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Wherry BROS Mortuary

207 Nemaha Street
Humboldt, NE 68376
(402) 862-2915
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Humboldt NE Obituaries and Death Notices

Ronald Tebbs

Monday, June 26, 2017

I teach until their eyes get glassy, then I go into my funny stories”. Ron earned his Bachelor’s degree and Master’s in Education from Whittier College and a Master’s in Marine Biology from Humboldt State University in Trinidad, California. Ron’s life will be celebrated on Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Luginbuel Funeral Chapel, 332 North Scraper, Vinita, Oklahoma. Burial follows at McLaughlin Cemetery in Cleora, Oklahoma, near the Gran Tara entrance.

Obituaries for March 26, 2017 - State Gazette

Monday, April 03, 2017

Billy L. Wilson, 67, of Fort Hudson Road, Dyersburg, TN, passed away on Friday, March 24, 2017 at the Tennessee State Veterans Home in Humboldt.??He was born on November 19, 1949 in Dyer County to the late James Robert (Dick) Wilson and the late Geraldine McDaniel Wilson. Billy received a higher technical education from Newbern VoTech and continued a career in industrial maintenance throughout his lifetime. First, working at Hoover Universal for 10 years and then later retired from Quebecor World after 20 years of employment. Billy was a U.S. Army Veteran serving in the Vietnam War, where he received the Bronze Star Medal. He was also a former member of Lenox Baptist Church and West Dyersburg Church of Christ.??Services will be at 3 p.m. today in the chapel of Dyersburg Funeral Home with Mr. Rick Crawford officiating. ??The family will receive visitors from 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. today at Dyersburg Funeral Home.??Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Linda S. Wilson; a son, Shane Wilson and wife, Jennifer; a daughter, Angela Jenkins and husband, Neal; eight grandchildren, April Porchia Wilson, Derek Heath Wilson, Tyler Shane Wilson, Destiny Christina Harris, Lane Oneal Harris, Chelsea Dawn Smith, Madison Paige Wilson and Hannah Jenkins; a brother, James "Dooner" Wilson and wife, Lisa; four great-grandchildren, twins Ryleigh and Kyleigh Lowery, Emmie Wilson and Rylee Wilson; and several nieces and nephews.??Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a sister, Nina Jo Wilson Golloday.??Honorary pallbearers will be April Wilson, Derek Wilson, Tyler Wilson, Destiny Harris, Lane Harris, Chelsea Smith, Madison Wilson and Hannah Jenkins.Online condolences for the Wilson Family may be sent to our website at www.dyersburgfuneralhome.net.

Dewey leaves imprint on art, family and community - Chanute Tribune

Monday, January 30, 2017

When he put backgrounds on his animal paintings, it brought them to life even more,” he said.Several of his paintings hang in the Works of Art gallery in Humboldt.“It looked like they were alive,” Foster said. “It’s not something you can teach an artist, he either has it or he doesn’t.”Foster wasn’t shy about praising Dewey’s artistic talent, but said the artist himself was often bashful about compliments on his work.Foster also admired Dewey as a person for his loyalty and work ethic.“You could depend on him,” Foster said. “He wasn’t afraid to ask for help and not afraid to give help.”He also appreciated Dewey’s sense of humor that matched his own, and his ability to take a joke as well as give it out.“I’ll miss his sense of humor and I’ll miss his friendship,” Foster said. “It’s one of those friendships that you didn’t have to see someone every day or every week … we just started where we left off.” Good boss, tooJudy Hedden worked for Dewey for several years from the late 70s to the early 80s at The Paint Brush, his screen printing business in Chanute, which later changed its name to Silk Screen Graphics before Dewey started painting full time.Hedden was also a year behind Dewey in school. The company did a lot of metal printing including amplifier chassis and work for G.O. Churchill.Hedden said Dewey was very family-oriented.“His family was always in the shop,” she said. “Some of them worked there, some of were just hanging out after school.”Hedden said it didn’t matter how busy he was, he was there for his children if they needed something.He was also a good boss.“He was like a big brother,” Hedden said. “If he had stories, he told me, and if I had problems, I told him.”Hedden said she was treated as an equal and she learned a lot, which has allowed her to find her own success screen-printing T-Shirts.Dewey started painting more frequently around the time that Hedden started working for him. She said she loved to watch him paint.“I always wondered how he could make his hands move like that,” she said. “He could make that brush do anything.”Hedden said that Dewey will be missed by many people.“Anyone who has anything he’s ever painted should treasure it,” she said. “They’re so valuable to me.”Bruce Taggart works for the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks and was working in Humboldt in the late 70s when he heard about Dewey’s wildlife art.He remembers Dewey loving the outdoors, hunting and fishing.“It was just incredible what he did,” Taggart said.Taggart bought some pieces from Dewey and they struck up a friendship where they would spend a lot of time talking about the wildlife that Dewey painted. Dewey’s love for the outdoors spurred him to get the animals right in his paintings.“A lot of people get the proportions wrong,” Taggart said. By contrast, Dewey’s animals almost looked alive.“The best thing he did were Canada Geese, but he did some fantastic turkey paintings,” Taggart said.Taggart moved back to Hays in 1989 and lost touch with Dewey except for the occasional phone call, and was sad to hear about Dewey’s death.“He was a real great art talent and a super guy.”Some of Dewey’s pieces can be seen at the Works of Art Gallery, 103 S. 9th in Humboldt. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10 am to 5 pm and Saturday from 12 to 3 pm.  A visitation will be held at Countryside Funeral Home – Gibson Chapel in Chanute...

Bykerk, Loree Lynn (Gerdes), Ph.D. - Omaha World-Herald

Monday, December 12, 2016

Dennis Gerdes and his wife, Dorothy of Auburn, NE, Dave Gerdes and his wife, Karen of Springfield, NE; sisters-in-law: Virginia Gerdes and Iva Bolken of Auburn, NE; brother-in-law, Lloyd Volker of Humboldt, NE; many other nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. The family will receive friends Tuesday, Dec. 6th, 5pm to 8pm at the Bel Air Chapel. SERVICES Wednesday, Dec. 7th at 2pm at Morning Star Lutheran Church, 331 S. 85th Ave., followed by a reception in the church fellowship hall. Interment Thursday, Dec. 8th at 11am at St John's (Stone Church) Lutheran Church in rural Nemaha County, S.W. of Auburn, 63289 725th Road, followed by a reception at the Bykerk home, 72745 634th Ave. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials to the Loree Bykerk Scholarship Fund for UNO Political Science students at the University of Nebraska Foundation, 1010 Lincoln Mall, Suite 300, Lincoln, NE 68508. HEAFEY-HOFFMANN-DWORAK-CUTLER BEL AIR CHAPEL 12100 W. Center Rd. 402-391-3900 www.heafeyheafey.com...

Nevada's Ralph Whitworth, activist investor, dies at 60 - Reno Gazette Journal

Monday, October 03, 2016

Nevada, Reno graduate.A 2003 profile of Whitworth published in the RGJ reported that Whitworth and his family committed $1 million to fund a tutoring program aimed at helping high school students in Humboldt County prepare for college.According to information from the Ferraro Group, he also established the Ralph Whitworth Scholar Leader Scholarship Endowment at UNR, which benefits students in the College of Business scholar leader program. He also gave funds for the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center and other causes through the UNR Foundation.Whitworth was often asked to present his views before the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, New York Stock Exchange Board and Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and was a regular on cable news business programs, according to the Ferraro Group news release.In 2014, the Forbes Leadership Forum website ran a story with the headline, “Why Ralph Whitworth May Be America’s Best Board Member,” touting his tenure at Hewlett-Packard.In a 2003 interview with the Reno Gazette-Journal, he said his fondest memories of growing up in Winnemucca included working on hot rods with his friends, including Mitch Legarza, Mitch Woods, Jim Billingsley and Dennis Verner.“The people of Winnemucca played a defining role in establishing my values and work ethic,” he told the RGJ. “Winnemucca will always be my hometown.”Whitworth is survived by his wife, Fe, and children Amaya, Walker, Douglas and Ava. Services are pending.Read or Share this story: http://on.rgj.com/2dstq4U...

Once seen as recession-proof, the funeral industry is in a death spiral. Some owners are staving off the end by ... - Crain's New York Business

Monday, July 25, 2016

He has the neighborhood’s last funeral parlor north of the Williamsburg Bridge. One by one, his competitors closed: Blizinzki Funeral Home on Metropolitan Avenue, Abramo’s on Humboldt Avenue, Polakas on Berry Street, Matthew Ballas on Grand Street and others since the 1990s.A similar pattern has been playing out across the city. Over two decades, hundreds of funeral homes have shuttered, many of them multigeneration family businesses—neighborhood mainstays who could be counted on to remember old-timers’ nicknames or provide a steady presence to the grieving. Photo: Buck Ennis An urn is placed in a case with handles for pall bearers at Frank E. Campbell funeral chapel. “It’s unbelievable what’s happened,” said Robert Ruggiero, executive director of the Metropolitan Funeral Directors Association, a local trade group. When he took office in 1990, the organization’s directory listed 841 funeral homes. Last year, his mailing list was down to 473, a 44% drop.Ruggiero’s numbers reflect the city’s: Just 475 licensed funeral parlors were operating here in 2015, according to the state’s Department of Health.Funeral homes are no longer recession-proof. The new challenge for funeral directors is figuring out how to serve changing customer needs and still make money.The usual suspectsWhy is death a dying business? Observers cite the familiar and oft-blamed culprit of gentrification, which drives up real estate prices until a funeral home’s property is more valuable than its business. Some recent examples: the 2014 sales of Michael Cosgrove & Son funeral home (established 1912) in Sunset Park for $2.125 million and Dominic J. Cusimano Court Street Funeral Home (established 1946) in Cobble Hill for $4.55 million. Last year, Ray Smith Funeral Home in Prospect Heights sold for $2.35 million and Marion Daniels & Sons in Harlem for $3 million. Most were sold to developers and will become new residential and retail buildings. Photo: Buck Ennis Joe Aievoli installed fireplaces so Chinese funeral guests could burn offerings for their deceased relatives. “Funeral homes are good for redevelopment and mixed use,” said Aaron Warkov, a real estate broker with Cushman & Wakefield who took an interest in funeral homes about three years ago. He calls about a dozen funeral directors periodically to test the waters. “They’re waiting to see if their nephews want to take over the business, or their grandson,” he said. He’s sold two funera...

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Humboldt News

Ronald Tebbs

Monday, June 26, 2017

I teach until their eyes get glassy, then I go into my funny stories”. Ron earned his Bachelor’s degree and Master’s in Education from Whittier College and a Master’s in Marine Biology from Humboldt State University in Trinidad, California. Ron’s life will be celebrated on Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Luginbuel Funeral Chapel, 332 North Scraper, Vinita, Oklahoma. Burial follows at McLaughlin Cemetery in Cleora, Oklahoma, near the Gran Tara entrance.

Obituaries for March 26, 2017 - State Gazette

Monday, April 03, 2017

Billy L. Wilson, 67, of Fort Hudson Road, Dyersburg, TN, passed away on Friday, March 24, 2017 at the Tennessee State Veterans Home in Humboldt.??He was born on November 19, 1949 in Dyer County to the late James Robert (Dick) Wilson and the late Geraldine McDaniel Wilson. Billy received a higher technical education from Newbern VoTech and continued a career in industrial maintenance throughout his lifetime. First, working at Hoover Universal for 10 years and then later retired from Quebecor World after 20 years of employment. Billy was a U.S. Army Veteran serving in the Vietnam War, where he received the Bronze Star Medal. He was also a former member of Lenox Baptist Church and West Dyersburg Church of Christ.??Services will be at 3 p.m. today in the chapel of Dyersburg Funeral Home with Mr. Rick Crawford officiating. ??The family will receive visitors from 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. today at Dyersburg Funeral Home.??Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Linda S. Wilson; a son, Shane Wilson and wife, Jennifer; a daughter, Angela Jenkins and husband, Neal; eight grandchildren, April Porchia Wilson, Derek Heath Wilson, Tyler Shane Wilson, Destiny Christina Harris, Lane Oneal Harris, Chelsea Dawn Smith, Madison Paige Wilson and Hannah Jenkins; a brother, James "Dooner" Wilson and wife, Lisa; four great-grandchildren, twins Ryleigh and Kyleigh Lowery, Emmie Wilson and Rylee Wilson; and several nieces and nephews.??Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a sister, Nina Jo Wilson Golloday.??Honorary pallbearers will be April Wilson, Derek Wilson, Tyler Wilson, Destiny Harris, Lane Harris, Chelsea Smith, Madison Wilson and Hannah Jenkins.Online condolences for the Wilson Family may be sent to our website at www.dyersburgfuneralhome.net.

Dewey leaves imprint on art, family and community - Chanute Tribune

Monday, January 30, 2017

When he put backgrounds on his animal paintings, it brought them to life even more,” he said.Several of his paintings hang in the Works of Art gallery in Humboldt.“It looked like they were alive,” Foster said. “It’s not something you can teach an artist, he either has it or he doesn’t.”Foster wasn’t shy about praising Dewey’s artistic talent, but said the artist himself was often bashful about compliments on his work.Foster also admired Dewey as a person for his loyalty and work ethic.“You could depend on him,” Foster said. “He wasn’t afraid to ask for help and not afraid to give help.”He also appreciated Dewey’s sense of humor that matched his own, and his ability to take a joke as well as give it out.“I’ll miss his sense of humor and I’ll miss his friendship,” Foster said. “It’s one of those friendships that you didn’t have to see someone every day or every week … we just started where we left off.” Good boss, tooJudy Hedden worked for Dewey for several years from the late 70s to the early 80s at The Paint Brush, his screen printing business in Chanute, which later changed its name to Silk Screen Graphics before Dewey started painting full time.Hedden was also a year behind Dewey in school. The company did a lot of metal printing including amplifier chassis and work for G.O. Churchill.Hedden said Dewey was very family-oriented.“His family was always in the shop,” she said. “Some of them worked there, some of were just hanging out after school.”Hedden said it didn’t matter how busy he was, he was there for his children if they needed something.He was also a good boss.“He was like a big brother,” Hedden said. “If he had stories, he told me, and if I had problems, I told him.”Hedden said she was treated as an equal and she learned a lot, which has allowed her to find her own success screen-printing T-Shirts.Dewey started painting more frequently around the time that Hedden started working for him. She said she loved to watch him paint.“I always wondered how he could make his hands move like that,” she said. “He could make that brush do anything.”Hedden said that Dewey will be missed by many people.“Anyone who has anything he’s ever painted should treasure it,” she said. “They’re so valuable to me.”Bruce Taggart works for the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks and was working in Humboldt in the late 70s when he heard about Dewey’s wildlife art.He remembers Dewey loving the outdoors, hunting and fishing.“It was just incredible what he did,” Taggart said.Taggart bought some pieces from Dewey and they struck up a friendship where they would spend a lot of time talking about the wildlife that Dewey painted. Dewey’s love for the outdoors spurred him to get the animals right in his paintings.“A lot of people get the proportions wrong,” Taggart said. By contrast, Dewey’s animals almost looked alive.“The best thing he did were Canada Geese, but he did some fantastic turkey paintings,” Taggart said.Taggart moved back to Hays in 1989 and lost touch with Dewey except for the occasional phone call, and was sad to hear about Dewey’s death.“He was a real great art talent and a super guy.”Some of Dewey’s pieces can be seen at the Works of Art Gallery, 103 S. 9th in Humboldt. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10 am to 5 pm and Saturday from 12 to 3 pm.  A visitation will be held at Countryside Funeral Home – Gibson Chapel in Chanute...

Bykerk, Loree Lynn (Gerdes), Ph.D. - Omaha World-Herald

Monday, December 12, 2016

Dennis Gerdes and his wife, Dorothy of Auburn, NE, Dave Gerdes and his wife, Karen of Springfield, NE; sisters-in-law: Virginia Gerdes and Iva Bolken of Auburn, NE; brother-in-law, Lloyd Volker of Humboldt, NE; many other nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. The family will receive friends Tuesday, Dec. 6th, 5pm to 8pm at the Bel Air Chapel. SERVICES Wednesday, Dec. 7th at 2pm at Morning Star Lutheran Church, 331 S. 85th Ave., followed by a reception in the church fellowship hall. Interment Thursday, Dec. 8th at 11am at St John's (Stone Church) Lutheran Church in rural Nemaha County, S.W. of Auburn, 63289 725th Road, followed by a reception at the Bykerk home, 72745 634th Ave. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials to the Loree Bykerk Scholarship Fund for UNO Political Science students at the University of Nebraska Foundation, 1010 Lincoln Mall, Suite 300, Lincoln, NE 68508. HEAFEY-HOFFMANN-DWORAK-CUTLER BEL AIR CHAPEL 12100 W. Center Rd. 402-391-3900 www.heafeyheafey.com...

Nevada's Ralph Whitworth, activist investor, dies at 60 - Reno Gazette Journal

Monday, October 03, 2016

Nevada, Reno graduate.A 2003 profile of Whitworth published in the RGJ reported that Whitworth and his family committed $1 million to fund a tutoring program aimed at helping high school students in Humboldt County prepare for college.According to information from the Ferraro Group, he also established the Ralph Whitworth Scholar Leader Scholarship Endowment at UNR, which benefits students in the College of Business scholar leader program. He also gave funds for the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center and other causes through the UNR Foundation.Whitworth was often asked to present his views before the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, New York Stock Exchange Board and Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and was a regular on cable news business programs, according to the Ferraro Group news release.In 2014, the Forbes Leadership Forum website ran a story with the headline, “Why Ralph Whitworth May Be America’s Best Board Member,” touting his tenure at Hewlett-Packard.In a 2003 interview with the Reno Gazette-Journal, he said his fondest memories of growing up in Winnemucca included working on hot rods with his friends, including Mitch Legarza, Mitch Woods, Jim Billingsley and Dennis Verner.“The people of Winnemucca played a defining role in establishing my values and work ethic,” he told the RGJ. “Winnemucca will always be my hometown.”Whitworth is survived by his wife, Fe, and children Amaya, Walker, Douglas and Ava. Services are pending.Read or Share this story: http://on.rgj.com/2dstq4U...

Once seen as recession-proof, the funeral industry is in a death spiral. Some owners are staving off the end by ... - Crain's New York Business

Monday, July 25, 2016

He has the neighborhood’s last funeral parlor north of the Williamsburg Bridge. One by one, his competitors closed: Blizinzki Funeral Home on Metropolitan Avenue, Abramo’s on Humboldt Avenue, Polakas on Berry Street, Matthew Ballas on Grand Street and others since the 1990s.A similar pattern has been playing out across the city. Over two decades, hundreds of funeral homes have shuttered, many of them multigeneration family businesses—neighborhood mainstays who could be counted on to remember old-timers’ nicknames or provide a steady presence to the grieving. Photo: Buck Ennis An urn is placed in a case with handles for pall bearers at Frank E. Campbell funeral chapel. “It’s unbelievable what’s happened,” said Robert Ruggiero, executive director of the Metropolitan Funeral Directors Association, a local trade group. When he took office in 1990, the organization’s directory listed 841 funeral homes. Last year, his mailing list was down to 473, a 44% drop.Ruggiero’s numbers reflect the city’s: Just 475 licensed funeral parlors were operating here in 2015, according to the state’s Department of Health.Funeral homes are no longer recession-proof. The new challenge for funeral directors is figuring out how to serve changing customer needs and still make money.The usual suspectsWhy is death a dying business? Observers cite the familiar and oft-blamed culprit of gentrification, which drives up real estate prices until a funeral home’s property is more valuable than its business. Some recent examples: the 2014 sales of Michael Cosgrove & Son funeral home (established 1912) in Sunset Park for $2.125 million and Dominic J. Cusimano Court Street Funeral Home (established 1946) in Cobble Hill for $4.55 million. Last year, Ray Smith Funeral Home in Prospect Heights sold for $2.35 million and Marion Daniels & Sons in Harlem for $3 million. Most were sold to developers and will become new residential and retail buildings. Photo: Buck Ennis Joe Aievoli installed fireplaces so Chinese funeral guests could burn offerings for their deceased relatives. “Funeral homes are good for redevelopment and mixed use,” said Aaron Warkov, a real estate broker with Cushman & Wakefield who took an interest in funeral homes about three years ago. He calls about a dozen funeral directors periodically to test the waters. “They’re waiting to see if their nephews want to take over the business, or their grandson,” he said. He’s sold two funera...