Bridgeton NJ Funeral Homes

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Freitag Funeral Home

137 W Commerce St
Bridgeton, NJ 08302
(856) 455-2600
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Freitag Kenneth W Funeral Director

137 West Commerce Street
Bridgeton, NJ 08302
(856) 455-2600
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Laurel Lawn Cemetery

485 Coral Avenue
Bridgeton, NJ 08302
(856) 455-6217
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Bridgeton NJ Obituaries and Death Notices

James Galanos, Fashion Designer for the Elite, Dies at 92 - New York Times

Monday, November 14, 2016

Sept. 20, 1924, in Philadelphia, to Gregory Galanos and Helen Gorgoliatos, immigrants from Naoussa, a town in Greek Macedonia, who ran a restaurant in southern New Jersey. He was raised in Bridgeton, N.J., and, after graduation from the Traphagen School of Fashion in New York in 1943, found work as a journeyman selling sketches to design houses, a common practice in the days before dressmakers automatically pitched their ambitions toward universal name recognition.Information on survivors was not immediately available.For a time Mr. Galanos worked as an assistant to the designer Hattie Carnegie. He decamped at age 20 for California, where he apprenticed himself to the costume designer Jean Louis at Columbia Studios. With the exception of an unpaid yearlong internship with the Parisian couturier Robert Piguet and a brief stint as a ready-to-wear designer in New York, he remained in California for the rest of his career.Yet he was never allied with his more adventurous West Coast competition, the designers from what is called the Golden Age of California who laid the groundwork for the athletic, sportswear-inspired styles that became a potent cultural export of postwar America.While Los Angeles contemporaries like Rudi Gernreich explored futurism with topless swimsuits, thongs and monokinis, Mr. Galanos stuck to supplying the “little nothing” dresses that were his trademark to a coterie of celebrity loyalists like Marlene Dietrich, Rosalind Russell and Diana Ross, and to the moneyed elite of both coasts.Shortly after he established Galanos Originals, Saks Fifth Avenue in Beverly Hills and Neiman Marcus in Dallas placed orders. Influential fashion editors soon championed his work, and his reputation was established.Among his early clients was Grace Kelly. Stanley Marcus, the chairman emeritus of Neiman Marcus, once recalled that with her wedding to Prince Rainier of Monaco approaching in 1956, she decided that “she didn’t have the right thing to wear, so she called Jimmy and said she needed one of his beautiful chiffon dresses” — within a week. He delivered.When Mr. Galanos retired from fashion in 1998, he was asked what he considered to be the highlight of his career.“The highlight of my career is simply existing for 46 years,” he answered. “The most important thing I have done is to maintain what I started out to do.”“I never deviated,” he added, “from what was most important, which was quality.”Correction: November 3, 2016An obituary in some editions on Monday and in some copies on Tuesday about the fashion designer James Galanos misidentified the location of the town from which his parents immigrated. They were from the town of Naoussa in Greek Macedonia — not the town by the same name on the Greek islan...

From green burials to tree urns; after-life options - Cherry Hill Courier Post

Monday, November 07, 2016

BEFOREIDIE Comfort at the end“I’ve had people discuss (space burial) at length with me,” said Ken Freitag of Freitag Funeral Home in Bridgeton.It came up during one meeting with a couple pre-planning their funerals. “The husband thought it was a great idea and the wife said, ‘Are you crazy? You’re afraid of heights,’” Freitag said.They are still mulling it over, he added.Cremated remains are mixed into the concrete to create artificial reefs. Photos courtesy of Eternal Reefs. (Photo: Photos courtesy of Eternal Reefs.)“Caring for our dead is one of man’s oldest professions,” said Genevieve Keeney, president and COO of the National Museum of Funeral History in Houston.The practice of embalming bodies can be traced back to the ancient Egyptians, Keeney said. They have the first record of the practice.What we commonly associate with funerals – an embalmed body and a wooden casket – goes back to the Civil War, said Bob Prout of Prout Funeral Home in Verona. Northern families didn’t want their sons buried on Southern battlefields, so they shipped the bodies back home. Embalming helped make those long trips by horse or train possible.“Burials are very traditional, they’re usually something passed down with the family,” Keeney said. They can also be cultural. In Tibet, Keeney said, where the ground is rocky, people practice “sky burials,” placing the body on mountaintops to be slowly carried away by birds.In some European countries with limited land space, burial plots are rented. “Once the last living family member is no longer alive and able to pay for that space, they will go and pick up all the family members and put them in a mass grave,” Keeney said.Often, the deceased don’t have funeral plans in place and family members left to choose gravitate toward conventional choices.“One of the things I’m very pas...

Gary Lynn Christensen - Burnet Bulletin

Monday, September 05, 2016

School district, graduating in 1967.He graduated with a degree in accounting in 1971 from Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina.There he met Ruth Hunsberger and they were married in Bridgeton, New Jersey on July 9, 1971. In 1973 Gary and Ruth moved to Colorado where Gary was a supervisor with Anderson & Whitney.They moved to San Antonio in 1981 where Gary became a manager with Grant Thornton until 1992.He retired this year from Padgett, Stratemann & Co, after working for 24 years as a tax manager in the San Antonio and Austin  offices.He enjoyed spending time with his daughters and grandkids and when time allowed, he enjoyed fishing for crappie and bass. Gary professed a faith in Jesus Christ.He was a charter member of Northeast Bible Evangelical Free Church in Garden Ridge, Texas, Where he served as a long term deacon and church treasurer for over 20 years.Most recently a member at Packsaddle Fellowship.Gary was preceded in death by his wife of 44 years, Ruth Christensen.He is survived by his loving daughters: Nicole ‘Niki’ Waggoner  and husband Chris of Festus, Missouri, and Elizabeth ‘Beth’ Smart  and husband Randy of Burnet; grandchildren; Gary Smart, Justin Smart, Trevor Waggoner, Brianna Waggoner, Tyler Smart and Brandon Waggoner; Parents George and Juanita Christensen of San Antonio; siblings: Greg Christensen  and wife Doris of San Antonio; DelRay Christensen  and wife Aldeane of San Antonio; Robyn Christensen and wife Linda of Bixby, Oklahoma; Georgine Christensen of San Antonio and Pauli...

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James Galanos, Fashion Designer for the Elite, Dies at 92 - New York Times

Monday, November 14, 2016

Sept. 20, 1924, in Philadelphia, to Gregory Galanos and Helen Gorgoliatos, immigrants from Naoussa, a town in Greek Macedonia, who ran a restaurant in southern New Jersey. He was raised in Bridgeton, N.J., and, after graduation from the Traphagen School of Fashion in New York in 1943, found work as a journeyman selling sketches to design houses, a common practice in the days before dressmakers automatically pitched their ambitions toward universal name recognition.Information on survivors was not immediately available.For a time Mr. Galanos worked as an assistant to the designer Hattie Carnegie. He decamped at age 20 for California, where he apprenticed himself to the costume designer Jean Louis at Columbia Studios. With the exception of an unpaid yearlong internship with the Parisian couturier Robert Piguet and a brief stint as a ready-to-wear designer in New York, he remained in California for the rest of his career.Yet he was never allied with his more adventurous West Coast competition, the designers from what is called the Golden Age of California who laid the groundwork for the athletic, sportswear-inspired styles that became a potent cultural export of postwar America.While Los Angeles contemporaries like Rudi Gernreich explored futurism with topless swimsuits, thongs and monokinis, Mr. Galanos stuck to supplying the “little nothing” dresses that were his trademark to a coterie of celebrity loyalists like Marlene Dietrich, Rosalind Russell and Diana Ross, and to the moneyed elite of both coasts.Shortly after he established Galanos Originals, Saks Fifth Avenue in Beverly Hills and Neiman Marcus in Dallas placed orders. Influential fashion editors soon championed his work, and his reputation was established.Among his early clients was Grace Kelly. Stanley Marcus, the chairman emeritus of Neiman Marcus, once recalled that with her wedding to Prince Rainier of Monaco approaching in 1956, she decided that “she didn’t have the right thing to wear, so she called Jimmy and said she needed one of his beautiful chiffon dresses” — within a week. He delivered.When Mr. Galanos retired from fashion in 1998, he was asked what he considered to be the highlight of his career.“The highlight of my career is simply existing for 46 years,” he answered. “The most important thing I have done is to maintain what I started out to do.”“I never deviated,” he added, “from what was most important, which was quality.”Correction: November 3, 2016An obituary in some editions on Monday and in some copies on Tuesday about the fashion designer James Galanos misidentified the location of the town from which his parents immigrated. They were from the town of Naoussa in Greek Macedonia — not the town by the same name on the Greek islan...

From green burials to tree urns; after-life options - Cherry Hill Courier Post

Monday, November 07, 2016

BEFOREIDIE Comfort at the end“I’ve had people discuss (space burial) at length with me,” said Ken Freitag of Freitag Funeral Home in Bridgeton.It came up during one meeting with a couple pre-planning their funerals. “The husband thought it was a great idea and the wife said, ‘Are you crazy? You’re afraid of heights,’” Freitag said.They are still mulling it over, he added.Cremated remains are mixed into the concrete to create artificial reefs. Photos courtesy of Eternal Reefs. (Photo: Photos courtesy of Eternal Reefs.)“Caring for our dead is one of man’s oldest professions,” said Genevieve Keeney, president and COO of the National Museum of Funeral History in Houston.The practice of embalming bodies can be traced back to the ancient Egyptians, Keeney said. They have the first record of the practice.What we commonly associate with funerals – an embalmed body and a wooden casket – goes back to the Civil War, said Bob Prout of Prout Funeral Home in Verona. Northern families didn’t want their sons buried on Southern battlefields, so they shipped the bodies back home. Embalming helped make those long trips by horse or train possible.“Burials are very traditional, they’re usually something passed down with the family,” Keeney said. They can also be cultural. In Tibet, Keeney said, where the ground is rocky, people practice “sky burials,” placing the body on mountaintops to be slowly carried away by birds.In some European countries with limited land space, burial plots are rented. “Once the last living family member is no longer alive and able to pay for that space, they will go and pick up all the family members and put them in a mass grave,” Keeney said.Often, the deceased don’t have funeral plans in place and family members left to choose gravitate toward conventional choices.“One of the things I’m very pas...

Gary Lynn Christensen - Burnet Bulletin

Monday, September 05, 2016

School district, graduating in 1967.He graduated with a degree in accounting in 1971 from Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina.There he met Ruth Hunsberger and they were married in Bridgeton, New Jersey on July 9, 1971. In 1973 Gary and Ruth moved to Colorado where Gary was a supervisor with Anderson & Whitney.They moved to San Antonio in 1981 where Gary became a manager with Grant Thornton until 1992.He retired this year from Padgett, Stratemann & Co, after working for 24 years as a tax manager in the San Antonio and Austin  offices.He enjoyed spending time with his daughters and grandkids and when time allowed, he enjoyed fishing for crappie and bass. Gary professed a faith in Jesus Christ.He was a charter member of Northeast Bible Evangelical Free Church in Garden Ridge, Texas, Where he served as a long term deacon and church treasurer for over 20 years.Most recently a member at Packsaddle Fellowship.Gary was preceded in death by his wife of 44 years, Ruth Christensen.He is survived by his loving daughters: Nicole ‘Niki’ Waggoner  and husband Chris of Festus, Missouri, and Elizabeth ‘Beth’ Smart  and husband Randy of Burnet; grandchildren; Gary Smart, Justin Smart, Trevor Waggoner, Brianna Waggoner, Tyler Smart and Brandon Waggoner; Parents George and Juanita Christensen of San Antonio; siblings: Greg Christensen  and wife Doris of San Antonio; DelRay Christensen  and wife Aldeane of San Antonio; Robyn Christensen and wife Linda of Bixby, Oklahoma; Georgine Christensen of San Antonio and Pauli...