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Compassion Mortuary

120 North 3rd Street
Grants, NM 87020
(505) 287-5511
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Grants Mortuary

1100 East High Street
Grants, NM 87020
(505) 287-2927
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Grants NM Obituaries and Death Notices

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

CLOSE Sacred Heart Church, built by Belgian immigrants over 100 years ago and colloquially known as the "old Belgian Church", has been under construction since 2001 and is being restored by descendants of the immigrants who originally built it. Soon, they will replace the belfry and return the original bell from its 50-year stay at Dupuyer's Holy Cross Catholic Church. TRIBUNE VIDEO/JULIA MOSSBuy PhotoSacred Heart Church’s original bell hangs before the Holy Cross Catholic Church in Dupuyer. This bell will be moved back to the Belgian Colony Church and will be replaced with a steel bell Mike Habets bought from Craigslist.(Photo: Tribune photo/Julia Moss)Buy PhotoFor 104 years, the distinctive tone of one, unique church bell has rung out across Pondera County.The bell hung for 50 years in the belfry of Sacred Heart Church, a small house of worship that stands near the base of a low butte, roughly nine miles east of Valier. The words cast in relief upon the bell’s copper sides identify its historic origin.“Catholic Colony Establish...

Ancient Chinese ritual comes to Oakland's Chapel of the Chimes - East Bay Times

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Chapel of the Chimes, and blessed them with chanting, readings and music softly played on a small drum, wooden percussion instruments, bells, bowls and a small gong.The five, Chinese immigrants, arranged offerings of incense, apples, water, oranges, buns, mushrooms and other food, including tofu renderings of shrimp and other seafood dishes, on the altars as a type of “sutra,” Hoang Truong said.Ching Ming ceremonies traditionally coincide with spring planting, set at the 106th day after winter solstice, and at harvest time in the fall. So there will be another Ching Ming ceremony in September.“Growing up in Western society, we lose our connection. This gives us a way to connect with our culture,” said Yau Kung Moon’s Johnny Leung, visiting from Australia.“The whole family will gather together and go to the grave to clean it, bring flowers, gather together and talk,” Truong said. Given the brief time they have been in the country, with few graves to tend, such celebrations often are held at home or at temples, she said.Truong tapped a small drum and chimed a bell at intervals in the chanting. She was accompanied by the group’s leader, Quang Truong, who chimed a small gong as he led the chanting from a position at the altar’s left side.Across from him, Minh Truong kept a rhythm on the serrated scales of two wooden fish, called mokugyo or muyu. A few feet farther from the altar, at his right, Thanh Quach chanted and sounded a small set of cymbals. Opposite him, Tohoa Hong augmented her chanting with another small, brass percussion instrument.“We are here to suffer. We try to cultivate ourselves to not come back to suffering,” Hoang Truong said.She described various sutras, such as abstinence from killing, gambling, drinking, smoking and sexual misconduct. “If you make good karma, you might go to the Pure Land and become Buddha. We try, but it’s hard,” she said.“Maybe they (Chapel of the Chimes) want more and more people to know the Chinese culture. There are a lot of Chinese here. This introduced our culture to the community,” Hoang Truong said.“We serve quite a big Buddhist community,” said Chapel of the Chimes’ location manager David Madden, who helped organize the commemoration.The ...

Dr. Sandra K. Willsie - Parsons Sun

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Chest Foundation, for which she later served as a board member. Today the Chest Foundation continues providing grants around the world to fight respiratory diseases.Sandra made eight pro bono trips to provide physicians in Honduras, Panama, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic the latest research updates on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease research. Sandra was honored to serve as president of Women Executives in Science and Healthcare and as board president of the American Heart Association’s Midwest Affiliate (greater Kansas City area), where her primary focus was on fundraising for the Go Red for Women Initiative and the launching of the Circle of Red Initiative.In the corporate world Sandra served as medical director, principal investigator and a system-wide chair responsible for global harmonization of medical safety practices and policies. At the time of her diagnosis, Dr. Willsie had been volunteering for over 30 years at the KC CARE Clinic in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, and was a committee member of the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on respiratory and anesthesiology devices.As stated by one close friend, “Sandra was an amazing woman, selfless leader, gifted doctor, generous healer and respected scholar who made a difference in the lives of so many. She inspired a generation of new physicians to be and do more by following her example of excellence and integrity.”Sandra was born Aug. 18, 1953, in Parsons, and growing up there, she never forgot her small town roots or Christian values. She was a dutiful daughter and awesome sister who never stopped looking out for her family; as an aunt, she thought and cared for her nephews and niece as if they were her own. Sandra and her husband, Tom, loved their two bichon dogs, Minnie and Mojo, and traveled often. One of her most favorite trips was to the Holy Land, organized by Church of the Resurrection and led by pastor Adam Hamilton.For those who knew her, Sandra was compassionate and loving and always went out of her way to make the downhearted smile and feel included. Her energy and enthusiasm touched many as she loved to laugh and encouraged others to follow their dreams. Sandra’s legacy simply stated was to treat others as you would want to be treated. We were blessed to have known her, and she will be missed by many, especially her family who are comforted by their faith in knowing Sandra is now home at peace and with our Lord, Jesus Christ.The memorial service will be at 4 p.m. Saturday in Wesley Chapel at Church of the Resurrection, 13720 Roe, Leawood, with a reception immediately following.The family requests in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Sandra’s memory to the KC CARE Clinic, attention Sheridan Wood, CEO, 3515 Broadway, Kansas City, MO 64111.

Last Salute - Carroll Daily Times Herald

Monday, April 03, 2017

Christmas with his late wife.“He did,” she said. “He went home on Christmas Day.”The couple had three sons: Ken, Steve and Jeff.Schumacher was born March 28, 1925, a son of German immigrants John and Freda Schumacher, who had met in western Illinois before settling on the farmstead north of Coon Rapids where Schumacher resided until near the end of his life. He’s always gone by “John J.” because there were so many men named John in his family and the southern part of Carroll County in his youth.“I’ve been John J. so long I’ve even gotten mail addressed to Mr. J,” Schumacher said.After the war, Schumacher started a career in farming and real estate and insurance, for a time owning Iowa International Real Estate and Insurance. He also worked tirelessly on economic development in Coon Rapids and represented that city on the Carroll Area Development Corporation.An electrical substation southwest of Glidden owned by Corn Belt Power Cooperative was dedicated in Schumacher’s honor in 2014 for his long service to the cooperative industry.In 2012, when Coon Rapids dedicated its Veterans Memorial west of Coon Rapids-Bayard High School, Schumacher was there, front and center, wearing the Army uniform assigned to him in 1944.For years he used a pair of German binoculars he found during the war. His walls are adorned with photos and drawings and memories of the war. Schumacher, near the end of that 2013 interview, said he thinks often of the men who didn’t come home and marry their high school loves, who gave the years of life he enjoyed since World War II to their country.“It seemed like we were always on the attack,” Schumacher said. “When they say, ‘How many people did you see die?’… Well, they just disappeared.”...

Obituary: Robert 'Buzz' Miller - Twin Falls Times-News

Monday, March 13, 2017

Gunnison, Colorado where Buzz grew up on his stepfather’s cattle ranch. Buzz graduated from Gunnison High School. He attended college in Odessa, Texas.Buzz met Wilma “Billie” Magonegil in Grants, New Mexico where he was working at the Kerr-McGee Uranium mine. Buzz and Billie married on May 15, 1962 in Grants and had their first child, Robin, there. They moved to Elko, Nevada in 1965 where their second daughter, Rachelle, was born. A few years later, they moved to Pocatello, Idaho where their third daughter, Renee, was born. Their final move brought them to Jerome on February 28, 1968.During Buzz’s lifetime, he had many occupations, he was truly a jack of all trades. He was a miner, an insurance adjuster for General Motors, a truck driver, an automotive painter, an auto mechanic, car salesman, construction worker, auto parts shop owner, emu rancher, gun cabinet builder, and an antique store owner.But Buzz’s favorite “occupation” was being a grandfather. He loved having his grandchildren around. Teaching them to fish, shoot a gun, and regaling them with grand stories. He was always up for an adventure. His grandchildren, Aidan and Finn, brought him great joy.Buzz loved socializing, dancing and just visiting with anyone. He was well known around Jerome, and will be missed by many.Buzz was preceded in death by his wife of 26 years, Wilma “Billie” Miller; two step children, Terri and Colleen; father,...

John Walsh, co-founder COPD and Alpha-1 foundations, dies at 68 - Miami Herald

Monday, March 13, 2017

Alpha-1 Foundation in Coconut Grove, followed by AlphaNet, a disease and health management company that provides services for people with the deficiency.The nonprofits quickly flourished with grants, matching funds, advocacy and influence, leading to research centers nationwide, including at Harvard, a gene therapy program for the lung and liver at University of Florida and University of California at San Diego, and an Alpha-1 registry at the Medical University at South Carolina. The nonprofits also have raised millions for research. “Our mission is to put ourselves out of business,” Walsh told the Miami Herald in 2005. “We want to cure Alpha-1.”Here was a man who was going to make big changes in the way the world thought about COPD and in my life as a patient. He was determined to draw attention to the disease, to erase the stigma of being diagnosed, to encourage patients to become active and to become involved in research.Karen Deitemeyer’s post on the COPD Foundation website.A year earlier, in 2004, Walsh had the same mission when he co-founded and became the first president of the COPD Foundation in Coconut Grove, with a second office in Washington. He followed with the COPD Advocacy program and the Congressional COPD Caucus to push for more funding for research and patient access. In 2014, Walsh, who lived in Coral Gables, was elected to the National Health Council’s board of directors.“John was a former Army Ranger. Though he was afraid of heights, he volunteered for Airborne School and became a paratrooper, because parachute jumping out of planes is a required skill for a ranger. That should tell you a lot about the strength of his character, will and commitment to mission,” said Marcia Ritchie, the Alpha-1 Foundation’s chief operating officer.“John had that astonishing power that people get when they have high energy and passion for something and a willingness to devote their life to it,” Campbell said. “He was starting from a tiny patient base. He had no power base. Started with little funding. But he built the core organization of the Alpha-1 world and then the core foundation of the COPD world. That’s an astonishing number of achievements in a little over 20 years.”Walsh is survived by his wife Diane, daughter Linda, granddaughter Lily, his brother Fred, and sisters Susan Ferro and Judy Walsh. The family plans a private celebration of life.

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Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

CLOSE Sacred Heart Church, built by Belgian immigrants over 100 years ago and colloquially known as the "old Belgian Church", has been under construction since 2001 and is being restored by descendants of the immigrants who originally built it. Soon, they will replace the belfry and return the original bell from its 50-year stay at Dupuyer's Holy Cross Catholic Church. TRIBUNE VIDEO/JULIA MOSSBuy PhotoSacred Heart Church’s original bell hangs before the Holy Cross Catholic Church in Dupuyer. This bell will be moved back to the Belgian Colony Church and will be replaced with a steel bell Mike Habets bought from Craigslist.(Photo: Tribune photo/Julia Moss)Buy PhotoFor 104 years, the distinctive tone of one, unique church bell has rung out across Pondera County.The bell hung for 50 years in the belfry of Sacred Heart Church, a small house of worship that stands near the base of a low butte, roughly nine miles east of Valier. The words cast in relief upon the bell’s copper sides identify its historic origin.“Catholic Colony Establish...

Ancient Chinese ritual comes to Oakland's Chapel of the Chimes - East Bay Times

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Chapel of the Chimes, and blessed them with chanting, readings and music softly played on a small drum, wooden percussion instruments, bells, bowls and a small gong.The five, Chinese immigrants, arranged offerings of incense, apples, water, oranges, buns, mushrooms and other food, including tofu renderings of shrimp and other seafood dishes, on the altars as a type of “sutra,” Hoang Truong said.Ching Ming ceremonies traditionally coincide with spring planting, set at the 106th day after winter solstice, and at harvest time in the fall. So there will be another Ching Ming ceremony in September.“Growing up in Western society, we lose our connection. This gives us a way to connect with our culture,” said Yau Kung Moon’s Johnny Leung, visiting from Australia.“The whole family will gather together and go to the grave to clean it, bring flowers, gather together and talk,” Truong said. Given the brief time they have been in the country, with few graves to tend, such celebrations often are held at home or at temples, she said.Truong tapped a small drum and chimed a bell at intervals in the chanting. She was accompanied by the group’s leader, Quang Truong, who chimed a small gong as he led the chanting from a position at the altar’s left side.Across from him, Minh Truong kept a rhythm on the serrated scales of two wooden fish, called mokugyo or muyu. A few feet farther from the altar, at his right, Thanh Quach chanted and sounded a small set of cymbals. Opposite him, Tohoa Hong augmented her chanting with another small, brass percussion instrument.“We are here to suffer. We try to cultivate ourselves to not come back to suffering,” Hoang Truong said.She described various sutras, such as abstinence from killing, gambling, drinking, smoking and sexual misconduct. “If you make good karma, you might go to the Pure Land and become Buddha. We try, but it’s hard,” she said.“Maybe they (Chapel of the Chimes) want more and more people to know the Chinese culture. There are a lot of Chinese here. This introduced our culture to the community,” Hoang Truong said.“We serve quite a big Buddhist community,” said Chapel of the Chimes’ location manager David Madden, who helped organize the commemoration.The ...

Dr. Sandra K. Willsie - Parsons Sun

Saturday, April 08, 2017

Chest Foundation, for which she later served as a board member. Today the Chest Foundation continues providing grants around the world to fight respiratory diseases.Sandra made eight pro bono trips to provide physicians in Honduras, Panama, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic the latest research updates on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease research. Sandra was honored to serve as president of Women Executives in Science and Healthcare and as board president of the American Heart Association’s Midwest Affiliate (greater Kansas City area), where her primary focus was on fundraising for the Go Red for Women Initiative and the launching of the Circle of Red Initiative.In the corporate world Sandra served as medical director, principal investigator and a system-wide chair responsible for global harmonization of medical safety practices and policies. At the time of her diagnosis, Dr. Willsie had been volunteering for over 30 years at the KC CARE Clinic in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, and was a committee member of the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on respiratory and anesthesiology devices.As stated by one close friend, “Sandra was an amazing woman, selfless leader, gifted doctor, generous healer and respected scholar who made a difference in the lives of so many. She inspired a generation of new physicians to be and do more by following her example of excellence and integrity.”Sandra was born Aug. 18, 1953, in Parsons, and growing up there, she never forgot her small town roots or Christian values. She was a dutiful daughter and awesome sister who never stopped looking out for her family; as an aunt, she thought and cared for her nephews and niece as if they were her own. Sandra and her husband, Tom, loved their two bichon dogs, Minnie and Mojo, and traveled often. One of her most favorite trips was to the Holy Land, organized by Church of the Resurrection and led by pastor Adam Hamilton.For those who knew her, Sandra was compassionate and loving and always went out of her way to make the downhearted smile and feel included. Her energy and enthusiasm touched many as she loved to laugh and encouraged others to follow their dreams. Sandra’s legacy simply stated was to treat others as you would want to be treated. We were blessed to have known her, and she will be missed by many, especially her family who are comforted by their faith in knowing Sandra is now home at peace and with our Lord, Jesus Christ.The memorial service will be at 4 p.m. Saturday in Wesley Chapel at Church of the Resurrection, 13720 Roe, Leawood, with a reception immediately following.The family requests in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Sandra’s memory to the KC CARE Clinic, attention Sheridan Wood, CEO, 3515 Broadway, Kansas City, MO 64111.

Last Salute - Carroll Daily Times Herald

Monday, April 03, 2017

Christmas with his late wife.“He did,” she said. “He went home on Christmas Day.”The couple had three sons: Ken, Steve and Jeff.Schumacher was born March 28, 1925, a son of German immigrants John and Freda Schumacher, who had met in western Illinois before settling on the farmstead north of Coon Rapids where Schumacher resided until near the end of his life. He’s always gone by “John J.” because there were so many men named John in his family and the southern part of Carroll County in his youth.“I’ve been John J. so long I’ve even gotten mail addressed to Mr. J,” Schumacher said.After the war, Schumacher started a career in farming and real estate and insurance, for a time owning Iowa International Real Estate and Insurance. He also worked tirelessly on economic development in Coon Rapids and represented that city on the Carroll Area Development Corporation.An electrical substation southwest of Glidden owned by Corn Belt Power Cooperative was dedicated in Schumacher’s honor in 2014 for his long service to the cooperative industry.In 2012, when Coon Rapids dedicated its Veterans Memorial west of Coon Rapids-Bayard High School, Schumacher was there, front and center, wearing the Army uniform assigned to him in 1944.For years he used a pair of German binoculars he found during the war. His walls are adorned with photos and drawings and memories of the war. Schumacher, near the end of that 2013 interview, said he thinks often of the men who didn’t come home and marry their high school loves, who gave the years of life he enjoyed since World War II to their country.“It seemed like we were always on the attack,” Schumacher said. “When they say, ‘How many people did you see die?’… Well, they just disappeared.”...

Obituary: Robert 'Buzz' Miller - Twin Falls Times-News

Monday, March 13, 2017

Gunnison, Colorado where Buzz grew up on his stepfather’s cattle ranch. Buzz graduated from Gunnison High School. He attended college in Odessa, Texas.Buzz met Wilma “Billie” Magonegil in Grants, New Mexico where he was working at the Kerr-McGee Uranium mine. Buzz and Billie married on May 15, 1962 in Grants and had their first child, Robin, there. They moved to Elko, Nevada in 1965 where their second daughter, Rachelle, was born. A few years later, they moved to Pocatello, Idaho where their third daughter, Renee, was born. Their final move brought them to Jerome on February 28, 1968.During Buzz’s lifetime, he had many occupations, he was truly a jack of all trades. He was a miner, an insurance adjuster for General Motors, a truck driver, an automotive painter, an auto mechanic, car salesman, construction worker, auto parts shop owner, emu rancher, gun cabinet builder, and an antique store owner.But Buzz’s favorite “occupation” was being a grandfather. He loved having his grandchildren around. Teaching them to fish, shoot a gun, and regaling them with grand stories. He was always up for an adventure. His grandchildren, Aidan and Finn, brought him great joy.Buzz loved socializing, dancing and just visiting with anyone. He was well known around Jerome, and will be missed by many.Buzz was preceded in death by his wife of 26 years, Wilma “Billie” Miller; two step children, Terri and Colleen; father,...

John Walsh, co-founder COPD and Alpha-1 foundations, dies at 68 - Miami Herald

Monday, March 13, 2017

Alpha-1 Foundation in Coconut Grove, followed by AlphaNet, a disease and health management company that provides services for people with the deficiency.The nonprofits quickly flourished with grants, matching funds, advocacy and influence, leading to research centers nationwide, including at Harvard, a gene therapy program for the lung and liver at University of Florida and University of California at San Diego, and an Alpha-1 registry at the Medical University at South Carolina. The nonprofits also have raised millions for research. “Our mission is to put ourselves out of business,” Walsh told the Miami Herald in 2005. “We want to cure Alpha-1.”Here was a man who was going to make big changes in the way the world thought about COPD and in my life as a patient. He was determined to draw attention to the disease, to erase the stigma of being diagnosed, to encourage patients to become active and to become involved in research.Karen Deitemeyer’s post on the COPD Foundation website.A year earlier, in 2004, Walsh had the same mission when he co-founded and became the first president of the COPD Foundation in Coconut Grove, with a second office in Washington. He followed with the COPD Advocacy program and the Congressional COPD Caucus to push for more funding for research and patient access. In 2014, Walsh, who lived in Coral Gables, was elected to the National Health Council’s board of directors.“John was a former Army Ranger. Though he was afraid of heights, he volunteered for Airborne School and became a paratrooper, because parachute jumping out of planes is a required skill for a ranger. That should tell you a lot about the strength of his character, will and commitment to mission,” said Marcia Ritchie, the Alpha-1 Foundation’s chief operating officer.“John had that astonishing power that people get when they have high energy and passion for something and a willingness to devote their life to it,” Campbell said. “He was starting from a tiny patient base. He had no power base. Started with little funding. But he built the core organization of the Alpha-1 world and then the core foundation of the COPD world. That’s an astonishing number of achievements in a little over 20 years.”Walsh is survived by his wife Diane, daughter Linda, granddaughter Lily, his brother Fred, and sisters Susan Ferro and Judy Walsh. The family plans a private celebration of life.