Yazoo City MS Funeral Homes

Yazoo City MS funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Randle and Hays Memorial Chapels Inc , Shaffer and Collins by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Yazoo City funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Gregory Funeral Home

111 North Main Street
Yazoo City, MS 39194
(662) 746-3614
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Lindsey Family Memorial Funeral Home

203 East Fourth Street
Yazoo City, MS 39194
(662) 746-5315
Lindsey Family Memorial Funeral Home funeral flowers

Mortimer and Roberson Funeral Home

184 Bus Station Road
Yazoo City, MS 39194
(662) 746-1900
Mortimer and Roberson Funeral Home funeral flowers

Randle and Hays Memorial Chapels Inc

605 East Seventh Street
Yazoo City, MS 39194
(662) 746-5412
Randle and Hays Memorial Chapels Inc funeral flowers

Shaffer and Collins

247 West Sixth Street
Yazoo City, MS 39194
(662) 746-3985
Shaffer and Collins funeral flowers

Stricklin King Funeral Home

718 Calhoun Avenue
Yazoo City, MS 39194
(662) 746-1154
Stricklin King Funeral Home funeral flowers

Yazoo City MS Obituaries and Death Notices

Obituary: David Maxwell Miller - Plant City Observer

Monday, February 27, 2017

David Maxwell Miller, 87, of Plant City, died Feb. 5, 2017, at Lakeland Regional Health. He was born June 30, 1929, in Yazoo City, Mississippi, to Max and Maynie Miller. He grew up in Benton, Mississippi, where he graduated from Anding High School in 1947. He married his first wife, Catherine, and began farming. He later worked at Mississippi Chemical for 10 years, and then at CF Industries for 31 years with assignments in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Tampa and Bartow. He retired in 1998. His professional success was accompanied by a remarkable commitment to Plant City’s welfare. His service and generosity to his community improved the quality of life for everyone and will leave a positive imprint for many years to come. He served on several boards and committees with an expertise in fundraising and civic projects, including First Presbyterian Church of Plant City, the Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce, Plant City Rotary Club, Greater Tampa YMCA, South Florida Baptist Hospital Foundation, Hillsborough Community College and the Florida Strawberry Festival. He was a man of God, serving as deacon and el...

Longtime Ledger Sports Editor Cecil Darby dies - Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Columbus High.”Central lost 14-13.“It was just like I was there again,” Howard said. “He got it right. Just like I remembered it.”In 1969, Howard coached a Yazoo City team that won the Mississippi state championship.“He called me up to do a story and I remember he was so easy to talk to,” Howard said. “We ended up at Hardaway the next year. You could always trust him to get it right.”Darby, the son of Cecil Albert Darby Sr. and Jewel Owen Darby, worked in the Ledger for 36 years. He was a 1942 Columbus High School graduate, he briefly attended the University of Florida.He spent nearly three years in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II, mostly in the Pacific.After his retirement from the newspaper, Darby was honored for his work many times.He was inducted into the Chattahoochee Valley Sports Hall of Fame. Darby went into the South Atlantic League Hall of Fame in 1995 in a class that included pitcher Bob Gibson, catcher Al Lopez and the legendary Enos Slaughter.He kept meticulous records and in 2006 donated much of what he had accumulated to the Columbus State University archives. The collection included extensive material on Columbus minor league baseball teams dating back to the late 1800s.He has boxscores, rosters, photographs and scrapbooks of the Columbus Cardinals, Columbus Foxes, Columbus Astros, Columbus Yankees, Columbus RedStixx, Columbus Mudcats and most recently the Columbus Catfish.“I can remember when we went to Golden Park to see the Columbus Cardinals,” Winn said. “The men in our family read the sports pages. And I am convinced one of the reasons they went to the ballpark was because of his coverage.”In the 1980s, Ledger-Enquirer columnist Guerry Clegg was a young sports writer who covered minor league baseball as part of his duties.“As much as he had on paper — and he had a lot — he had more than twice that much in his head,” Clegg said. “If you needed to know something about minor league baseball, the first call you made was to Cecil. Why would you call anyone else?’When the Columbus RedStixx replaced the Columbus Mudcats and Double-A ball gave way to Single-A ball in the 1990s, Darby, long retired, could be found at Golden Park most nights.“He loved baseball,” Clegg said. “There would be nights there were 50 people at the park. You could bet, Cecil was one of those 50.”His material also included extensive information on the Columbus College athletic programs in the earlier years. Ragsdale was the first baseball coach at Colu...

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Obituary: David Maxwell Miller - Plant City Observer

Monday, February 27, 2017

David Maxwell Miller, 87, of Plant City, died Feb. 5, 2017, at Lakeland Regional Health. He was born June 30, 1929, in Yazoo City, Mississippi, to Max and Maynie Miller. He grew up in Benton, Mississippi, where he graduated from Anding High School in 1947. He married his first wife, Catherine, and began farming. He later worked at Mississippi Chemical for 10 years, and then at CF Industries for 31 years with assignments in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Tampa and Bartow. He retired in 1998. His professional success was accompanied by a remarkable commitment to Plant City’s welfare. His service and generosity to his community improved the quality of life for everyone and will leave a positive imprint for many years to come. He served on several boards and committees with an expertise in fundraising and civic projects, including First Presbyterian Church of Plant City, the Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce, Plant City Rotary Club, Greater Tampa YMCA, South Florida Baptist Hospital Foundation, Hillsborough Community College and the Florida Strawberry Festival. He was a man of God, serving as deacon and el...

Longtime Ledger Sports Editor Cecil Darby dies - Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Columbus High.”Central lost 14-13.“It was just like I was there again,” Howard said. “He got it right. Just like I remembered it.”In 1969, Howard coached a Yazoo City team that won the Mississippi state championship.“He called me up to do a story and I remember he was so easy to talk to,” Howard said. “We ended up at Hardaway the next year. You could always trust him to get it right.”Darby, the son of Cecil Albert Darby Sr. and Jewel Owen Darby, worked in the Ledger for 36 years. He was a 1942 Columbus High School graduate, he briefly attended the University of Florida.He spent nearly three years in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II, mostly in the Pacific.After his retirement from the newspaper, Darby was honored for his work many times.He was inducted into the Chattahoochee Valley Sports Hall of Fame. Darby went into the South Atlantic League Hall of Fame in 1995 in a class that included pitcher Bob Gibson, catcher Al Lopez and the legendary Enos Slaughter.He kept meticulous records and in 2006 donated much of what he had accumulated to the Columbus State University archives. The collection included extensive material on Columbus minor league baseball teams dating back to the late 1800s.He has boxscores, rosters, photographs and scrapbooks of the Columbus Cardinals, Columbus Foxes, Columbus Astros, Columbus Yankees, Columbus RedStixx, Columbus Mudcats and most recently the Columbus Catfish.“I can remember when we went to Golden Park to see the Columbus Cardinals,” Winn said. “The men in our family read the sports pages. And I am convinced one of the reasons they went to the ballpark was because of his coverage.”In the 1980s, Ledger-Enquirer columnist Guerry Clegg was a young sports writer who covered minor league baseball as part of his duties.“As much as he had on paper — and he had a lot — he had more than twice that much in his head,” Clegg said. “If you needed to know something about minor league baseball, the first call you made was to Cecil. Why would you call anyone else?’When the Columbus RedStixx replaced the Columbus Mudcats and Double-A ball gave way to Single-A ball in the 1990s, Darby, long retired, could be found at Golden Park most nights.“He loved baseball,” Clegg said. “There would be nights there were 50 people at the park. You could bet, Cecil was one of those 50.”His material also included extensive information on the Columbus College athletic programs in the earlier years. Ragsdale was the first baseball coach at Colu...