Las Vegas NV Funeral Homes

Las Vegas NV funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about La Paloma Funeral Services , Palm Green Valley Mortuary and Cemetery , Paradise Memorial Gardens Trlr by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Las Vegas funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Affordable Cremation and Burial Service

2457 North Decatur Boulevard
Las Vegas, NV 89108
(702) 464-8560
Affordable Cremation and Burial Service funeral flowers

American Burial and Cremation

310 Foremaster Lane
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 384-7600
American Burial and Cremation funeral flowers

Angel Store

9326 West Sahara Avenue Suite 6
Las Vegas, NV 89117
(702) 562-4901
Angel Store funeral flowers

Bunkers Mortuary

925 Las Vegas Boulevard North
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 385-1441
Bunkers Mortuary funeral flowers

Cloud Nine

7341 West Charleston Boulevard
Las Vegas, NV 89117
(702) 804-1677
Cloud Nine funeral flowers

Davis Funeral Homes

2127 West Charleston Boulevard
Las Vegas, NV 89102
(702) 383-2900
Davis Funeral Homes funeral flowers

Desert Crematory

3027 Contract Avenue
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 477-3057
Desert Crematory funeral flowers

Hites Funeral Home

438 West Sunset Road
Las Vegas, NV 89011
(702) 568-1747
Hites Funeral Home funeral flowers

King David Memorial Chapel and Cemetery

2697 E Eldorado Ln
Las Vegas, NV 89120
(702) 464-8570
King David Memorial Chapel and Cemetery funeral flowers

La Paloma Funeral Services

5450 Stephanie St
Las Vegas, NV 89122
(702) 732-7070
La Paloma Funeral Services  funeral flowers

Nevada Funeral Service

2983 Fremont Street
Las Vegas, NV 89104
(702) 382-7378
Nevada Funeral Service funeral flowers

Palm Downtown Mortuary And Cemetery

1325 North Main Street
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 464-8300
Palm Downtown Mortuary And Cemetery funeral flowers

Palm Green Valley Mortuary and Cemetery

7600 South Eastern Avenue
Las Vegas, NV 89123
(702) 464-8500
Palm Green Valley Mortuary and Cemetery funeral flowers

Palm Memorial Design Center

7600 South Eastern Avenue
Las Vegas, NV 89123
(702) 464-8550
Palm Memorial Design Center funeral flowers

Palm Mortuaries Cemeteries Crematories

1325 North Main Street
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 464-8300
Palm Mortuaries Cemeteries Crematories funeral flowers

Palm Northwest Mortuary

6701 N Jones Blvd
Las Vegas, NV 89131
(702) 464-8460
Palm Northwest Mortuary funeral flowers

Palm South Jones Mortuary

1600 South Jones Blvd
Las Vegas, NV 89146
(702) 464-8420
Palm South Jones Mortuary funeral flowers

Paradise Memorial Gardens

6200 South Eastern Avenue
Las Vegas, NV 89119
(702) 736-6200
Paradise Memorial Gardens funeral flowers

Paradise Memorial Gardens Trlr

2425 East Patrick Lane
Las Vegas, NV 89120
(702) 891-0005
Paradise Memorial Gardens Trlr funeral flowers

Sonali

9326 West Sahara Avenue Suite 6
Las Vegas, NV 89117
(702) 562-4901
Sonali funeral flowers

Thomas and Jones Funeral Home

310 Foremaster Ln
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 384-7600
Thomas and Jones Funeral Home funeral flowers

Las Vegas NV Obituaries and Death Notices

Mourners pay respects to Tashii Brown, who died in police custody - Las Vegas Review-Journal

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Taser and placed in an unauthorized chokehold for more than a minute by Metropolitan Police Department officer Kenneth Lopera.Excited to celebrate Mother’s Day with her son, who had moved to the Las Vegas Valley earlier this year, Trinita Farmer was instead notified that her son’s life had been “needlessly taken while in police custody,” Andre Lagomarsino, the family’s attorney, said of Brown’s death.While reporters weren’t permitted at Saturday’s memorial service in Las Vegas, Lagomarsino related one of the touching moments at the service, held before a crowd of mourners at the Davis Funeral Home’s Rainbow Chapel. In the emotional two-minute reading, the family member spoke the tender words Brown had written to Farmer in a Mother’s Day card.A program for Saturday’s service also included his mother’s remembrance of Brown’s life.“He touched the hearts of anyone that would give him five minutes of their time,” she wrote.Call for reform Brown’s death and the use of the chokehold have prompted community outrage, a Strip demonstration and an NAACP petition banning the use of neck restraints by the Metropolitan Police Department. Lopera has been placed on paid administrative leave while Brown’s death is investigated, according to Metro Undersheriff Kevin McMahill.Led by NAACP Las Vegas president Roxann McCoy, the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union Las Vegas chapters have come together in...

DONALD E. KELLEY - Youngstown Vindicator

Monday, May 01, 2017

E. Kelley, 72, passed away Thursday morning, April 27, 2017, at his home. He was born April 8, 1945, in Youngstown, a son of Howard and Patricia (Shearer) Kelley. ?Don? worked for Caesar?s Palace in Las Vegas in the Engineering Department for 11 years before retiring. He had also worked as an HVAC technician, a cable installer, and was a certified motorcycle mechanic. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, having proudly served during the Vietnam War. During his service, he spent time on several Navy ships as well as being stationed in Panama, Puerto Rico, Okinawa, Japan and Turkey before being honorably discharged. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, riding motorcycles and flying kites. He also played the drums, coached soccer, enjoyed making cheesecake and he raised pigs. Don also had a love for Mill Creek Park, Kravits Deli, The Elms Ballroom, and Idora Park, and he enjoyed listening to John Lee Hooker, Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, and Janis Joplin. Don is survived by a son, Arian G. Kelley of Wilmington, N.C.; a daughter, Megan K. Small of Kannapolis, N.C.; three sisters, Margaret Brown of Florida, Winifred Kiersey of Toronto, Ohio, and Beth Parker of Kent; and two brothers, William Kelley of Mantua, a...

Bertha M. Sherman Watson - Rapid City Journal

Monday, May 01, 2017

Victoria (Hunter) Sherman, and was a member of the Oglala-Lakota Indian tribe. She grew up in South Dakota and graduated from high school there. She married Jack Watson in 1959 and they soon moved to Las Vegas where Bertha worked as a costume designer for the Desert Inn stage productions and also for television and movie productions. They eventually moved to Talihina where they operated a cattle ranch for a number of years. After that they lived in Ruidoso, NM, before returning to Checotah 5 years ago. Bertha and Jack were huge fans of the National Finals Rodeo and had personally attended the event for over 50 consecutive years and were PRCA Gold Card members. She was of the Catholic faith.Surviving are her husband, Jack Watson of Checotah; numerous nieces and nephews; and special friend, Jamie Berry. She was preceded in death by her parents and several siblings.Graveside services at 2 p.m. today at Oak Hill Cemetery in McAlester, with Tony Hodgson presiding. Get breaking news sent instantly to your inbox .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col{ margin-right: 20px; } .whatcounts-form-container .whatco...

Elgin woman remembered for lifelong passion for teaching - Chicago Daily Herald

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

October she was diagnosed with a terminal cancer of the abdominal lining."She was given four to six months to live," he said.Yet, she was able to go on one last family vacation to Las Vegas last month."We had a great time, a lot of great memories," Jerry Turnquist said. "That was one great positive thing for her during that final couple of months. I will miss her tremendously, but she left me some great memories and I have those to sustain me."Three weeks ago, Turnquist was moved to JourneyCare Hospice facility in Barrington, where she died surrounded by her family.She was preceded in death by her parents, Dorothy Spomer Larson and Gustaf Larson. She is survived by her sons, Dennis and Eric, both of Elgin, and brother Kenneth Larson of Aurora.Visitation is 3 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Laird Funeral Home, 310 S. State St., Elgin. A memorial service is 11 a.m. Monday at First Congregational Church, 256 E. Chicago St., Elgin, followed by light refreshments in the church's Fellowship Hall.Burial will be private at Bluff City Cemetery in Elgin. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the U-46 Foundation's Elementary School Library Fund or the Bethesda Lutheran Communities, which provides services and homes to people with developmental disabilities.#article_video {width:100%;margin:25px 0;max-width:576px;overflow:hidden;} ...

Don Rickles, Comedy's Equal Opportunity Offender, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Sinatra laughed so hard, he fell out of his seat.Mr. Rickles was soon being championed by Sinatra, Dean Martin and the other members of the show business circle known as the Rat Pack. Steady work in Las Vegas followed. But he was hardly an overnight success: He spent a decade in the comedy trenches before he broke through to a national audience.In 1965, he made the first of numerous appearances on “The Tonight Show,” treating Johnny Carson with his trademark disdain to the audience’s (and Carson’s) delight. He also became a regular on Dean Martin’s televised roasts, where no celebrity was safe from his onslaughts. (“What’s Bob Hope doing here? Is the war over?”)Mr. Rickles’s wife, who he said “likes to lie in bed, signaling ships with her jewelry,” was not immune to his attacks. Neither was his mother, Etta, whom he referred to as “the Jewish Patton.” But off the stage, he didn’t hesitate to express his gratitude to his mother for unflaggingly believing in his talent, even when he himself wasn’t so sure.“She had a tremendous drive,” he recalled in “Mr. Warmth.” “Drove me crazy. But she was like the driving force for me.”He shared an apartment with his mother and did not marry until he was almost 40. After marrying Barbara Sklar in 1965, he saw to it that his mother had the apartment next door. His wife survives him, as do a daughter, Mindy Mann, and two grandchildren. Mr. Rickles’s son, Lawrence, died in 2011.Donald Jay Rickles was born in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens on May 8, 1926, to Max Rickles, an insurance salesman, and the former Etta Feldman. During World War II, he honed his comedic skills while serving in the Navy. (“On the ship that I went over to the Philippines,” he told The New York Times in 2015, “out of 300 men I was the class comedian.”) After being discharged, he followed his father into the insurance business, but when he had trouble getting his customers to sign on the dotted line, decided to try acting.He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, an experience that he later said gave him a greater sense of himself. But he found it difficult to get acting jobs and turned to stand-up comedy.For a while, he pursued acting and comedy simultaneously. He did his stand-up act at Catskills resorts and in strip clubs, and his movie career got off to an auspicious start with a small part in the 1958 submarine drama “Run Silent, Run Deep,” starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. But the bulk of his film work in the 1960s was in low-budget beach movies: “Bikini Beach,” “Muscle Beach Party” and “Pajama Party,” all in 1964, and “Beach Blanket Bingo” in 1965.By that time, his comedy career had begun gathering momentum. Focusing less on prepared material and more on interaction with his audience, he had found his voice. He was not the first insult comedian — and in fact an earlier master of the comic insult, Jack E. Leonard, was known to complain that Mr. Rickles’s act was too similar to his — but he soon became far and away the most successful.Bookings in the late 1950s at the Slate Brothers nightclub in Hollywood and the lounge of the Sahara Hotel in Las Vegas spread the word. During his Slate Brothers engagement, Carl Reiner recalled in “Mr. Warmth,” the biggest names in show business felt that “if they hadn’t been insulted by Rickles, they weren’t with it.”His appearances insulting celebrities on the Dean Martin roasts and his sparring matches with Carson cemented Mr. Rickles’s reputation, but his unscripted brand of humor proved an uneasy fit for weekly television. A variety show in 1968 and a situation comedy in 1972, both called “The Don Rickles Show,” were short-lived, as was “Daddy Dearest,...

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Mourners pay respects to Tashii Brown, who died in police custody - Las Vegas Review-Journal

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Taser and placed in an unauthorized chokehold for more than a minute by Metropolitan Police Department officer Kenneth Lopera.Excited to celebrate Mother’s Day with her son, who had moved to the Las Vegas Valley earlier this year, Trinita Farmer was instead notified that her son’s life had been “needlessly taken while in police custody,” Andre Lagomarsino, the family’s attorney, said of Brown’s death.While reporters weren’t permitted at Saturday’s memorial service in Las Vegas, Lagomarsino related one of the touching moments at the service, held before a crowd of mourners at the Davis Funeral Home’s Rainbow Chapel. In the emotional two-minute reading, the family member spoke the tender words Brown had written to Farmer in a Mother’s Day card.A program for Saturday’s service also included his mother’s remembrance of Brown’s life.“He touched the hearts of anyone that would give him five minutes of their time,” she wrote.Call for reform Brown’s death and the use of the chokehold have prompted community outrage, a Strip demonstration and an NAACP petition banning the use of neck restraints by the Metropolitan Police Department. Lopera has been placed on paid administrative leave while Brown’s death is investigated, according to Metro Undersheriff Kevin McMahill.Led by NAACP Las Vegas president Roxann McCoy, the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union Las Vegas chapters have come together in...

DONALD E. KELLEY - Youngstown Vindicator

Monday, May 01, 2017

E. Kelley, 72, passed away Thursday morning, April 27, 2017, at his home. He was born April 8, 1945, in Youngstown, a son of Howard and Patricia (Shearer) Kelley. ?Don? worked for Caesar?s Palace in Las Vegas in the Engineering Department for 11 years before retiring. He had also worked as an HVAC technician, a cable installer, and was a certified motorcycle mechanic. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, having proudly served during the Vietnam War. During his service, he spent time on several Navy ships as well as being stationed in Panama, Puerto Rico, Okinawa, Japan and Turkey before being honorably discharged. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, riding motorcycles and flying kites. He also played the drums, coached soccer, enjoyed making cheesecake and he raised pigs. Don also had a love for Mill Creek Park, Kravits Deli, The Elms Ballroom, and Idora Park, and he enjoyed listening to John Lee Hooker, Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, and Janis Joplin. Don is survived by a son, Arian G. Kelley of Wilmington, N.C.; a daughter, Megan K. Small of Kannapolis, N.C.; three sisters, Margaret Brown of Florida, Winifred Kiersey of Toronto, Ohio, and Beth Parker of Kent; and two brothers, William Kelley of Mantua, a...

Bertha M. Sherman Watson - Rapid City Journal

Monday, May 01, 2017

Victoria (Hunter) Sherman, and was a member of the Oglala-Lakota Indian tribe. She grew up in South Dakota and graduated from high school there. She married Jack Watson in 1959 and they soon moved to Las Vegas where Bertha worked as a costume designer for the Desert Inn stage productions and also for television and movie productions. They eventually moved to Talihina where they operated a cattle ranch for a number of years. After that they lived in Ruidoso, NM, before returning to Checotah 5 years ago. Bertha and Jack were huge fans of the National Finals Rodeo and had personally attended the event for over 50 consecutive years and were PRCA Gold Card members. She was of the Catholic faith.Surviving are her husband, Jack Watson of Checotah; numerous nieces and nephews; and special friend, Jamie Berry. She was preceded in death by her parents and several siblings.Graveside services at 2 p.m. today at Oak Hill Cemetery in McAlester, with Tony Hodgson presiding. Get breaking news sent instantly to your inbox .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col{ margin-right: 20px; } .whatcounts-form-container .whatco...

Elgin woman remembered for lifelong passion for teaching - Chicago Daily Herald

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

October she was diagnosed with a terminal cancer of the abdominal lining."She was given four to six months to live," he said.Yet, she was able to go on one last family vacation to Las Vegas last month."We had a great time, a lot of great memories," Jerry Turnquist said. "That was one great positive thing for her during that final couple of months. I will miss her tremendously, but she left me some great memories and I have those to sustain me."Three weeks ago, Turnquist was moved to JourneyCare Hospice facility in Barrington, where she died surrounded by her family.She was preceded in death by her parents, Dorothy Spomer Larson and Gustaf Larson. She is survived by her sons, Dennis and Eric, both of Elgin, and brother Kenneth Larson of Aurora.Visitation is 3 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Laird Funeral Home, 310 S. State St., Elgin. A memorial service is 11 a.m. Monday at First Congregational Church, 256 E. Chicago St., Elgin, followed by light refreshments in the church's Fellowship Hall.Burial will be private at Bluff City Cemetery in Elgin. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the U-46 Foundation's Elementary School Library Fund or the Bethesda Lutheran Communities, which provides services and homes to people with developmental disabilities.#article_video {width:100%;margin:25px 0;max-width:576px;overflow:hidden;} ...

Don Rickles, Comedy's Equal Opportunity Offender, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Sinatra laughed so hard, he fell out of his seat.Mr. Rickles was soon being championed by Sinatra, Dean Martin and the other members of the show business circle known as the Rat Pack. Steady work in Las Vegas followed. But he was hardly an overnight success: He spent a decade in the comedy trenches before he broke through to a national audience.In 1965, he made the first of numerous appearances on “The Tonight Show,” treating Johnny Carson with his trademark disdain to the audience’s (and Carson’s) delight. He also became a regular on Dean Martin’s televised roasts, where no celebrity was safe from his onslaughts. (“What’s Bob Hope doing here? Is the war over?”)Mr. Rickles’s wife, who he said “likes to lie in bed, signaling ships with her jewelry,” was not immune to his attacks. Neither was his mother, Etta, whom he referred to as “the Jewish Patton.” But off the stage, he didn’t hesitate to express his gratitude to his mother for unflaggingly believing in his talent, even when he himself wasn’t so sure.“She had a tremendous drive,” he recalled in “Mr. Warmth.” “Drove me crazy. But she was like the driving force for me.”He shared an apartment with his mother and did not marry until he was almost 40. After marrying Barbara Sklar in 1965, he saw to it that his mother had the apartment next door. His wife survives him, as do a daughter, Mindy Mann, and two grandchildren. Mr. Rickles’s son, Lawrence, died in 2011.Donald Jay Rickles was born in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens on May 8, 1926, to Max Rickles, an insurance salesman, and the former Etta Feldman. During World War II, he honed his comedic skills while serving in the Navy. (“On the ship that I went over to the Philippines,” he told The New York Times in 2015, “out of 300 men I was the class comedian.”) After being discharged, he followed his father into the insurance business, but when he had trouble getting his customers to sign on the dotted line, decided to try acting.He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, an experience that he later said gave him a greater sense of himself. But he found it difficult to get acting jobs and turned to stand-up comedy.For a while, he pursued acting and comedy simultaneously. He did his stand-up act at Catskills resorts and in strip clubs, and his movie career got off to an auspicious start with a small part in the 1958 submarine drama “Run Silent, Run Deep,” starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. But the bulk of his film work in the 1960s was in low-budget beach movies: “Bikini Beach,” “Muscle Beach Party” and “Pajama Party,” all in 1964, and “Beach Blanket Bingo” in 1965.By that time, his comedy career had begun gathering momentum. Focusing less on prepared material and more on interaction with his audience, he had found his voice. He was not the first insult comedian — and in fact an earlier master of the comic insult, Jack E. Leonard, was known to complain that Mr. Rickles’s act was too similar to his — but he soon became far and away the most successful.Bookings in the late 1950s at the Slate Brothers nightclub in Hollywood and the lounge of the Sahara Hotel in Las Vegas spread the word. During his Slate Brothers engagement, Carl Reiner recalled in “Mr. Warmth,” the biggest names in show business felt that “if they hadn’t been insulted by Rickles, they weren’t with it.”His appearances insulting celebrities on the Dean Martin roasts and his sparring matches with Carson cemented Mr. Rickles’s reputation, but his unscripted brand of humor proved an uneasy fit for weekly television. A variety show in 1968 and a situation comedy in 1972, both called “The Don Rickles Show,” were short-lived, as was “Daddy Dearest,...