Audubon NJ Funeral Homes

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DuBois Wallace

700 South White Horse Pike
Audubon, NJ 08106
(856) 547-2700
DuBois Wallace funeral flowers

Foster's Funeral Home

250 South White Horse Pike
Audubon, NJ 08106
(856) 547-1195
Foster's Funeral Home funeral flowers

Henry James C Funeral Director

152 West Atlantic Avenue
Audubon, NJ 08106
(856) 547-3875
Henry James C Funeral Director funeral flowers

Audubon NJ Obituaries and Death Notices

What killed owl at Forest Lawn? Maybe not what you think. - The ... - Buffalo News

Monday, March 06, 2017

Tom Kerr, a naturalist with the Buffalo Audubon Society, said poisonings by birds living in urban areas can be fairly common."Even if rat poison isn't used in the immediate area, hawks and owls often leave a place like Forest Lawn Cemetery to hunt," Kerr said. "It is very hard to prevent this, especially when we don't know where the poison is being used.  The best thing to do is keep educating people on the subject and help them find alternatives to using poison that can unintentionally hurt predators."That's another reason Tripi recommends property owners concerned about rodent problems call the county health department or seek a licensed professional exterminator rather than taking matters into their own hands.It was unclear what type of poison, or its origin, led to the owl's death in this case.Forest Lawn's President Joseph P. Dispenza said the cemetery uses no poisons or pesticides on its grounds.Gorman confesses she's become "obsessed with owls" and has been "doing a lot of research" since making the unfortunate discovery last month."I hope this story moves people to find another way to deal with the rodent problem, like using live traps or glue traps," Gorman said. "Once a rat is poisoned, it becomes disoriented and slow and this is when the owl finds it as easy prey. Even if the first rat it eats doesn’t kill the owl, the poisons bio-accumulate until it reaches a fatal dose."...

DEC: rat poison likely killed Forest Lawn owl - Story - WKBW - WKBW-TV

Monday, March 06, 2017

That's why this situation was weird because one day it was there and the next day it dropped dead, seemingly without a cause," Tom Kerr said.  Kerr is a naturalist with Buffalo Audubon Society.Forest Lawn President Joe Dispenza said the incident was "terribly unfortunate".  The poison didn't come from the cemetery, as Dispenza explained they don't use animal or rat poison on the property."As a unique natural habitat in the city of Buffalo with many wildlife species, we are looking to our partners and the DEC to help provide direction to our community to help prevent any contamination of our parks and cemetery," Dispenza said.Kerr said it's likely the owl left the cemetery to hunt where it came across, and ate, a poisoned rat.  It is a common problem for birds of prey in cities.  Poisoned rats and rodents don't die immediately and can become easy targets for owls and hawks."It just looks like an easy meal to them," Kerr explained.  "A sick, dying rat is easy for them to grab and pick up and carry back and eat.  So it's really, really hard to figure out where it came from."In a statement, the Erie County Department of Health, which does use poison as one method to control the rodent population, said "every step necessary to prevent secondary poisoning of a non-targeted animal is taken".The DEC is currently performing tests to confirm the preliminary results, but those will not be available for several weeks.

Brit Bennett, Nickolas Butler among visiting authors this season - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Monday, January 23, 2017

Michael Benabib)Elinor Lipman, 2 p.m. Feb. 19. Comic novelist Lipman will talk about her new book, "One Turpentine Lane" (HMH), in conversation with "Lake Effect" voice Bonnie North at the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center, 1111 E. Brown Deer Road, Bayside. Tickets ($26) include a signed book; $5 from each ticket goes to support the nature center. Visit brownpapertickets.com/event/2724973 or call (800) 838-3006. (P.S. I'm a big fan of her essay collection, "I Can't Complain.")MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINELNick Petrie infuses thrillers with compassion for veteransKelly Jensen, 7 p.m. March 2. For "Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World" (Algonquin Young Readers), an anthology designed for readers 14 and older, Delavan writer-editor Jensen has pulled together original and reprinted essays, stories and artworks from both famous (Mindy Kaling, Roxane Gay) and less well-known but equally feisty contributors. The collection's intriguing titles include "I Have Always Eaten the Bread," "Dragging Myself into Self-Love" and "Great Girl Friendships in Fiction." Boswell Books.Christina Baker Kline, 2 p.m. March 5. The author of "Orphan Train" returns with "A Piece of the World" (William Morrow), a novel that  imagines the life of the woman depicted in Andrew Wyeth's famous painting "Christina's World." Kline will speak during a ticket event at Lynden Sculpture Garden, 2145 W. Brown Deer Road, River Hills. Tickets ($30, $25 for LSG members) include a signed copy of her novel. Visit lyndensculpturegarden.org/christinabakerkline or call (414) 446-8794.Will Schwalbe, 7 p.m. March 6. In his new "Books for Living" (Knopf), Schwalbe, author of "The End of Your Life Book Club," connects books he has loved ("Stuart Little," "Giovanni's Room") with the qualities he has learned from them. Boswell Books.Nickolas Butler, 7 p.m. March 7. Eau Claire novelist Butler ("Shotgun Lovesongs") will celebrate publication day of his new novel, "The Hearts of Men" (Ecco), at Milwaukee's Boswell Books. "Hearts" opens with a 13-year-old boy at camp making both a problematic discovery about his parents and an unexpected new friend, and follows him through a life-alerting crisis of adulthood.img...

Eleanor Norwood

Monday, January 02, 2017

Grace E. (Fiske) Norwood. She worked at US Envelope Co. for 15 years then she worked at Hahneman Hospital for 15 years before retiring. She was a member of Wesley United Methodist Church and the Audubon Society. She was always quick to help others. She loved children and enjoyed spending as much time as she could with her nieces and nephews especially her great nieces Jennifer and Sarah Amlaw. She was very active with the Francis Gardens Women’s Club. A graveside service will be held Tuesday, January 3, 2017 at 11:00 AM in Hope Cemetery, Worcester. There are no calling hours. BRITTON SHREWSBURY FUNERAL HOME, 648 Main Street, Shrewsbury is assisting the family with arrangements.

Joe Browder, a Guardian of the Florida Everglades, Dies at 78 - New York Times

Monday, October 24, 2016

Mr. Browder became a television reporter and producer for the NBC affiliate in Miami in the 1960s. But even then, he was a leader of the National Audubon Society in Florida. He left broadcasting in 1968 to devote himself to environmentalism and was the founding coordinator of the Everglades Coalition.When he and Nathaniel Reed, a former assistant Interior secretary, teamed to oppose the proposed jetport, near the border between Miami-Dade and Collier Counties, Miami-Dade’s mayor branded them “white militants.”But they successfully lobbied the aviation industry and persuaded the Nixon administration to withdraw federal funding for the jetport after demonstrating that it would endanger wetlands and the dwindling alligator population.“Joe was a conservation hero who proved that one person can change the world,” David Houghton, the president of the National Wildlife Refuge Association, said in a statement. “Big Cypress National Preserve, Everglades National Park and Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area are testament to his profound passion and dedication.”Besides Ms. Dunlap, Mr. Browder is survived by two sons from a former marriage, Ronald and Monte; and four grandchildren.Mr. Browder met Ms. Dunlap at a Senate hearing on the jetport and persuaded her to join Friends of the Earth. She had been studying landscape architecture and was working for the National Parks Conservation Association. (She went on to help found and become the president of the Environmental Policy Institute and the Environmental Policy Center in Washington.)“Look at it this way, Louise,” she recalled Mr. Browder telling her. “Would you rather have some influence over deciding where the airport will be located, or would you rather decide where to plant the trees and grass around the parking lots?” We're interested in your feedback on this page. Tell us what you think.

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What killed owl at Forest Lawn? Maybe not what you think. - The ... - Buffalo News

Monday, March 06, 2017

Tom Kerr, a naturalist with the Buffalo Audubon Society, said poisonings by birds living in urban areas can be fairly common."Even if rat poison isn't used in the immediate area, hawks and owls often leave a place like Forest Lawn Cemetery to hunt," Kerr said. "It is very hard to prevent this, especially when we don't know where the poison is being used.  The best thing to do is keep educating people on the subject and help them find alternatives to using poison that can unintentionally hurt predators."That's another reason Tripi recommends property owners concerned about rodent problems call the county health department or seek a licensed professional exterminator rather than taking matters into their own hands.It was unclear what type of poison, or its origin, led to the owl's death in this case.Forest Lawn's President Joseph P. Dispenza said the cemetery uses no poisons or pesticides on its grounds.Gorman confesses she's become "obsessed with owls" and has been "doing a lot of research" since making the unfortunate discovery last month."I hope this story moves people to find another way to deal with the rodent problem, like using live traps or glue traps," Gorman said. "Once a rat is poisoned, it becomes disoriented and slow and this is when the owl finds it as easy prey. Even if the first rat it eats doesn’t kill the owl, the poisons bio-accumulate until it reaches a fatal dose."...

DEC: rat poison likely killed Forest Lawn owl - Story - WKBW - WKBW-TV

Monday, March 06, 2017

That's why this situation was weird because one day it was there and the next day it dropped dead, seemingly without a cause," Tom Kerr said.  Kerr is a naturalist with Buffalo Audubon Society.Forest Lawn President Joe Dispenza said the incident was "terribly unfortunate".  The poison didn't come from the cemetery, as Dispenza explained they don't use animal or rat poison on the property."As a unique natural habitat in the city of Buffalo with many wildlife species, we are looking to our partners and the DEC to help provide direction to our community to help prevent any contamination of our parks and cemetery," Dispenza said.Kerr said it's likely the owl left the cemetery to hunt where it came across, and ate, a poisoned rat.  It is a common problem for birds of prey in cities.  Poisoned rats and rodents don't die immediately and can become easy targets for owls and hawks."It just looks like an easy meal to them," Kerr explained.  "A sick, dying rat is easy for them to grab and pick up and carry back and eat.  So it's really, really hard to figure out where it came from."In a statement, the Erie County Department of Health, which does use poison as one method to control the rodent population, said "every step necessary to prevent secondary poisoning of a non-targeted animal is taken".The DEC is currently performing tests to confirm the preliminary results, but those will not be available for several weeks.

Brit Bennett, Nickolas Butler among visiting authors this season - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Monday, January 23, 2017

Michael Benabib)Elinor Lipman, 2 p.m. Feb. 19. Comic novelist Lipman will talk about her new book, "One Turpentine Lane" (HMH), in conversation with "Lake Effect" voice Bonnie North at the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center, 1111 E. Brown Deer Road, Bayside. Tickets ($26) include a signed book; $5 from each ticket goes to support the nature center. Visit brownpapertickets.com/event/2724973 or call (800) 838-3006. (P.S. I'm a big fan of her essay collection, "I Can't Complain.")MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINELNick Petrie infuses thrillers with compassion for veteransKelly Jensen, 7 p.m. March 2. For "Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World" (Algonquin Young Readers), an anthology designed for readers 14 and older, Delavan writer-editor Jensen has pulled together original and reprinted essays, stories and artworks from both famous (Mindy Kaling, Roxane Gay) and less well-known but equally feisty contributors. The collection's intriguing titles include "I Have Always Eaten the Bread," "Dragging Myself into Self-Love" and "Great Girl Friendships in Fiction." Boswell Books.Christina Baker Kline, 2 p.m. March 5. The author of "Orphan Train" returns with "A Piece of the World" (William Morrow), a novel that  imagines the life of the woman depicted in Andrew Wyeth's famous painting "Christina's World." Kline will speak during a ticket event at Lynden Sculpture Garden, 2145 W. Brown Deer Road, River Hills. Tickets ($30, $25 for LSG members) include a signed copy of her novel. Visit lyndensculpturegarden.org/christinabakerkline or call (414) 446-8794.Will Schwalbe, 7 p.m. March 6. In his new "Books for Living" (Knopf), Schwalbe, author of "The End of Your Life Book Club," connects books he has loved ("Stuart Little," "Giovanni's Room") with the qualities he has learned from them. Boswell Books.Nickolas Butler, 7 p.m. March 7. Eau Claire novelist Butler ("Shotgun Lovesongs") will celebrate publication day of his new novel, "The Hearts of Men" (Ecco), at Milwaukee's Boswell Books. "Hearts" opens with a 13-year-old boy at camp making both a problematic discovery about his parents and an unexpected new friend, and follows him through a life-alerting crisis of adulthood.img...

Eleanor Norwood

Monday, January 02, 2017

Grace E. (Fiske) Norwood. She worked at US Envelope Co. for 15 years then she worked at Hahneman Hospital for 15 years before retiring. She was a member of Wesley United Methodist Church and the Audubon Society. She was always quick to help others. She loved children and enjoyed spending as much time as she could with her nieces and nephews especially her great nieces Jennifer and Sarah Amlaw. She was very active with the Francis Gardens Women’s Club. A graveside service will be held Tuesday, January 3, 2017 at 11:00 AM in Hope Cemetery, Worcester. There are no calling hours. BRITTON SHREWSBURY FUNERAL HOME, 648 Main Street, Shrewsbury is assisting the family with arrangements.

Joe Browder, a Guardian of the Florida Everglades, Dies at 78 - New York Times

Monday, October 24, 2016

Mr. Browder became a television reporter and producer for the NBC affiliate in Miami in the 1960s. But even then, he was a leader of the National Audubon Society in Florida. He left broadcasting in 1968 to devote himself to environmentalism and was the founding coordinator of the Everglades Coalition.When he and Nathaniel Reed, a former assistant Interior secretary, teamed to oppose the proposed jetport, near the border between Miami-Dade and Collier Counties, Miami-Dade’s mayor branded them “white militants.”But they successfully lobbied the aviation industry and persuaded the Nixon administration to withdraw federal funding for the jetport after demonstrating that it would endanger wetlands and the dwindling alligator population.“Joe was a conservation hero who proved that one person can change the world,” David Houghton, the president of the National Wildlife Refuge Association, said in a statement. “Big Cypress National Preserve, Everglades National Park and Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area are testament to his profound passion and dedication.”Besides Ms. Dunlap, Mr. Browder is survived by two sons from a former marriage, Ronald and Monte; and four grandchildren.Mr. Browder met Ms. Dunlap at a Senate hearing on the jetport and persuaded her to join Friends of the Earth. She had been studying landscape architecture and was working for the National Parks Conservation Association. (She went on to help found and become the president of the Environmental Policy Institute and the Environmental Policy Center in Washington.)“Look at it this way, Louise,” she recalled Mr. Browder telling her. “Would you rather have some influence over deciding where the airport will be located, or would you rather decide where to plant the trees and grass around the parking lots?” We're interested in your feedback on this page. Tell us what you think.