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Alberding Wilson Funeral Home

512 North Harvard Avenue
Harvard, NE 68944
(402) 462-5169
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Harvard NE Obituaries and Death Notices

Frederick B. Lacey, Who Prosecuted Corruption in New Jersey, Dies at 96 - New York Times

Monday, May 01, 2017

Carter administration, but he withdrew after critics complained that as a judge he had been predisposed toward the prosecution.Among those critics was the Harvard law professor Alan M. Dershowitz, who called Judge Lacey “extraordinarily competent” but added, “He has no sense of fair-mindedness.”Judge Lacey was named that same year to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which considers government eavesdropping applications.As a prosecutor Mr. Lacey was best known for battling mob bosses, among them Angelo DeCarlo, who was known as Gyp, and Ruggiero Boiardo, who was known as Richie the Boot.“What was only speculation when I last was here is now established,” he said on returning to the prosecutor’s office in 1969. “There is such a phenomenon as organized crime. Call it the Mafia, call it Cosa Nostra, call it Organized Crime, it exists.”Mr. Lacey fought to release hundreds of pages of transcripts of F.B.I. wiretaps to demonstrate the mob’s reach. (In one, Mr. DeCarlo was overheard urging support for Mr. Addonizio’s political career, saying, “He’ll give us the city.”)“Organized crime is, in the vernacular, taking us over,” Mr. Lacey warned.The Times wrote that the tapes “surpassed the disclosures made in 1963 before a Senate committee by Joseph M. Valachi, the deserter from the Mafia,” and that by corralling the bosses and detailing the mob’s superstructure, Mr. Lacey and his team had succeeded in outlining “the most complete network of crime and official corruption that has yet to be brought to trial in an American courtroom.”As a prosecutor Mr. Lacey was notably evenhanded when he searched for talent. Among the last cases he handled in private practice before becoming the federal prosecutor was the bribery trial of an oil company executive whom he was defending as part of a legal dream team of Edward Bennett Williams and Simon H. Rifkind.The executive was convicted, thanks to a young Justice Department prosecutor, Herbert J. Stern. Mr. Lacey’s first appointment as a United States attorney was to hire Mr. Stern as his chief assistant.Correction: April 12, 2017An earlier version of this obituary misspelled the surname of a former mayor of Jersey City who was prosecuted by Mr. Lacey. He was Thomas J. Whel...

Obituary: Joan Bishop, 82, of Somerville - Patch.com

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Somerville at 10:00 am. Relatives and friends invited. Calling hours Friday 4-8 pm. Interment will be held at Holy Cross Cemetery in Malden. Prior to her retirement Joan was a Financial Assistant for Harvard University. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Joan’s memory to St. Ann’s Church (memo: for the benefit of the Senior Center) c/o St. Catherine Rectory, 179 Summer St. Somerville, MA 02143. Late member Retired Men’s Club Cribbage Group of Arlington.Obituary and photo courtesy of Doherty Funeral Service Get free real-time news alerts from the Somerville Patch.

Howard Chasanow, judge on Maryland Court of Appeals, dies at 79 - Washington Post

Saturday, April 08, 2017

He graduated from the University of Maryland in 1958 and from its law school in 1961. He received a master’s degree from Harvard Law School in 1962. After Air Force service, he was an assistant prosecutor in Prince George’s County and a lawyer in private practice.His first marriage, to Marilyn Madden, ended in divorce. Survivors include his wife of 34 years, Deborah Koss Chasanow, senior U.S. District Court judge for the District of Maryland, of College Park; a daughter from his first marriage, Andrea Gentle of London; three sisters, former Post food critic Phyllis Richman of Washington, Myrna Chasanow of Cheverly, Md., and Ruth Heitin of Alexandria; and two grandsons.Around the Prince George’s County Courthouse, Judge Chasanow liked to recount “the comma that saved a life.”A condemned man, the judge said, was en route to his execution when a telegram from the governor arrived. It read: “Pardon, impossible to execute.” He was spared.Only later did the warden discover there had been a typographical error. This was what had been intended: “Pardon impossible to execute.” The inadvertent comma had saved the condemned man’s life and the state had repealed the death penalty before the warden discovered the error.In May 1979, Judge Chasanow faced a similar situation in a death penalty case, declaring in court that his decision had to be based on “grammar and legislative intent,” and he said he stayed up most of the night poring through old grammar books.The defendant, William Joseph Parker, a transient Prince George’s County fireman, had been convicted of murder and rape. The relevant Maryland law allowed the death penalty for a conviction of murder while committing “rape or a sexual offense in the first degree.”Parker was convicted of murder and second-degree rape. Because there was no comma in the statute after the word rape, Judge Chasanow concluded the death penalty was not applicable.He sentenced the man to life in prison.Read more Washington Post obituaries...

Dr. Sandra K. Willsie - Parsons Sun

Saturday, April 08, 2017

A National Institutes of Health-funded career academic awardee, a Macy Institute scholar and an invited faculty member on health care leadership at Harvard University, Sandra was very involved in academic medicine. She served as professor of medicine, interim chair of medicine and docent at the University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine and as provost, dean, vice dean and department chair at Kansas City University of Osteopathic Medicine.Sandra earned a master’s degree in bioethics and health policy focusing on research ethics from Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. She made countless scholarly presentations and published regularly with active participation as a board member of the American College of Chest Physicians. Sandra once said “when you can’t breathe, nothing much else matters,” and in her persuasive way, she was instrumental in the creation and financial recruitment for the establishment of the Chest Foundation, for which she later served as a board member. Today the Chest Foundation continues providing grants around the world to fight respiratory diseases.Sandra made eight pro bono trips to provide physicians in Honduras, Panama, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic the latest research updates on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease research. Sandra was honored to serve as president of Women Executives in Science and Healthcare and as board president of the American Heart Association’s Midwest Affiliate (greater Kansas City area), where her primary focus was on fundraising for the Go Red for Women Initiative and the launching of the Circle of Red Initiative.In the corporate world Sandra served as medical director, principal investigator and a system-wide chair responsible for global harmonization of medical safety practices and policies. At the time of her diagnosis, Dr. Willsie had been volunteering for over 30 years at the KC CARE Clinic in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, and was a committee member of the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on respiratory and anesthesiology devices.As stated by one close friend, “Sandra was an amazing woman, selfless leader, gifted doctor, generous healer and respected scholar who made a difference in the lives of so many. She inspired a generation of new...

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Frederick B. Lacey, Who Prosecuted Corruption in New Jersey, Dies at 96 - New York Times

Monday, May 01, 2017

Carter administration, but he withdrew after critics complained that as a judge he had been predisposed toward the prosecution.Among those critics was the Harvard law professor Alan M. Dershowitz, who called Judge Lacey “extraordinarily competent” but added, “He has no sense of fair-mindedness.”Judge Lacey was named that same year to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which considers government eavesdropping applications.As a prosecutor Mr. Lacey was best known for battling mob bosses, among them Angelo DeCarlo, who was known as Gyp, and Ruggiero Boiardo, who was known as Richie the Boot.“What was only speculation when I last was here is now established,” he said on returning to the prosecutor’s office in 1969. “There is such a phenomenon as organized crime. Call it the Mafia, call it Cosa Nostra, call it Organized Crime, it exists.”Mr. Lacey fought to release hundreds of pages of transcripts of F.B.I. wiretaps to demonstrate the mob’s reach. (In one, Mr. DeCarlo was overheard urging support for Mr. Addonizio’s political career, saying, “He’ll give us the city.”)“Organized crime is, in the vernacular, taking us over,” Mr. Lacey warned.The Times wrote that the tapes “surpassed the disclosures made in 1963 before a Senate committee by Joseph M. Valachi, the deserter from the Mafia,” and that by corralling the bosses and detailing the mob’s superstructure, Mr. Lacey and his team had succeeded in outlining “the most complete network of crime and official corruption that has yet to be brought to trial in an American courtroom.”As a prosecutor Mr. Lacey was notably evenhanded when he searched for talent. Among the last cases he handled in private practice before becoming the federal prosecutor was the bribery trial of an oil company executive whom he was defending as part of a legal dream team of Edward Bennett Williams and Simon H. Rifkind.The executive was convicted, thanks to a young Justice Department prosecutor, Herbert J. Stern. Mr. Lacey’s first appointment as a United States attorney was to hire Mr. Stern as his chief assistant.Correction: April 12, 2017An earlier version of this obituary misspelled the surname of a former mayor of Jersey City who was prosecuted by Mr. Lacey. He was Thomas J. Whel...

Obituary: Joan Bishop, 82, of Somerville - Patch.com

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Somerville at 10:00 am. Relatives and friends invited. Calling hours Friday 4-8 pm. Interment will be held at Holy Cross Cemetery in Malden. Prior to her retirement Joan was a Financial Assistant for Harvard University. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Joan’s memory to St. Ann’s Church (memo: for the benefit of the Senior Center) c/o St. Catherine Rectory, 179 Summer St. Somerville, MA 02143. Late member Retired Men’s Club Cribbage Group of Arlington.Obituary and photo courtesy of Doherty Funeral Service Get free real-time news alerts from the Somerville Patch.

Howard Chasanow, judge on Maryland Court of Appeals, dies at 79 - Washington Post

Saturday, April 08, 2017

He graduated from the University of Maryland in 1958 and from its law school in 1961. He received a master’s degree from Harvard Law School in 1962. After Air Force service, he was an assistant prosecutor in Prince George’s County and a lawyer in private practice.His first marriage, to Marilyn Madden, ended in divorce. Survivors include his wife of 34 years, Deborah Koss Chasanow, senior U.S. District Court judge for the District of Maryland, of College Park; a daughter from his first marriage, Andrea Gentle of London; three sisters, former Post food critic Phyllis Richman of Washington, Myrna Chasanow of Cheverly, Md., and Ruth Heitin of Alexandria; and two grandsons.Around the Prince George’s County Courthouse, Judge Chasanow liked to recount “the comma that saved a life.”A condemned man, the judge said, was en route to his execution when a telegram from the governor arrived. It read: “Pardon, impossible to execute.” He was spared.Only later did the warden discover there had been a typographical error. This was what had been intended: “Pardon impossible to execute.” The inadvertent comma had saved the condemned man’s life and the state had repealed the death penalty before the warden discovered the error.In May 1979, Judge Chasanow faced a similar situation in a death penalty case, declaring in court that his decision had to be based on “grammar and legislative intent,” and he said he stayed up most of the night poring through old grammar books.The defendant, William Joseph Parker, a transient Prince George’s County fireman, had been convicted of murder and rape. The relevant Maryland law allowed the death penalty for a conviction of murder while committing “rape or a sexual offense in the first degree.”Parker was convicted of murder and second-degree rape. Because there was no comma in the statute after the word rape, Judge Chasanow concluded the death penalty was not applicable.He sentenced the man to life in prison.Read more Washington Post obituaries...

Dr. Sandra K. Willsie - Parsons Sun

Saturday, April 08, 2017

A National Institutes of Health-funded career academic awardee, a Macy Institute scholar and an invited faculty member on health care leadership at Harvard University, Sandra was very involved in academic medicine. She served as professor of medicine, interim chair of medicine and docent at the University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine and as provost, dean, vice dean and department chair at Kansas City University of Osteopathic Medicine.Sandra earned a master’s degree in bioethics and health policy focusing on research ethics from Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. She made countless scholarly presentations and published regularly with active participation as a board member of the American College of Chest Physicians. Sandra once said “when you can’t breathe, nothing much else matters,” and in her persuasive way, she was instrumental in the creation and financial recruitment for the establishment of the Chest Foundation, for which she later served as a board member. Today the Chest Foundation continues providing grants around the world to fight respiratory diseases.Sandra made eight pro bono trips to provide physicians in Honduras, Panama, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic the latest research updates on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease research. Sandra was honored to serve as president of Women Executives in Science and Healthcare and as board president of the American Heart Association’s Midwest Affiliate (greater Kansas City area), where her primary focus was on fundraising for the Go Red for Women Initiative and the launching of the Circle of Red Initiative.In the corporate world Sandra served as medical director, principal investigator and a system-wide chair responsible for global harmonization of medical safety practices and policies. At the time of her diagnosis, Dr. Willsie had been volunteering for over 30 years at the KC CARE Clinic in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, and was a committee member of the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on respiratory and anesthesiology devices.As stated by one close friend, “Sandra was an amazing woman, selfless leader, gifted doctor, generous healer and respected scholar who made a difference in the lives of so many. She inspired a generation of new...