Zion’s success prompted the construction of St. Paul’s Missionary Baptist Church in 1884 on N. 14th St. as a church for Mount Zion’s members who lived farther away. Mt. Olive Baptist Church was built in 1910 and Mt. Sinai Baptist opened 10 years later. Today, Orange has 22 Baptist churches.“These churches set the standard for what the black community strives to be,” said Henry Lazby, 84, a former chairman of the deacon board at El Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, which formed in 1949. “They’ve tried to instill the right ideas of community and fellowship.”Mount Zion went through several renovations and moved twice, according to church documents. Classes continued despite pressure from the white community to move to make room for a dance hall, as well as a late 19th-century storm that “blew the church of its blocks”.Mount Zion’s current location was completed in 1926.In 1901, the Orange Colored School opened and at different times was housed at Mount Zion and Salem Methodist Church.One of the school’s four teachers was Emma Henderson Wallace, who went on to work at Orange’s first black high school, Moton, in 1916. She became principal in 1933, according to the Texas Historical Commission, and the school was renamed after her in 1946.Mount Zion “gave us a historical foundation of spirituality and education that allowed us to rise up as a people,” said Carol Luper, whose grandfather, the Rev. Luke Dunlap Jr., helped save the church during the Great Depression. “It was the first organized black institution that made a true mark on the community.”Luper, 67, is a third-generation college-educated black woman. Her mother, Mar...

Last Salute - Carroll Daily Times Herald

Monday, April 03, 2017

Coon Rapids-Bayard High School, Schumacher was there, front and center, wearing the Army uniform assigned to him in 1944.For years he used a pair of German binoculars he found during the war. His walls are adorned with photos and drawings and memories of the war. Schumacher, near the end of that 2013 interview, said he thinks often of the men who didn’t come home and marry their high school loves, who gave the years of life he enjoyed since World War II to their country.“It seemed like we were always on the attack,” Schumacher said. “When they say, ‘How many people did you see die?’… Well, they just disappeared.”...

David Rockefeller, Philanthropist and Head of Chase Manhattan, Dies at 101 - New York Times

Monday, March 27, 2017

His philanthropy was monumental, and so was his art collection, a museumlike repository of some 15,000 pieces, many of them masterpieces, some lining the walls of his offices 56 floors above the streets at Rockefeller Center, to which he repaired, robust and active, well into his 90s.In silent testimony to his power and reach was his Rolodex, a catalog of some 150,000 names of people he had met as a banker-statesman. It required a room of its own beside his office.Spread out below that corporate aerie was a city he loved and influenced mightily. He was instrumental in rallying the private sector to help resolve New York City’s fiscal crisis in the mid-1970s. As chairman of the Museum of Modern Art for many years — his mother had helped found it in 1929 — he led an effort to encourage corporations to buy and display art in their office buildings and to subsidize local museums. And as chairman of the New York City Partnership, a coalition of business executives, he fostered innovation in public schools and the development of thousands of apartments for lower-income and middle-class families.He was always aware of the mystique surrounding the Rockefeller name.“I have never found it a hindrance,” he once said with typical reserve. “Obviously, there are times when I’m aware that I’m treated differently. There’s no question that having financial resources, which, thanks to my parents, I learned to use with some restraint and discretion, is a big advantage.”An Ambassador for BusinessWith his powerful name and his zeal for foreign travel — he was still going to Europe into his late 90s — Mr. Rockefeller was a formidable marketing force. In the 1970s, his meetings with Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt, Leonid Brezhnev of the Soviet Union and Zhou Enlai of China helped Chase Manhattan become the first American bank with operations in those countries.“Few people in this country have met as many leaders as I have,” he said.Some faulted him for spending so much time abroad. He was accused of neglecting his responsibilities at Chase and failing to promote aggressive, visionary managers. Under his leadership, Chase fell far behind its rival Citibank, then the nation’s largest bank, in assets and earnings. There were years when Chase had the most troubled loan portfolio among major American banks.“In my judgment, he will not go down in history as a great banker,” John J. McCloy, a Rockefeller friend and himself a former Chase chairman, told The Associated Press in 1981. “He will go down as a real personality, as a distinguished and loyal member of the community.”Mr. Rockefeller’s forays into international politics also drew criticism, notably in 1979, when he and former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger persuaded President Jimmy Carter to admit the recently deposed shah of Iran into the United States for cancer treatment. The shah’s arrival in New York enraged revolutionary followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, provoking them to seize the United States Embassy in Iran and hold American diplomats hostage for more than a year. Mr. Rockefeller was also assailed...