Amsterdam NY Funeral Homes

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Amsterdam Funeral Chapel

13 Belmont Place
Amsterdam, NY 12010
(518) 842-3113
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Betz John G Funeral Director

171 Guy Park Avenue
Amsterdam, NY 12010
(518) 843-1920
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Amsterdam NY Obituaries and Death Notices

GARY C. CUNNINGHAM - Youngstown Vindicator

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Crooks, all of Deerfield; and 10 grandchildren, Garrett, Allison, Santana, Eric, Jesse, Justin, Jaidyn, Spencer, Elizabeth, and Dominic. Gary also leaves two brothers, Dick (Judy) Cunningham of Amsterdam and Bob (Dee) Cunningham of Winter Haven, Fla.; one sister, Kay (Jim) Mills of Austintown; as well as his brother-in-law, Ralph (Mary) Dixon and sister-in-law Vickie Schrader, both of Austintown; and several nieces, nephews and many honorary grandchildren. Family and friends may call from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday and again from 9 to 10 a.m. on Saturday at the Lane Family Funeral Homes, Austintown Chapel, where services will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donation be made to the Deerfield Evangelical Friends Church for the youth activities in Gary?s name. Family and friends may visit www.lanefuneralhomes.com to view this obituary and send condolences.

Lolis Elie, Lawyer Who Helped Desegregate New Orleans, Dies at 87 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

In one instance he was the star witness in a lawsuit against Louisiana’s ban on out-of-state lawyers representing criminal defendants. Anthony G. Amsterdam, an emeritus professor at the New York University School of Law, who was a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee, recalled Mr. Elie’s powerful testimony.“On cross-examination,” Professor Amsterdam wrote in an email, “the state’s attorney was dumb enough to ask him: ‘Mr. Elie, is it not true that the condition of Negroes in the State of Louisiana has improved during the past five years?’ Lolis said, ‘Yes, but … ’ And then went on to give a two-hour answer that was easily the finest, most fiery civil-rights speech I have ever heard — in court, in church, or anywhere else.”“The judges were enthralled,” the professor continued. “They sat there drinking it all in. They didn’t even call a break for lunch when the usual lunchtime hour came in the middle of his answer.”Mr. Elie was born in New Orleans, a block from the Mississippi River, on Jan. 9, 1930, according to his family. (His birth certificate says Feb. 9, 1928, but the family believes it is incorrect.)His father, Theophile, was a truck driver who did not encourage his son to continue his education beyond the Gilbert Academy, a Methodist high school. His mother, the former Mary Elizabeth Villere, worked part time as a maid.Mr. Elie spent six months as a merchant seaman before landing in New York, where he shined shoes and delivered stationery by subway. He was drafted and inducted into the Army in mid-1951 (the Army had been desegregated in 1948). He was trained as a clerk-typist and befriended by an Italian-American soldier who had also felt the sting of discrimination and who urged Mr. Elie to one day get a law degree, as he had.“The desegregation of the armed services is possibly one of the most significant things that has happened in this country,” Mr. Elie told Robert Penn Warren in “Who Speaks for the Negro?” (1965).He enrolled in Howard University on the G.I. Bill before transferring to Dillard University in New Orleans, from which he graduated. He went on to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans shortly after the school had been desegregated.His marriage to the former Gerri Moore, a school principal and university professor, ended in divorce. In addition to their son, who was a columnist for The Times-Picayune of New Orleans and story editor for the HBO drama “Treme,” he is survived by their daughter, Dr. Migel Elizabeth Elie; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.With his two black law partners, Nils R. Douglas and Robert F. Collins, Mr. Elie represented the Consumers’ League of Greater New Orleans in its 1960 boycott of white store owne...

Jo Ann Stubbins, 67 - The Free Press Standard

Monday, March 27, 2017

Ann enjoyed going to Roger’s Sale for the flea market and auctions. She collected movies on DVD. She was an animal lover and enjoyed jigsaw puzzles.She is survived by her mother Rachael V. Noble of Amsterdam; her companion, Carl Lewis of Dellroy; a son, Dwane E. (Jennifer) Hasseman of Mineral City; a daughter, Teresa Morgan of Carrollton; a brother, John L. (Betty) Stubbins of Urichsville; a sister, Judy Edmonds of Amsterdam; six grandchildren, Damean ,Dezire and Doniven Hasseman, Hunter and Chantz Morgan, Kylee Haas and Kaitlyn Tucker ; and six nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death was her father and a daughter, Cathy Sue Hasseman.Graveside service will be held April 6 at 3:30 p.m. in Baxter’s Ridge Cemetery.Allmon-Dugger-Cotton Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.

Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Minnesota musical giant, dead at 93 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, February 27, 2017

Getting him out of Poland required a little bit of strategy,” said Dick Cisek, a friend and former orchestra administrator. In 1959, Skrowaczewski and his wife, Krystyna, escaped to Amsterdam by train.Cisek got the phone call: “His first words were, ‘We are free!’?”His early performances with the orchestra earned accolades like these, in the Minneapolis Star: “The highest praise one musician can give another sounds like an understatement to the layman: ‘He is musical,’ [the musicians] say, and that means everything.“They add that he’s efficient without sweat or strain or temperament, that he has a natural and innate courtesy and that — another understatement — he ‘lets them play.’?”A rare combinationStan and Krystyna moved in 1963 to Wayzata, where they raised three children: Anna, Paul and Nicholas. In the basement studio of their white midcentury house, he studied scores and composed works of his own.“He calls it the conflict of his lifetime, composing vs. conducting,” one article noted. From 1947 to 2010, he wrote and published 30 orchestral works, chamber music, transcriptions and arrangements. Two were shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize: Passacaglia Immaginaria (1995) and Concerto for Orchestra (1999).“At his heart, he was a composer,” said his biographer Harris. “That combination was so incredibly rare. You can count on one hand the great composers who were also great conductors.”Partly because he was a composer, Skrowaczewski possessed a deep and profound knowledge of a score, a mastery of its “pacing, architecture, emotional content,” said Anthony Ross, the Minnesota Orchestra’s principal cello. His conducting was subtle yet powerful, Ross said. “There might be a moment where he tilted his head toward the cello section, and I knew the minute he did that, he was looking for a little more cello sound in the balance of that harmony.”He conducted scores from memory — partly because of poor eyesight — but always felt there was more to learn. Skrowaczewski would show up at Orchestra Hall on days he wasn’t conducting, said Ross, who has been with the ensemble since 1988.“He would come up to me, wanting to discuss the bowings of a certain phrase he might be conducting in Japan the next week,” Ross said. “In his 90s, he was still searching and curious and alive.”In all, he conducted nearly 5,000 concerts, regularly leading the world’s top orchestras. That lively guest-conducting career gained momentum in his later years. Both in Japan, where he had become a kind of rock star, and Minneapolis, he sold out concerts and earned lingering ovations.He kept writing, too. After his wife died in 2011, Skrowaczewski wrote her an elegy, performed by six string players at her funeral. He had been working on an orchestral version of that piece, as well as a wordless, nonreligious requiem for civilization.That project came from his belief that art is necessary for a healthy society — and his concern...

A Rising Black Leader Who Pulled Off His Own Fake Obituary - New York Times

Monday, February 27, 2017

Or was he?Mr. O’Cummings was not quite the determined political up-and-comer that he seemed. He had faked his death and was very much alive when he bamboozled The Times and The Amsterdam News into publishing his obituary.In fact, this report might well also serve as the newspaper’s long overdue correction. For it was only during the reporting for this article that The Times realized it had written of Mr. O’Cummings’s hoax.This is what actually happened.Just four months after he sent in his obituary to The Times, he re-emerged — at a news conference in Brooklyn, which went unnoticed by The Times. For an explanation of why he faked his death, Mr. O’Cummings said he had simply been trying to elude members of the Black Panthers, who he said had made death threats against him and his family, according to an article about the news conference in The Amsterdam News.“I had to get out because I was trying to protect my family,” The News quoted Mr. O’Cummings as saying. He explained that he had fled to Buffalo, where he remained for months. “My wife, Winnie, was assaulted by four Black Panthers, and it made me very angry. I didn’t go to the police because I am not an informer and didn’t want to get involved.”The News’s account never explained why he had decided that the threat to his family had diminished enough in just four months for him to re-emerge, and in such public and dramatic fashion.Perhaps at least partly because he had misled the public, he never attained the political success he sought.Years before, Mr. O’Cummings’s presidential run had proved to be as short-lived as his faked death. In early March 1964, about five months after he was designated the presidential candidate of his National Civil Rights Party, he withdrew and said he would become his party’s candidate for the seat held by Representative John J. Rooney, a Democrat, in Brooklyn’s 14th Congressional District (as reported by The Times in a brief article).Several decades later, The Times did mention Mr. O’Cummings and his candidacy for City Council, in an article about the 1993 race. Even then, though, the newspaper did not correct the story of his death or run an editor’s note about it.Professionally, Mr. O’Cummings worked in public relations, including as the community relations representative for the Welfare Policemen’s Benevolent Association. He was a native of Greenville, S.C., who graduated from City College of New York. Mr. O’Cummings also was publisher of New York Speakout, a weekly ne...

Author William Melvin Kelley passes at 79 - Amsterdam News

Monday, February 20, 2017

Sarah Lawrence College twice a week.Born Nov. 1, 1937, Kelley was the son of William Melvin Kelley Sr. who was an editor at the Amsterdam News from 1922 to 1934. He grew up in the North Bronx and attended Fieldston School in Riverdale. As a student at Harvard University in 1956, his aim was to become a lawyer, but his gift as a storyteller was hard to suppress and he switched his major to English. Under the guidance of John Hawkes and poet Archibald McLeish, Kelley burnished his writing skills, and his short story “The Poker Party” won Harvard’s Dana Reed Prize. So strong was the compulsion to write that he left Harvard six months short of a degree and devoted himself to writing full time, an activity that resulted in his first novel, “A Different Drummer,” in 1962. Two years later, “Dancers on the Shore,” a collection of short stories, was published. And this book was followed in 1965 by “A Drop of Patience.”This second novel arrived almost simultaneously with the assassination of Malcolm X, and Kelley secured an assignment to cover the subsequent trials of the accused. The ordeal had a tremendous impact on him, so much so that within two years he and his family moved to Paris. “Dem,” his third novel, published in 1967, to a large extent tropes the turbulent race relations of the period, with a large dose of surrealism. “The narrator of ‘Dem’ is Mitchell Pierce, a white man, whose wife, Tam, surprises him by bearing fraternal twins, one white and one Black,” critic Robert Fleming wrote in the “Oxford Companion to African-American Literature.” Pierce explores Harlem looking for his wife’s African-American lover. For the most part, the novel is a symbiosis of Black and white rel...

The Friends and Other Stars Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher Will Join at Legendary LA Cemetery - PEOPLE.com

Monday, January 16, 2017

Latino stand-up comedian and Chico and the Man star, who is also the father of actor Freddie Prinze Jr.Albert Broccoli, the producer behind beloved movies of the James Bond franchise.Morey Amsterdam, the character actor best known as Buddy on The Dick Van Dyke Show.Isabel Sanford, who played the wife of George Jefferson in the hit 1970s sitcom The Jeffersons.Ann Harding, who was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress in 1930 for her performance in the film Holiday.Rod Steiger, the Academy Award-winner, known for his roles in , The Pawnbroker, Oklahoma! and In the Heat of the Night, among others.Sandra Dee, a teen icon in the ’50s and ’60s, who later became known for her mention in the popular Grease musical song, “Look At Me, I’m Sandra Dee.”Michael Clarke Duncan, the powerful — in both stature and skill — actor who stole hearts as the friendly giant alongside Tom Hanks in the drama The Green Mile.McLean Stevenson, the comic actor known as Colonel Henry Blake in the popular show M*A*S*H.Lou Rawls, the Grammy winner who crooned his way to fame with hits like “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine” and “Lady Love.”Andy Gibb, the youngest brother in the Bee Gees, who also had several solo hits like “Shadow Dancing” and “Everlasting Love.”Tom Bosley, who played Howard Cunningham in the beloved 1950s sitcom Happy Days.Buster Keaton, the silent film star who was at the helm of films including The General, The Navigator and Sherlock Jr.Marty Feldman, who was Gene Wilder’s right-hand man as the hunchback in Mel Brooks’ 1974 comedy Young Frankenstein.Bob Kane, the comic who brought Batman to life in the 1930s.John Ritter, best known as Jack Tripper in Three’s Company and later, as the strict patriarch in the early 2000s sitcom 8 Simple Rules.Steve Allen, regarded as the first talk show host as he was the inaugural host of The Tonight Show in 1959.Paul Walker, who starred in the Fast & Furious film franchise until his tragic death.David Carrandine, the actor who starred in the Kung Fu and made several appearances as the title role in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill films. Brittany Murphy, who became famous — and adored — for her role as Tai in Clueless and went on to star in other films, including Uptown Girls and Eminem’s 8 Mile, among others.Ricky Nelson, the chart-topper who was popular for hits like “Fools Rush In” and “Hello, Mary Lou.”Jack Soo, the comic actor best known as Detective Nick Yemana in the popular 1970s sitcom Barney Miller.Gene Autry, the singing cowboy known for his roles in countless Western films from the 1930s-1950s.Bob Barker, the beloved and longtime game show host of The Price Is Right is not dead — but his grave stone is prepared at the legendary cemetery.

Holocaust hero Marion Pritchard remembered in Vermont - vtdigger.org

Monday, January 16, 2017

Vershire from 1976 to 2006, learned different and more difficult lessons growing up in her native Netherlands. The former Marion Philippina van Binsbergen was a student at the University of Amsterdam School of Social Work when, riding her bicycle in 1942, she witnessed Nazi soldiers pulling Jewish children from their homes.Marion Pritchard in her United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration uniform in 1946. Photo from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum“It was a street I had known since I had been born, and all of a sudden you see little kids picked up by their pigtails or by a leg and thrown over the side of a truck,” she told the author of the book “Voices from the Holocaust.” “You stop but you can’t believe it.”Pritchard saw two passersby attempt to stop the action, only to be seized. That’s when, raised by a father who opposed Nazi ideology and a mother who supported social justice, she decided to fight.Pritchard would feed, clothe, hide or obtain false identification papers for as many as 150 Dutch Jews, according to obituaries in The New York Times and The Washington Post. She also met, by chance, the German-born diarist Anne Frank before the girl went into hiding.Kunin recalls Pritchard telling her about smuggling Jewish babies out of Amsterdam by declaring herself to be their unwed mother.In her most extreme example of heroism, Pritchard hid a Jewish father and his three children for nearly three years, only to have police arrive to search the house. Not seeing the family under the floorboards, the authorities left before, to everyone’s surprise, one returned. Pritchard grabbed a gun and fatally shot the officer, then snuck his body to a friend at a funeral home who buried it in someone else’s coffin.Onetime Vermonter Marion Pritchard receives the University of Michigan’s 1996 Wallenberg Medal for her commitment to human rights and humanitaria...

Hurray for the Riff Raff Announces New LP 'The Navigator' - Glide Magazine

Monday, January 02, 2017

FinaleTour dates:January 18 - London UK – Sebright ArmsJanuary 19 - Newcastle UK – Cluny 2January 20 – Glasgow UK – Celtic Connections at DrygateJanuary 21- Bristol UK – The LanternJanuary 24 - Amsterdam ML – Paradiso, UpstairsMarch 20 - Leeds – BrudenellMarch 21 - Manchester UK – Deaf InstituteMarch 22 - London UK – The DomeMarch 23 - Winchester UK – The Railway InnMarch 25 - Brighton UK – Sticky MikesMarch 28 – Brussels BE – RotondeMarch 29 – Hamburg DE – HakkenMarch 30 – Berlin DE – Gruener SalonMarch 31 – Munich DE  – MillaApril 2 – Munster DE – American Series – PumpenhausApril 3 – Rotterdam NL – RotownApril 4 – Utrecht NL – EKKOApril 5 – Groningen NL –VeraApril 15 – Middlebury, VT –Middlebury CollegeApril 16 - Northampton, MA – Academy of MusicApril 18 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 19 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 20 – New York, NY – Bowery BallroomApril 21 – Philadelphia, PA – World Café (downstairs)April 23 – Washington, DC – 9:30 ClubApril 24 – Cincinnati, OH – Woodward TheaterApril 25 – Cleveland, OH – Beachland BallroomApril 27 – Detroit, MI – Magic BagApril 28 – Chicago, IL – Thalia HallApril 29 – Madison, WI – High Noon SaloonApril 30 – Minneapolis, MN – Fine Line Music CaféMay 2 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock HouseMay 3 – Nashville, TN – Mercy LoungeMay 4 – Birmingham, AL – The SaturnMay 5 – New Orleans, LA – Civic Theatre*All US dates w/Ron GalloThis article passed through the Full-Text RSS service - if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Recommended article: The Guardian's Summary of Julian Assange's Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Judy D. Wagner, 65 - The Free Press Standard

Monday, December 19, 2016

Judy D. Wagner, 65Judy Dianne Wagner, 65, of Amsterdam passed away in her residence Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016.Born June 30, 1951, in Martins Ferry, OH, she was a daughter to Albert William and Wanda Virginia (Kirkpatrick) Wright.Judy was a loving homemaker and a member of Carrollton Bible Chapel Church.She is survived by her husband of 43 years, Ronald K. Wagner, whom she married Jan. 10, 1969; her father; two brothers, Bill Wright of Cadiz and Chris Wright of Harlem Springs; and a sister, Sonya Smith of Minerva.She was preceded in death by a son, Christopher Wagner; a sister, Carol Sue Spicer; and her mother.Funeral services will be held Dec. 14 at 11 a.m. in Carrollton Bible Church in Carrollton with Rev. Chuck Wilson officiating. Burial will follow in Harlem Springs Cemetery. Calling hours will be one hour before the time of service at the church.Allmon-Dugger-Cotton Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

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GARY C. CUNNINGHAM - Youngstown Vindicator

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Crooks, all of Deerfield; and 10 grandchildren, Garrett, Allison, Santana, Eric, Jesse, Justin, Jaidyn, Spencer, Elizabeth, and Dominic. Gary also leaves two brothers, Dick (Judy) Cunningham of Amsterdam and Bob (Dee) Cunningham of Winter Haven, Fla.; one sister, Kay (Jim) Mills of Austintown; as well as his brother-in-law, Ralph (Mary) Dixon and sister-in-law Vickie Schrader, both of Austintown; and several nieces, nephews and many honorary grandchildren. Family and friends may call from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday and again from 9 to 10 a.m. on Saturday at the Lane Family Funeral Homes, Austintown Chapel, where services will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donation be made to the Deerfield Evangelical Friends Church for the youth activities in Gary?s name. Family and friends may visit www.lanefuneralhomes.com to view this obituary and send condolences.

Lolis Elie, Lawyer Who Helped Desegregate New Orleans, Dies at 87 - New York Times

Saturday, April 08, 2017

In one instance he was the star witness in a lawsuit against Louisiana’s ban on out-of-state lawyers representing criminal defendants. Anthony G. Amsterdam, an emeritus professor at the New York University School of Law, who was a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee, recalled Mr. Elie’s powerful testimony.“On cross-examination,” Professor Amsterdam wrote in an email, “the state’s attorney was dumb enough to ask him: ‘Mr. Elie, is it not true that the condition of Negroes in the State of Louisiana has improved during the past five years?’ Lolis said, ‘Yes, but … ’ And then went on to give a two-hour answer that was easily the finest, most fiery civil-rights speech I have ever heard — in court, in church, or anywhere else.”“The judges were enthralled,” the professor continued. “They sat there drinking it all in. They didn’t even call a break for lunch when the usual lunchtime hour came in the middle of his answer.”Mr. Elie was born in New Orleans, a block from the Mississippi River, on Jan. 9, 1930, according to his family. (His birth certificate says Feb. 9, 1928, but the family believes it is incorrect.)His father, Theophile, was a truck driver who did not encourage his son to continue his education beyond the Gilbert Academy, a Methodist high school. His mother, the former Mary Elizabeth Villere, worked part time as a maid.Mr. Elie spent six months as a merchant seaman before landing in New York, where he shined shoes and delivered stationery by subway. He was drafted and inducted into the Army in mid-1951 (the Army had been desegregated in 1948). He was trained as a clerk-typist and befriended by an Italian-American soldier who had also felt the sting of discrimination and who urged Mr. Elie to one day get a law degree, as he had.“The desegregation of the armed services is possibly one of the most significant things that has happened in this country,” Mr. Elie told Robert Penn Warren in “Who Speaks for the Negro?” (1965).He enrolled in Howard University on the G.I. Bill before transferring to Dillard University in New Orleans, from which he graduated. He went on to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans shortly after the school had been desegregated.His marriage to the former Gerri Moore, a school principal and university professor, ended in divorce. In addition to their son, who was a columnist for The Times-Picayune of New Orleans and story editor for the HBO drama “Treme,” he is survived by their daughter, Dr. Migel Elizabeth Elie; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.With his two black law partners, Nils R. Douglas and Robert F. Collins, Mr. Elie represented the Consumers’ League of Greater New Orleans in its 1960 boycott of white store owne...

Jo Ann Stubbins, 67 - The Free Press Standard

Monday, March 27, 2017

Ann enjoyed going to Roger’s Sale for the flea market and auctions. She collected movies on DVD. She was an animal lover and enjoyed jigsaw puzzles.She is survived by her mother Rachael V. Noble of Amsterdam; her companion, Carl Lewis of Dellroy; a son, Dwane E. (Jennifer) Hasseman of Mineral City; a daughter, Teresa Morgan of Carrollton; a brother, John L. (Betty) Stubbins of Urichsville; a sister, Judy Edmonds of Amsterdam; six grandchildren, Damean ,Dezire and Doniven Hasseman, Hunter and Chantz Morgan, Kylee Haas and Kaitlyn Tucker ; and six nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death was her father and a daughter, Cathy Sue Hasseman.Graveside service will be held April 6 at 3:30 p.m. in Baxter’s Ridge Cemetery.Allmon-Dugger-Cotton Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.

Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Minnesota musical giant, dead at 93 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, February 27, 2017

Getting him out of Poland required a little bit of strategy,” said Dick Cisek, a friend and former orchestra administrator. In 1959, Skrowaczewski and his wife, Krystyna, escaped to Amsterdam by train.Cisek got the phone call: “His first words were, ‘We are free!’?”His early performances with the orchestra earned accolades like these, in the Minneapolis Star: “The highest praise one musician can give another sounds like an understatement to the layman: ‘He is musical,’ [the musicians] say, and that means everything.“They add that he’s efficient without sweat or strain or temperament, that he has a natural and innate courtesy and that — another understatement — he ‘lets them play.’?”A rare combinationStan and Krystyna moved in 1963 to Wayzata, where they raised three children: Anna, Paul and Nicholas. In the basement studio of their white midcentury house, he studied scores and composed works of his own.“He calls it the conflict of his lifetime, composing vs. conducting,” one article noted. From 1947 to 2010, he wrote and published 30 orchestral works, chamber music, transcriptions and arrangements. Two were shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize: Passacaglia Immaginaria (1995) and Concerto for Orchestra (1999).“At his heart, he was a composer,” said his biographer Harris. “That combination was so incredibly rare. You can count on one hand the great composers who were also great conductors.”Partly because he was a composer, Skrowaczewski possessed a deep and profound knowledge of a score, a mastery of its “pacing, architecture, emotional content,” said Anthony Ross, the Minnesota Orchestra’s principal cello. His conducting was subtle yet powerful, Ross said. “There might be a moment where he tilted his head toward the cello section, and I knew the minute he did that, he was looking for a little more cello sound in the balance of that harmony.”He conducted scores from memory — partly because of poor eyesight — but always felt there was more to learn. Skrowaczewski would show up at Orchestra Hall on days he wasn’t conducting, said Ross, who has been with the ensemble since 1988.“He would come up to me, wanting to discuss the bowings of a certain phrase he might be conducting in Japan the next week,” Ross said. “In his 90s, he was still searching and curious and alive.”In all, he conducted nearly 5,000 concerts, regularly leading the world’s top orchestras. That lively guest-conducting career gained momentum in his later years. Both in Japan, where he had become a kind of rock star, and Minneapolis, he sold out concerts and earned lingering ovations.He kept writing, too. After his wife died in 2011, Skrowaczewski wrote her an elegy, performed by six string players at her funeral. He had been working on an orchestral version of that piece, as well as a wordless, nonreligious requiem for civilization.That project came from his belief that art is necessary for a healthy society — and his concern...

A Rising Black Leader Who Pulled Off His Own Fake Obituary - New York Times

Monday, February 27, 2017

Or was he?Mr. O’Cummings was not quite the determined political up-and-comer that he seemed. He had faked his death and was very much alive when he bamboozled The Times and The Amsterdam News into publishing his obituary.In fact, this report might well also serve as the newspaper’s long overdue correction. For it was only during the reporting for this article that The Times realized it had written of Mr. O’Cummings’s hoax.This is what actually happened.Just four months after he sent in his obituary to The Times, he re-emerged — at a news conference in Brooklyn, which went unnoticed by The Times. For an explanation of why he faked his death, Mr. O’Cummings said he had simply been trying to elude members of the Black Panthers, who he said had made death threats against him and his family, according to an article about the news conference in The Amsterdam News.“I had to get out because I was trying to protect my family,” The News quoted Mr. O’Cummings as saying. He explained that he had fled to Buffalo, where he remained for months. “My wife, Winnie, was assaulted by four Black Panthers, and it made me very angry. I didn’t go to the police because I am not an informer and didn’t want to get involved.”The News’s account never explained why he had decided that the threat to his family had diminished enough in just four months for him to re-emerge, and in such public and dramatic fashion.Perhaps at least partly because he had misled the public, he never attained the political success he sought.Years before, Mr. O’Cummings’s presidential run had proved to be as short-lived as his faked death. In early March 1964, about five months after he was designated the presidential candidate of his National Civil Rights Party, he withdrew and said he would become his party’s candidate for the seat held by Representative John J. Rooney, a Democrat, in Brooklyn’s 14th Congressional District (as reported by The Times in a brief article).Several decades later, The Times did mention Mr. O’Cummings and his candidacy for City Council, in an article about the 1993 race. Even then, though, the newspaper did not correct the story of his death or run an editor’s note about it.Professionally, Mr. O’Cummings worked in public relations, including as the community relations representative for the Welfare Policemen’s Benevolent Association. He was a native of Greenville, S.C., who graduated from City College of New York. Mr. O’Cummings also was publisher of New York Speakout, a weekly ne...

Author William Melvin Kelley passes at 79 - Amsterdam News

Monday, February 20, 2017

Sarah Lawrence College twice a week.Born Nov. 1, 1937, Kelley was the son of William Melvin Kelley Sr. who was an editor at the Amsterdam News from 1922 to 1934. He grew up in the North Bronx and attended Fieldston School in Riverdale. As a student at Harvard University in 1956, his aim was to become a lawyer, but his gift as a storyteller was hard to suppress and he switched his major to English. Under the guidance of John Hawkes and poet Archibald McLeish, Kelley burnished his writing skills, and his short story “The Poker Party” won Harvard’s Dana Reed Prize. So strong was the compulsion to write that he left Harvard six months short of a degree and devoted himself to writing full time, an activity that resulted in his first novel, “A Different Drummer,” in 1962. Two years later, “Dancers on the Shore,” a collection of short stories, was published. And this book was followed in 1965 by “A Drop of Patience.”This second novel arrived almost simultaneously with the assassination of Malcolm X, and Kelley secured an assignment to cover the subsequent trials of the accused. The ordeal had a tremendous impact on him, so much so that within two years he and his family moved to Paris. “Dem,” his third novel, published in 1967, to a large extent tropes the turbulent race relations of the period, with a large dose of surrealism. “The narrator of ‘Dem’ is Mitchell Pierce, a white man, whose wife, Tam, surprises him by bearing fraternal twins, one white and one Black,” critic Robert Fleming wrote in the “Oxford Companion to African-American Literature.” Pierce explores Harlem looking for his wife’s African-American lover. For the most part, the novel is a symbiosis of Black and white rel...

The Friends and Other Stars Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher Will Join at Legendary LA Cemetery - PEOPLE.com

Monday, January 16, 2017

Latino stand-up comedian and Chico and the Man star, who is also the father of actor Freddie Prinze Jr.Albert Broccoli, the producer behind beloved movies of the James Bond franchise.Morey Amsterdam, the character actor best known as Buddy on The Dick Van Dyke Show.Isabel Sanford, who played the wife of George Jefferson in the hit 1970s sitcom The Jeffersons.Ann Harding, who was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress in 1930 for her performance in the film Holiday.Rod Steiger, the Academy Award-winner, known for his roles in , The Pawnbroker, Oklahoma! and In the Heat of the Night, among others.Sandra Dee, a teen icon in the ’50s and ’60s, who later became known for her mention in the popular Grease musical song, “Look At Me, I’m Sandra Dee.”Michael Clarke Duncan, the powerful — in both stature and skill — actor who stole hearts as the friendly giant alongside Tom Hanks in the drama The Green Mile.McLean Stevenson, the comic actor known as Colonel Henry Blake in the popular show M*A*S*H.Lou Rawls, the Grammy winner who crooned his way to fame with hits like “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine” and “Lady Love.”Andy Gibb, the youngest brother in the Bee Gees, who also had several solo hits like “Shadow Dancing” and “Everlasting Love.”Tom Bosley, who played Howard Cunningham in the beloved 1950s sitcom Happy Days.Buster Keaton, the silent film star who was at the helm of films including The General, The Navigator and Sherlock Jr.Marty Feldman, who was Gene Wilder’s right-hand man as the hunchback in Mel Brooks’ 1974 comedy Young Frankenstein.Bob Kane, the comic who brought Batman to life in the 1930s.John Ritter, best known as Jack Tripper in Three’s Company and later, as the strict patriarch in the early 2000s sitcom 8 Simple Rules.Steve Allen, regarded as the first talk show host as he was the inaugural host of The Tonight Show in 1959.Paul Walker, who starred in the Fast & Furious film franchise until his tragic death.David Carrandine, the actor who starred in the Kung Fu and made several appearances as the title role in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill films. Brittany Murphy, who became famous — and adored — for her role as Tai in Clueless and went on to star in other films, including Uptown Girls and Eminem’s 8 Mile, among others.Ricky Nelson, the chart-topper who was popular for hits like “Fools Rush In” and “Hello, Mary Lou.”Jack Soo, the comic actor best known as Detective Nick Yemana in the popular 1970s sitcom Barney Miller.Gene Autry, the singing cowboy known for his roles in countless Western films from the 1930s-1950s.Bob Barker, the beloved and longtime game show host of The Price Is Right is not dead — but his grave stone is prepared at the legendary cemetery.

Holocaust hero Marion Pritchard remembered in Vermont - vtdigger.org

Monday, January 16, 2017

Vershire from 1976 to 2006, learned different and more difficult lessons growing up in her native Netherlands. The former Marion Philippina van Binsbergen was a student at the University of Amsterdam School of Social Work when, riding her bicycle in 1942, she witnessed Nazi soldiers pulling Jewish children from their homes.Marion Pritchard in her United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration uniform in 1946. Photo from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum“It was a street I had known since I had been born, and all of a sudden you see little kids picked up by their pigtails or by a leg and thrown over the side of a truck,” she told the author of the book “Voices from the Holocaust.” “You stop but you can’t believe it.”Pritchard saw two passersby attempt to stop the action, only to be seized. That’s when, raised by a father who opposed Nazi ideology and a mother who supported social justice, she decided to fight.Pritchard would feed, clothe, hide or obtain false identification papers for as many as 150 Dutch Jews, according to obituaries in The New York Times and The Washington Post. She also met, by chance, the German-born diarist Anne Frank before the girl went into hiding.Kunin recalls Pritchard telling her about smuggling Jewish babies out of Amsterdam by declaring herself to be their unwed mother.In her most extreme example of heroism, Pritchard hid a Jewish father and his three children for nearly three years, only to have police arrive to search the house. Not seeing the family under the floorboards, the authorities left before, to everyone’s surprise, one returned. Pritchard grabbed a gun and fatally shot the officer, then snuck his body to a friend at a funeral home who buried it in someone else’s coffin.Onetime Vermonter Marion Pritchard receives the University of Michigan’s 1996 Wallenberg Medal for her commitment to human rights and humanitaria...

Hurray for the Riff Raff Announces New LP 'The Navigator' - Glide Magazine

Monday, January 02, 2017

FinaleTour dates:January 18 - London UK – Sebright ArmsJanuary 19 - Newcastle UK – Cluny 2January 20 – Glasgow UK – Celtic Connections at DrygateJanuary 21- Bristol UK – The LanternJanuary 24 - Amsterdam ML – Paradiso, UpstairsMarch 20 - Leeds – BrudenellMarch 21 - Manchester UK – Deaf InstituteMarch 22 - London UK – The DomeMarch 23 - Winchester UK – The Railway InnMarch 25 - Brighton UK – Sticky MikesMarch 28 – Brussels BE – RotondeMarch 29 – Hamburg DE – HakkenMarch 30 – Berlin DE – Gruener SalonMarch 31 – Munich DE  – MillaApril 2 – Munster DE – American Series – PumpenhausApril 3 – Rotterdam NL – RotownApril 4 – Utrecht NL – EKKOApril 5 – Groningen NL –VeraApril 15 – Middlebury, VT –Middlebury CollegeApril 16 - Northampton, MA – Academy of MusicApril 18 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 19 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 20 – New York, NY – Bowery BallroomApril 21 – Philadelphia, PA – World Café (downstairs)April 23 – Washington, DC – 9:30 ClubApril 24 – Cincinnati, OH – Woodward TheaterApril 25 – Cleveland, OH – Beachland BallroomApril 27 – Detroit, MI – Magic BagApril 28 – Chicago, IL – Thalia HallApril 29 – Madison, WI – High Noon SaloonApril 30 – Minneapolis, MN – Fine Line Music CaféMay 2 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock HouseMay 3 – Nashville, TN – Mercy LoungeMay 4 – Birmingham, AL – The SaturnMay 5 – New Orleans, LA – Civic Theatre*All US dates w/Ron GalloThis article passed through the Full-Text RSS service - if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Recommended article: The Guardian's Summary of Julian Assange's Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Judy D. Wagner, 65 - The Free Press Standard

Monday, December 19, 2016

Judy D. Wagner, 65Judy Dianne Wagner, 65, of Amsterdam passed away in her residence Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016.Born June 30, 1951, in Martins Ferry, OH, she was a daughter to Albert William and Wanda Virginia (Kirkpatrick) Wright.Judy was a loving homemaker and a member of Carrollton Bible Chapel Church.She is survived by her husband of 43 years, Ronald K. Wagner, whom she married Jan. 10, 1969; her father; two brothers, Bill Wright of Cadiz and Chris Wright of Harlem Springs; and a sister, Sonya Smith of Minerva.She was preceded in death by a son, Christopher Wagner; a sister, Carol Sue Spicer; and her mother.Funeral services will be held Dec. 14 at 11 a.m. in Carrollton Bible Church in Carrollton with Rev. Chuck Wilson officiating. Burial will follow in Harlem Springs Cemetery. Calling hours will be one hour before the time of service at the church.Allmon-Dugger-Cotton Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.