Woodbridge NJ Funeral Homes

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Clover Leaf Park Cemetery

US Highway 1 North
Woodbridge, NJ 07095
(732) 634-2211
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Costello Joseph V Jr Funeral Director

44 Green Street
Woodbridge, NJ 07095
(732) 634-0264
Costello Joseph V Jr Funeral Director funeral flowers

Koyen Funeral Chapel

44 Green Street
Woodbridge, NJ 07095
(732) 634-0264
Koyen Funeral Chapel funeral flowers

Woodbridge NJ Obituaries and Death Notices

Innis Anne Nolan left her mark on Stouffville - YorkRegion.com

Monday, April 03, 2017

Of all cherishes, family members remained a top priority, including son John whose death saddened her greatly; daughter Lynda, (Mrs. Tony Woodbridge), Bath, England; four grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.   Firefighter honoured For a period of five days, flags at Whitchurch-Stouffville’s fire station No. 51 were lowered to half-mast. This act of respect served as a visible memorial to the late Don Doner, a volunteer firefighter more than 25 years. Mr. Doner died suddenly March 25 as the result of a heart attack. He was 87. Born at Gormley, the son of Clarence and Margaret Doner, Don grew up on the family’s Leslie Street farm, south of Stouffville Road. A skill in perfecting repairs plus expertise in public relations made him a customer favourite at four Stouffville hardware stores — Agnew’s Hardware, (J.K. Agnew); Crest Hardware, (Reg Stouffer); Hendricks Hardware, (Cec Hendricks) and Card’s Hardware, (Graydon Card). At the conclusion of 50 years’ dutiful employment he was presented with a coveted gold hammer by the Canadian Hardware Association. Following retirement, boating and fishing were favourite pastimes. For Don, wife Marian was the light of his life. They were married in 1951 and lived to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. His family too were subjects of much pride and joy — son Barry and daughter-in-law Laurie, Oshawa; daughter Sharon, Stouffville; grandchildren Jeremy, Katie, Nicholas and the recent arrival of a great-grandson; sister Helen (Dyck), Gormley; sister-in-law Dorothy Doner; brother-in-law Harrison Schlicter, Parkview Home and close friend Faye Christensen also of Parkview. Hundreds attended Sunday’s visitation at the O’Neill Funeral Home and Monday’s funeral conducted by pastor Tim Soukup at EastRidge Evangelical Missionary Church where  Don had earlier served as  leader of the boys’ brigade and head usher. He was interred at the Stouffville Cemetery.             ...

Obituary: Lorna J. Morley, 94, of Lexington - Patch.com

Monday, March 27, 2017

Chris) I. Kluchman and her husband David. Cherished grandmother to Collin, Alex and Caleb. Wise older sister of Anthony of Minneapolis and predeceased by her sister Christina Borden, and brother Woodbridge. Also survived by many loving grand nieces and nephews. Born in Baltimore in February 1923, she was the daughter of Felix and Isabel Morley. Lorna graduated from Bryn Mawr College on D-day in 1944. She went on to a long career in government service for many years including working for the CIA and General Accounting Office. While a single mother, she received a graduate degree in Public Administration from George Washington University. She was a passionate intellectual and was interested in philosophy, and spirituality. Later in life she made friends wherever she was, and enjoyed fellowship with her bridge and book groups. Memorial services will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 6 Meriam Street in Lexington on Tuesday March 21, 2017, at 11:00 a.m. Interment will be private. In memory of Lorna, donations can be made to the ASPCA.Obituary courtesy of Douglass Funeral Home Get free real-time news alerts from the Lexington Patch.

Law enforcement procession honored fallen WSU Police K9 Officer Collin Rose - The Macomb Daily

Monday, January 16, 2017

Ferris State University who was engaged to be married, was stopping someone on a bicycle when he was shot once in the head. Police said he was investigating car break-ins in Detroit’s Woodbridge neighborhood at the time.The shooting happened on Tuesday, and at 5:35 p.m. Wednesday, the young officer was pronounced dead.He is the second WSU officer to be shot while on duty but the first officer to be killed.DeAngelo Davis, 31, of Detroit has been charged in connection with the death of Rose, and was arraigned Friday on first-degree murder, murder of a police officer and gun crimes. He is being held in the Wayne County Jail without bond. Davis is scheduled to return to court Dec. 9 for a probable cause hearing and a preliminary exam is scheduled for Dec. 16 in Detroit.“It’s a very tragic situation and it brings to the light the dangers of the job,” Macomb County Sheriff Anthony Wickersham. “When things like this happen all law enforcement feel compelled to stand forward and support their fallen brother because they know – at any time it could be them.”The procession was led by WSU Police and followed by law enforcement vehicles from numerous counties including Wayne, Oakland and Macomb.“Officer Rose served the New Baltimore Police Department as a cadet in 2010 and his loss is being felt here deeply,” New Baltimore Police Sgt. Thomas Johannes said in a statement. “Officer Rose had an impeccable work ethic and loved what he did for the community. Our heartfelt condolences are offered to officer Rose’s family, fiancée, friends and fellow officers. The tragic event reminds all of us how precious life is and officer Rose should be honored.”Funeral arrangementsCollin James Rose is survived by his fiancé, Nicole Salgot, parents; Randy and Karen Rose, brother, Curtis, grandmother, Margaret Rysz, grandfather, Clifford Rose, aunts and Uncles; Debbie (Fred) Winkler, Diana (Robert) Shafer and David (Cheryl) Rose, in-laws; Cheryl (Steve) Salgot, brothers-in-law; Mark (Karen Light) Poulter and Matt Salgot and his dogs; Clyde and Wolverine. He had many cousins, friends, and family in blue that are going to miss him as well.Services will be as follows:VisitationWednesday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Ford Field, 2000 Brush Street, DetroitWednesday 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Kaul Funeral Home, 28433 Jefferson Avenue, St. Clair Shores.Thursday, Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 22412 Overlake Street, St. Clair Shores.Mass at 11 a.m.Burial to follow at approximately 1 p.m. at Resurrection Cemetery, 18201 Clinton River Road, Clinton Township.Memorial Mass at 11 a.m. on Fri. Dec. 2 at St. Ann Catholic Church, 12648 E.D. Avenue, Augusta, Michigan...

Funeral arrangements announced for Sen. Colgan | Headlines ... - Inside NoVA

Monday, January 16, 2017

Colgan was able to use that influence to lure colleges to Prince William, and he is widely credited with bringing Northern Virginia Community College campus buildings to both Woodbridge and Manassas, as well as spearheading the establishment of George Mason University’s Manassas campus.“Mason’s campus wouldn’t exist in Prince William without Chuck Colgan,” McPike said. “His leadership and vision of how the area’s needs were changing and the need for higher education to develop the skilled workforce that’s needed for this area made a difference.”Mason honored Colgan with a bronze statue at the school’s Science and Technology Campus last fall, placed immediately outside a building that bears his name.“Sen. Colgan was an advocate for students, a champion of public universities and a true visionary who devoted his time to building this great Northern Virginia region that we all love today,” Angel Cabrera, George Mason University’s president, said in a statement.But Colgan also focused on improving the area’s transportation infrastructure in his time in the Senate. He led the charge in earning funds for Virginia Railway Express, the expansion of Interstate 66 west of Manassas and the Va. 234 bypass.“In government, people talk about transportation issues for years and years and years, and that’s how things were with 234,” Parrish said. “Back then, there was no Prince William Parkway, and he, along with my dad and others, worked to get the 234 bypass through almost the entire county. They saw into the future, and recognized the need and made something happen.”Indeed, Colgan earned a reputation in the Senate as a lawmaker not bound by party lines, and forged a close friendship with Parrish’s father, the late Republican Del. Harry J. Parrish.“He always ran as a Democrat and served in that way, but he wasn't one that would use that as a means of getting something done for himself,” Parrish said. “He always saw the need of the citizens, and thought of them before himself, even to, potentially, his detriment.”McPike credits Colgan’s approach at least partially to the lessons about perseverance he learned early in life. Colgan was born in rural Maryland, and lost both his parents by age 5, leaving his grandparents to raise him.He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve after high school, and was called to serve in Italy at the end of World War II.“I love sitting down and talking to folks who are members of the greatest generation, like him,” McPike said. “It was really a privilege.”Colgan leaves behind his wife, Carmen Alicia Colgan, eight children, 24 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren, according to his family, and McPike said many of the family got the chance to spend time with Colgan immediately before he passed.“I think if we all think about what the ends of our days will look like, you couldn’t wish for anything else,” McPike said.And while Colgan may be gone, Prince William leaders expect that he won’t soon be forgotten in the county. Just last August, a new high school was named in his honor, but local lawmakers say the best way they can pay tribute to Colgan is to try and follow in his footsteps.“He really was the consummate gentleman,” Parrish said.

Funeral arrangements announced for Sen. Colgan - Inside NoVA

Monday, January 09, 2017

Colgan was able to use that influence to lure colleges to Prince William, and he is widely credited with bringing Northern Virginia Community College campus buildings to both Woodbridge and Manassas, as well as spearheading the establishment of George Mason University’s Manassas campus.“Mason’s campus wouldn’t exist in Prince William without Chuck Colgan,” McPike said. “His leadership and vision of how the area’s needs were changing and the need for higher education to develop the skilled workforce that’s needed for this area made a difference.”Mason honored Colgan with a bronze statue at the school’s Science and Technology Campus last fall, placed immediately outside a building that bears his name.“Sen. Colgan was an advocate for students, a champion of public universities and a true visionary who devoted his time to building this great Northern Virginia region that we all love today,” Angel Cabrera, George Mason University’s president, said in a statement.But Colgan also focused on improving the area’s transportation infrastructure in his time in the Senate. He led the charge in earning funds for Virginia Railway Express, the expansion of Interstate 66 west of Manassas and the Va. 234 bypass.“In government, people talk about transportation issues for years and years and years, and that’s how things were with 234,” Parrish said. “Back then, there was no Prince William Parkway, and he, along with my dad and others, worked to get the 234 bypass through almost the entire county. They saw into the future, and recognized the need and made something happen.”Indeed, Colgan earned a reputation in the Senate as a lawmaker not bound by party lines, and forged a close friendship with Parrish’s father, the late Republican Del. Harry J. Parrish.“He always ran as a Democrat and served in that way, but he wasn't one that would use that as a means of getting something done for himself,” Parrish said. “He always saw the need of the citizens, and thought of them before himself, even to, potentially, his detriment.”McPike credits Colgan’s approach at least partially to the lessons about perseverance he learned early in life. Colgan was born in rural Maryland, and lost both his parents by age 5, leaving his grandparents to raise him.He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve after high school, and was called to serve in Italy at the end of World War II.“I love sitting down and talking to folks who are members of the greatest generation, like him,” McPike said. “It was really a privilege.”Colgan leaves behind his wife, Carmen Alicia Colgan, eight children, 24 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren, according to his family, and McPike said many of the family got the chance to spend time with Colgan immediately before he passed.“I think if we all think about what the ends of our days will look like, you couldn’t wish for anything else,” McPike said.And while Colgan may be gone, Prince William leaders expect that he won’t soon be forgotten in the county. Just last August, a new high school was named in his honor, but local lawmakers say the best way they can pay tribute to Colgan is to try and follow in his footsteps.“He really was the consummate gentleman,” Parrish said.

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Innis Anne Nolan left her mark on Stouffville - YorkRegion.com

Monday, April 03, 2017

Of all cherishes, family members remained a top priority, including son John whose death saddened her greatly; daughter Lynda, (Mrs. Tony Woodbridge), Bath, England; four grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.   Firefighter honoured For a period of five days, flags at Whitchurch-Stouffville’s fire station No. 51 were lowered to half-mast. This act of respect served as a visible memorial to the late Don Doner, a volunteer firefighter more than 25 years. Mr. Doner died suddenly March 25 as the result of a heart attack. He was 87. Born at Gormley, the son of Clarence and Margaret Doner, Don grew up on the family’s Leslie Street farm, south of Stouffville Road. A skill in perfecting repairs plus expertise in public relations made him a customer favourite at four Stouffville hardware stores — Agnew’s Hardware, (J.K. Agnew); Crest Hardware, (Reg Stouffer); Hendricks Hardware, (Cec Hendricks) and Card’s Hardware, (Graydon Card). At the conclusion of 50 years’ dutiful employment he was presented with a coveted gold hammer by the Canadian Hardware Association. Following retirement, boating and fishing were favourite pastimes. For Don, wife Marian was the light of his life. They were married in 1951 and lived to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. His family too were subjects of much pride and joy — son Barry and daughter-in-law Laurie, Oshawa; daughter Sharon, Stouffville; grandchildren Jeremy, Katie, Nicholas and the recent arrival of a great-grandson; sister Helen (Dyck), Gormley; sister-in-law Dorothy Doner; brother-in-law Harrison Schlicter, Parkview Home and close friend Faye Christensen also of Parkview. Hundreds attended Sunday’s visitation at the O’Neill Funeral Home and Monday’s funeral conducted by pastor Tim Soukup at EastRidge Evangelical Missionary Church where  Don had earlier served as  leader of the boys’ brigade and head usher. He was interred at the Stouffville Cemetery.             ...

Obituary: Lorna J. Morley, 94, of Lexington - Patch.com

Monday, March 27, 2017

Chris) I. Kluchman and her husband David. Cherished grandmother to Collin, Alex and Caleb. Wise older sister of Anthony of Minneapolis and predeceased by her sister Christina Borden, and brother Woodbridge. Also survived by many loving grand nieces and nephews. Born in Baltimore in February 1923, she was the daughter of Felix and Isabel Morley. Lorna graduated from Bryn Mawr College on D-day in 1944. She went on to a long career in government service for many years including working for the CIA and General Accounting Office. While a single mother, she received a graduate degree in Public Administration from George Washington University. She was a passionate intellectual and was interested in philosophy, and spirituality. Later in life she made friends wherever she was, and enjoyed fellowship with her bridge and book groups. Memorial services will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 6 Meriam Street in Lexington on Tuesday March 21, 2017, at 11:00 a.m. Interment will be private. In memory of Lorna, donations can be made to the ASPCA.Obituary courtesy of Douglass Funeral Home Get free real-time news alerts from the Lexington Patch.

Law enforcement procession honored fallen WSU Police K9 Officer Collin Rose - The Macomb Daily

Monday, January 16, 2017

Ferris State University who was engaged to be married, was stopping someone on a bicycle when he was shot once in the head. Police said he was investigating car break-ins in Detroit’s Woodbridge neighborhood at the time.The shooting happened on Tuesday, and at 5:35 p.m. Wednesday, the young officer was pronounced dead.He is the second WSU officer to be shot while on duty but the first officer to be killed.DeAngelo Davis, 31, of Detroit has been charged in connection with the death of Rose, and was arraigned Friday on first-degree murder, murder of a police officer and gun crimes. He is being held in the Wayne County Jail without bond. Davis is scheduled to return to court Dec. 9 for a probable cause hearing and a preliminary exam is scheduled for Dec. 16 in Detroit.“It’s a very tragic situation and it brings to the light the dangers of the job,” Macomb County Sheriff Anthony Wickersham. “When things like this happen all law enforcement feel compelled to stand forward and support their fallen brother because they know – at any time it could be them.”The procession was led by WSU Police and followed by law enforcement vehicles from numerous counties including Wayne, Oakland and Macomb.“Officer Rose served the New Baltimore Police Department as a cadet in 2010 and his loss is being felt here deeply,” New Baltimore Police Sgt. Thomas Johannes said in a statement. “Officer Rose had an impeccable work ethic and loved what he did for the community. Our heartfelt condolences are offered to officer Rose’s family, fiancée, friends and fellow officers. The tragic event reminds all of us how precious life is and officer Rose should be honored.”Funeral arrangementsCollin James Rose is survived by his fiancé, Nicole Salgot, parents; Randy and Karen Rose, brother, Curtis, grandmother, Margaret Rysz, grandfather, Clifford Rose, aunts and Uncles; Debbie (Fred) Winkler, Diana (Robert) Shafer and David (Cheryl) Rose, in-laws; Cheryl (Steve) Salgot, brothers-in-law; Mark (Karen Light) Poulter and Matt Salgot and his dogs; Clyde and Wolverine. He had many cousins, friends, and family in blue that are going to miss him as well.Services will be as follows:VisitationWednesday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Ford Field, 2000 Brush Street, DetroitWednesday 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Kaul Funeral Home, 28433 Jefferson Avenue, St. Clair Shores.Thursday, Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 22412 Overlake Street, St. Clair Shores.Mass at 11 a.m.Burial to follow at approximately 1 p.m. at Resurrection Cemetery, 18201 Clinton River Road, Clinton Township.Memorial Mass at 11 a.m. on Fri. Dec. 2 at St. Ann Catholic Church, 12648 E.D. Avenue, Augusta, Michigan...

Funeral arrangements announced for Sen. Colgan | Headlines ... - Inside NoVA

Monday, January 16, 2017

Colgan was able to use that influence to lure colleges to Prince William, and he is widely credited with bringing Northern Virginia Community College campus buildings to both Woodbridge and Manassas, as well as spearheading the establishment of George Mason University’s Manassas campus.“Mason’s campus wouldn’t exist in Prince William without Chuck Colgan,” McPike said. “His leadership and vision of how the area’s needs were changing and the need for higher education to develop the skilled workforce that’s needed for this area made a difference.”Mason honored Colgan with a bronze statue at the school’s Science and Technology Campus last fall, placed immediately outside a building that bears his name.“Sen. Colgan was an advocate for students, a champion of public universities and a true visionary who devoted his time to building this great Northern Virginia region that we all love today,” Angel Cabrera, George Mason University’s president, said in a statement.But Colgan also focused on improving the area’s transportation infrastructure in his time in the Senate. He led the charge in earning funds for Virginia Railway Express, the expansion of Interstate 66 west of Manassas and the Va. 234 bypass.“In government, people talk about transportation issues for years and years and years, and that’s how things were with 234,” Parrish said. “Back then, there was no Prince William Parkway, and he, along with my dad and others, worked to get the 234 bypass through almost the entire county. They saw into the future, and recognized the need and made something happen.”Indeed, Colgan earned a reputation in the Senate as a lawmaker not bound by party lines, and forged a close friendship with Parrish’s father, the late Republican Del. Harry J. Parrish.“He always ran as a Democrat and served in that way, but he wasn't one that would use that as a means of getting something done for himself,” Parrish said. “He always saw the need of the citizens, and thought of them before himself, even to, potentially, his detriment.”McPike credits Colgan’s approach at least partially to the lessons about perseverance he learned early in life. Colgan was born in rural Maryland, and lost both his parents by age 5, leaving his grandparents to raise him.He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve after high school, and was called to serve in Italy at the end of World War II.“I love sitting down and talking to folks who are members of the greatest generation, like him,” McPike said. “It was really a privilege.”Colgan leaves behind his wife, Carmen Alicia Colgan, eight children, 24 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren, according to his family, and McPike said many of the family got the chance to spend time with Colgan immediately before he passed.“I think if we all think about what the ends of our days will look like, you couldn’t wish for anything else,” McPike said.And while Colgan may be gone, Prince William leaders expect that he won’t soon be forgotten in the county. Just last August, a new high school was named in his honor, but local lawmakers say the best way they can pay tribute to Colgan is to try and follow in his footsteps.“He really was the consummate gentleman,” Parrish said.

Funeral arrangements announced for Sen. Colgan - Inside NoVA

Monday, January 09, 2017

Colgan was able to use that influence to lure colleges to Prince William, and he is widely credited with bringing Northern Virginia Community College campus buildings to both Woodbridge and Manassas, as well as spearheading the establishment of George Mason University’s Manassas campus.“Mason’s campus wouldn’t exist in Prince William without Chuck Colgan,” McPike said. “His leadership and vision of how the area’s needs were changing and the need for higher education to develop the skilled workforce that’s needed for this area made a difference.”Mason honored Colgan with a bronze statue at the school’s Science and Technology Campus last fall, placed immediately outside a building that bears his name.“Sen. Colgan was an advocate for students, a champion of public universities and a true visionary who devoted his time to building this great Northern Virginia region that we all love today,” Angel Cabrera, George Mason University’s president, said in a statement.But Colgan also focused on improving the area’s transportation infrastructure in his time in the Senate. He led the charge in earning funds for Virginia Railway Express, the expansion of Interstate 66 west of Manassas and the Va. 234 bypass.“In government, people talk about transportation issues for years and years and years, and that’s how things were with 234,” Parrish said. “Back then, there was no Prince William Parkway, and he, along with my dad and others, worked to get the 234 bypass through almost the entire county. They saw into the future, and recognized the need and made something happen.”Indeed, Colgan earned a reputation in the Senate as a lawmaker not bound by party lines, and forged a close friendship with Parrish’s father, the late Republican Del. Harry J. Parrish.“He always ran as a Democrat and served in that way, but he wasn't one that would use that as a means of getting something done for himself,” Parrish said. “He always saw the need of the citizens, and thought of them before himself, even to, potentially, his detriment.”McPike credits Colgan’s approach at least partially to the lessons about perseverance he learned early in life. Colgan was born in rural Maryland, and lost both his parents by age 5, leaving his grandparents to raise him.He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve after high school, and was called to serve in Italy at the end of World War II.“I love sitting down and talking to folks who are members of the greatest generation, like him,” McPike said. “It was really a privilege.”Colgan leaves behind his wife, Carmen Alicia Colgan, eight children, 24 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren, according to his family, and McPike said many of the family got the chance to spend time with Colgan immediately before he passed.“I think if we all think about what the ends of our days will look like, you couldn’t wish for anything else,” McPike said.And while Colgan may be gone, Prince William leaders expect that he won’t soon be forgotten in the county. Just last August, a new high school was named in his honor, but local lawmakers say the best way they can pay tribute to Colgan is to try and follow in his footsteps.“He really was the consummate gentleman,” Parrish said.