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Moloney's Bohemia Funeral Home

1320 Lakeland Avenue
Bohemia, NY 11716
(631) 589-1500
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Bohemia NY Obituaries and Death Notices

The last hours of Oakland's Ghost Ship warehouse - The Mercury News

Monday, December 26, 2016

Ship warehouse, and on that Friday night, he was also the doorman.He had spent the day getting ready for an electronic music party upstairs, arranging the sound system and cleaning up the fantastical bohemian space where he and about two dozen of his fellow artists lived. Before 9 p.m., the lanky jewelry maker with a scraggly beard and crescent tattoo on his cheekbone began welcoming visitors. They arrived in small groups, more than 100 guests in all from a tight-knit music and art scene — a transgender barista, a 35-year-old therapist who helped at-risk kids, a father of twin daughters, a couple in their 20s, he with a pencil-thin mustache, she with green glitter sparkling on her cheeks.As they entered this one-of-a-kind sanctuary to Oakland’s creative culture, they followed the pulsating beat to the second floor, up the single-file staircase made of scrap wood and pallet planks to a dance party promising good vibes and good friends.Max Ohr, a jewelry maker and Ghost Ship resident, who served as doorman the night of the fire. (Dai Sugano/Bay Area News Group) “I greeted almost every single person who walked through that door,” said Ohr, 26, “and I’m usually the one who says goodbye to them at the end of the night as well.”On this night, he would be screaming for them to escape.On this night, Ohr would be the doorman to an epic tragedy, Oakland’s deadliest fire ever.This was no natural disaster, no eart...

Ann Tower, influential Lexington gallery owner and artist, has died - Lexington Herald Leader

Monday, November 14, 2016

Kentucky in 1969.In a 1994 profile, she told the Herald-Leader that the department was “really in its heyday. There weren’t the budget cuts you see today. There were lots of visiting artists, a very bohemian feel. I just loved it.”She and Tharsing married in 1973, and Tower earned her master’s degree in fine arts in 1975. The family spent summers in Nova Scotia, on islands off the coast, and Tower said that fueled her art.“Unless you’re painting, you’re always so busy. ... Who’d have time to look at a view for hours and hours, or even days?” she said. “It’s wonderful to be out in nature.”Tower’s gallery ownership and management included co-founding and directing the Hackley Gallery in Winchester from 1995 to ’98. She said that helped her develop an expertise in folk art, and she then ran the Tower Cerlan Gallery with Gayle Cerlan.But her highest-profile venture was her own gallery, which opened in 2002 at the Downtown Arts Center. On several occasions, Tower said that she assumed there would be tough competition for the then-two-level Main Street space. But it turned out she was the only bidder for the spot. In a 2002 story, she said opening the gallery was her biggest success.When management of the Downtown Arts Center was transferred from LexArts to the cultural arts division of Lexington Parks and Recreation, the city elected to make the lower level of the gallery a public gallery, but Tower retained the second-floor space. She closed out 2014 with a retrospective show for the last Gallery Hop with the two-level gallery.Nan Plummer, president and CEO of LexArts, said Tower “will be terribly missed.”“We’re a city that’s in love with the arts, but there are relatively few commercial galleries, because it’s a very hard business,” she said. “Ann brought such grace” to a competitive business. She was never anything but lovely.”In 2015, she and her family celebrated Robert Tharsing’s first solo exhibit in New York City, just a few months before his death in December after a long battle with cancer.In his obituary, Tower said, “We’ve had such a wonderful life.”“Their lives were just all about the art they were making and the art they wanted to make,” said Lexington photographer Guy Mendes, a friend of Tower since they were students at UK. She later represented his work.“Ann did a lot for a lot of artists,” Mendes said. “She’s been an advocate.”Lina Tharsing said she hopes to continue the gallery downtown, but its future will depend on the artists Tower represented and whether they wish to continue.She described her mother as “an extremely exuberant woman” who was unusually accepting and understanding of others.“She was just an incredible optimist in that way,” she said. “She saw the best in everyone, and that just made her a pleasure to be around.”Lina Tharsing and Tower had been working with the Lexington Art League on a re...

Stepanek, Victor C., Sr. - Omaha World-Herald

Monday, November 07, 2016

Marty (Sandy); granddaughters, Shelby and Carly; sister Jane Vandeventer; nieces; nephews. VISITATION begins Tuesday at 4pm at the Mortuary. FUNERAL Wednesday at 11am at Mortuary. Interment, Bohemian Cemetery. Memorials to the family. KORISKO LARKIN STASKIEWICZ FUNERAL HOME 5108 "F" St. 402-731-1234 www.klsfuneralhome.com...

Arts|Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor Dies at 79; Celebrated Gullah Food and Culture - New York Times

Monday, September 26, 2016

Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recalled in an oral history interview for Tulane University in 1992. “We ate rice.”Growing up, she read about and became fascinated by the Beat Generation’s bohemian lives and Josephine Baker’s success in Paris. At 19, inspired and encouraged, Ms. Smart moved to Paris, having saved enough money from her job as a department store shipping clerk to sail there alone.She found her tribe at a modest Left Bank residence nicknamed the Beat Hotel: a group of expatriate writers and artists, including Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. One of them, the New York-born sculptor Robert Grosvenor, became her husband.In a 1986 radio commentary, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor remembered her arrival. “As I walked down the Boulevard Saint-Germain, I thought, ‘I can’t paint, I can’t write, and I can’t sing and dance like La Baker, but something great and wonderful is gonna happen to me.’ The myth of Europe made me believe in the possibilities.”Jessica B. Harris, author of “High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey From Africa to America,” has an explanation for the young Ms. Smart’s success. “Vertamae was a connector,” Ms. Harris said in an interview on Monday. “She made a way out of no way. She created this extraordinary legacy out of whole cloth — with probably not a lot of help.”In a 1981 interview with The New York Times, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recounted another Parisian experience, her exhausting but ultimately successful search in 1959 for the ingredients for a proper down-home New Year’s meal: black-eyed peas (essential for good luck), yams, ham hocks and something similar to collard greens. “The cornbread was no problem,” she remembered. “Even the French sold cornmeal.”Returning to the United States, where she lived in New York and Washington, she continued to explore her talents, doing improvisational acting in Tompkins Square Park. And she built a circle of notable acquaintances. Friends recalled arriving at dinner parties and finding the likes of James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka and Nikki Giovanni among the guests.According to Ms. Dash, the Grosvenors’ first dinner party after returning to New York was for a young Japanese artist whom Ms. Smart-Grosvenor found “very sweet and shy.” That guest was Yoko Ono, years before she met John Lennon.In addition to appearing frequently on the NPR series “All Things Considered,” Ms. Smart-Grosvenor hosted “Seasonings,” a series of NPR cooking specials, and was briefly the host of “The Americas’ Family Kitchen With Vertamae Grosvenor” on public television in the 1990s.In recent years, she had lived in Palm Key, S.C., a private island just one county away from her birthplace. Her survivors include two daughters, Chandra Weinland Brown, whose father is Oscar Weinland, a sculptor and visual artist, and Kali Grosvenor-Henry; and two grandchildren.In a 1988 interview with The Times, for an article that included her recipe for Frogmore stew (a k a, a low-country shrimp boil), she reiterated her lifelong passion for cooking. “Whatever goes into your mouth,” she observed, “should be something that has been thought about.”Then she offered perhaps the ultimate example of its primacy. “You can’t have a proper funeral without food,” she said. “When someone dies, the food, the spread, the feast has to be right so people will say, ‘She had a proper send-off.’”...

Sheforgen, Thomas Richard "TR" - Madison.com

Monday, September 19, 2016

Joan. Together they had been to over 50 countries. One highlight of his life was entering the cooking contest sponsored by the Wisconsin State Journal, where he captured the Grand Prize for his Bohemian Poppy Seed Cake, made from a traditional Czech family recipe. TR was the first man to win the Grand Prize. Thereafter, he was frequently recognized in local grocery stores as a cooking celebrity.He was preceded in death by his parents; and son, Timothy Diamond.TR is survived by his wife, Joan "Jo Jo"; children, Donald Diamond, Stephen Diamond, Thomas Diamond, Jonathan Diamond, Kristin Diamond, Peter Diamond and James Diamond; grandchildren, Brady, Jordan, Michael, Megan, Madeline and Nathan; and siblings Richard Sheforgen (Mary Kay), Jerome Sheforgen (Melanie), Joan Sheforgen and Judith Chaney.Memorial services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, at the AHLBERG FUNERAL CHAPEL. Cremation entrusted to Ahlberg Funeral Chapel and Crematory, Longmont, Colo.Memorial contributions in lieu of flowers can be made to the Fairview High School Organic Garden Club and sent in care of Ahlberg Funeral Chapel. Visit www.ahlbergfuneralchapel.com to share condolences.

Lee Papageorge, 'Mayor of Main Street,' 65 - Westport Now

Monday, August 15, 2016

And, of course, shared memories, handshakes and embraces. For decades the narrow, snug, albeit cozy eatery with a distinctive touch of Manhattan and an artsy, bohemian flare remained a popular Westport gathering spot, with al fresco get-togethers under the front awning.“Lee’s passing leaves a hole in the Westport community that will be impossible to fill,” said First Selectman Jim Marpe. He was the embodiment of the ‘small town citizen and businessman’ that we all want for our town. Lee Papageorge trying on a Bedford Square hard hat earlier this year. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Lynn U. Miller for WestportNow.com“He was always looking for ways to help people and our downtown and gave of himself unselfishly to make a better Westport. “Talking to Lee at our beloved Oscar’s always made the day feel good no matter what the challenge,” he added. “Thank you, Lee ,for serving great food and great community spirit, and thank you to the Papageorge family for sharing Lee with us for so many wonderful years.”Former First Selectman Gordon Joseloff, WestportNow editor and publisher, said Papageorge’s death coming so quickly after Oscar’s closing was a shock.“I wrote a commentary a week ago that said with Oscar’s closing, a little bit of Westport died,” he said. “With Lee’s death, a very big part of Westport has now died, too. “We all hoped he would pull through and finally be able to enjoy a normal life.” Lee Papageorge in his favorite barber’s chair perch. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Contributed photoRandy Herbertson, newly appointed president of the WDMA, which Papageorge founded, called Papageorge’s death “a shock and a loss to the community.”“He’s always been pivotal at what we do,” he said.Matthew Mandell, executive director of the Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce, echoed the sense of loss, saying it had been compounded by the closing of Oscar’s.“This is a loss for all communities in Westport from a character perspective and a business perspective,” Mandell said. “He represented the old school of Westport and firmly worked to better our community. He was involved in all different events and would go out of his way to help the community.”He added that the loss of Oscar’s is a loss of another eatery and community on Main Street, “and it will be hard to replace something like that.”Funeral arrangements were not immediately announced.Posted 08/08/16 at 03:47 PM Commentsa href="http://www.westportnow.com/pol...

Judy Feiffer, Who Helped Develop Two Top Memoirs, Dies at 87 - New York Times

Monday, July 18, 2016

Christina Crawford, died on June 27 at her home in Manhattan. She was 87.Her death was confirmed by Kate Feiffer, her daughter with her ex-husband, Jules Feiffer, the cartoonist and author.Her Bohemian upbringing in California initiated her into New York’s literary salons after she lived in Europe in her early 20s and studied under Gjon Mili, the Albanian-American photographer for Life magazine. Her portrait of Norman Mailer appeared on the jacket of the first edition of his 1959 book “Advertisements for Myself.”While Ms. Feiffer later became a novelist, she left her most indelible imprint on publishing by finding and honing talent in others. Among them was Ms. Angelou, a former dancer, singer, editor, freelance writer and a playwright and civil rights advocate, who in 1968 was depressed over the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on her 40th birthday.To hearten Ms. Angelou, her friend James Baldwin took her to dinner at the Feiffers’ Manhattan apartment. There, she entranced the host couple, the novelist Philip Roth, and the other guests with her stories, many of them harrowing, of growing up in the segregated South, being raped by her mother’s boyfriend and, after being shuttled among relatives, her pervasive sense of displacement, which, for a black girl, she recalled, was “the rust on the razor that threatens the throat.”“Mommie Dea...

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The last hours of Oakland's Ghost Ship warehouse - The Mercury News

Monday, December 26, 2016

Ship warehouse, and on that Friday night, he was also the doorman.He had spent the day getting ready for an electronic music party upstairs, arranging the sound system and cleaning up the fantastical bohemian space where he and about two dozen of his fellow artists lived. Before 9 p.m., the lanky jewelry maker with a scraggly beard and crescent tattoo on his cheekbone began welcoming visitors. They arrived in small groups, more than 100 guests in all from a tight-knit music and art scene — a transgender barista, a 35-year-old therapist who helped at-risk kids, a father of twin daughters, a couple in their 20s, he with a pencil-thin mustache, she with green glitter sparkling on her cheeks.As they entered this one-of-a-kind sanctuary to Oakland’s creative culture, they followed the pulsating beat to the second floor, up the single-file staircase made of scrap wood and pallet planks to a dance party promising good vibes and good friends.Max Ohr, a jewelry maker and Ghost Ship resident, who served as doorman the night of the fire. (Dai Sugano/Bay Area News Group) “I greeted almost every single person who walked through that door,” said Ohr, 26, “and I’m usually the one who says goodbye to them at the end of the night as well.”On this night, he would be screaming for them to escape.On this night, Ohr would be the doorman to an epic tragedy, Oakland’s deadliest fire ever.This was no natural disaster, no eart...

Ann Tower, influential Lexington gallery owner and artist, has died - Lexington Herald Leader

Monday, November 14, 2016

Kentucky in 1969.In a 1994 profile, she told the Herald-Leader that the department was “really in its heyday. There weren’t the budget cuts you see today. There were lots of visiting artists, a very bohemian feel. I just loved it.”She and Tharsing married in 1973, and Tower earned her master’s degree in fine arts in 1975. The family spent summers in Nova Scotia, on islands off the coast, and Tower said that fueled her art.“Unless you’re painting, you’re always so busy. ... Who’d have time to look at a view for hours and hours, or even days?” she said. “It’s wonderful to be out in nature.”Tower’s gallery ownership and management included co-founding and directing the Hackley Gallery in Winchester from 1995 to ’98. She said that helped her develop an expertise in folk art, and she then ran the Tower Cerlan Gallery with Gayle Cerlan.But her highest-profile venture was her own gallery, which opened in 2002 at the Downtown Arts Center. On several occasions, Tower said that she assumed there would be tough competition for the then-two-level Main Street space. But it turned out she was the only bidder for the spot. In a 2002 story, she said opening the gallery was her biggest success.When management of the Downtown Arts Center was transferred from LexArts to the cultural arts division of Lexington Parks and Recreation, the city elected to make the lower level of the gallery a public gallery, but Tower retained the second-floor space. She closed out 2014 with a retrospective show for the last Gallery Hop with the two-level gallery.Nan Plummer, president and CEO of LexArts, said Tower “will be terribly missed.”“We’re a city that’s in love with the arts, but there are relatively few commercial galleries, because it’s a very hard business,” she said. “Ann brought such grace” to a competitive business. She was never anything but lovely.”In 2015, she and her family celebrated Robert Tharsing’s first solo exhibit in New York City, just a few months before his death in December after a long battle with cancer.In his obituary, Tower said, “We’ve had such a wonderful life.”“Their lives were just all about the art they were making and the art they wanted to make,” said Lexington photographer Guy Mendes, a friend of Tower since they were students at UK. She later represented his work.“Ann did a lot for a lot of artists,” Mendes said. “She’s been an advocate.”Lina Tharsing said she hopes to continue the gallery downtown, but its future will depend on the artists Tower represented and whether they wish to continue.She described her mother as “an extremely exuberant woman” who was unusually accepting and understanding of others.“She was just an incredible optimist in that way,” she said. “She saw the best in everyone, and that just made her a pleasure to be around.”Lina Tharsing and Tower had been working with the Lexington Art League on a re...

Stepanek, Victor C., Sr. - Omaha World-Herald

Monday, November 07, 2016

Marty (Sandy); granddaughters, Shelby and Carly; sister Jane Vandeventer; nieces; nephews. VISITATION begins Tuesday at 4pm at the Mortuary. FUNERAL Wednesday at 11am at Mortuary. Interment, Bohemian Cemetery. Memorials to the family. KORISKO LARKIN STASKIEWICZ FUNERAL HOME 5108 "F" St. 402-731-1234 www.klsfuneralhome.com...

Arts|Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor Dies at 79; Celebrated Gullah Food and Culture - New York Times

Monday, September 26, 2016

Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recalled in an oral history interview for Tulane University in 1992. “We ate rice.”Growing up, she read about and became fascinated by the Beat Generation’s bohemian lives and Josephine Baker’s success in Paris. At 19, inspired and encouraged, Ms. Smart moved to Paris, having saved enough money from her job as a department store shipping clerk to sail there alone.She found her tribe at a modest Left Bank residence nicknamed the Beat Hotel: a group of expatriate writers and artists, including Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. One of them, the New York-born sculptor Robert Grosvenor, became her husband.In a 1986 radio commentary, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor remembered her arrival. “As I walked down the Boulevard Saint-Germain, I thought, ‘I can’t paint, I can’t write, and I can’t sing and dance like La Baker, but something great and wonderful is gonna happen to me.’ The myth of Europe made me believe in the possibilities.”Jessica B. Harris, author of “High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey From Africa to America,” has an explanation for the young Ms. Smart’s success. “Vertamae was a connector,” Ms. Harris said in an interview on Monday. “She made a way out of no way. She created this extraordinary legacy out of whole cloth — with probably not a lot of help.”In a 1981 interview with The New York Times, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recounted another Parisian experience, her exhausting but ultimately successful search in 1959 for the ingredients for a proper down-home New Year’s meal: black-eyed peas (essential for good luck), yams, ham hocks and something similar to collard greens. “The cornbread was no problem,” she remembered. “Even the French sold cornmeal.”Returning to the United States, where she lived in New York and Washington, she continued to explore her talents, doing improvisational acting in Tompkins Square Park. And she built a circle of notable acquaintances. Friends recalled arriving at dinner parties and finding the likes of James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka and Nikki Giovanni among the guests.According to Ms. Dash, the Grosvenors’ first dinner party after returning to New York was for a young Japanese artist whom Ms. Smart-Grosvenor found “very sweet and shy.” That guest was Yoko Ono, years before she met John Lennon.In addition to appearing frequently on the NPR series “All Things Considered,” Ms. Smart-Grosvenor hosted “Seasonings,” a series of NPR cooking specials, and was briefly the host of “The Americas’ Family Kitchen With Vertamae Grosvenor” on public television in the 1990s.In recent years, she had lived in Palm Key, S.C., a private island just one county away from her birthplace. Her survivors include two daughters, Chandra Weinland Brown, whose father is Oscar Weinland, a sculptor and visual artist, and Kali Grosvenor-Henry; and two grandchildren.In a 1988 interview with The Times, for an article that included her recipe for Frogmore stew (a k a, a low-country shrimp boil), she reiterated her lifelong passion for cooking. “Whatever goes into your mouth,” she observed, “should be something that has been thought about.”Then she offered perhaps the ultimate example of its primacy. “You can’t have a proper funeral without food,” she said. “When someone dies, the food, the spread, the feast has to be right so people will say, ‘She had a proper send-off.’”...

Sheforgen, Thomas Richard "TR" - Madison.com

Monday, September 19, 2016

Joan. Together they had been to over 50 countries. One highlight of his life was entering the cooking contest sponsored by the Wisconsin State Journal, where he captured the Grand Prize for his Bohemian Poppy Seed Cake, made from a traditional Czech family recipe. TR was the first man to win the Grand Prize. Thereafter, he was frequently recognized in local grocery stores as a cooking celebrity.He was preceded in death by his parents; and son, Timothy Diamond.TR is survived by his wife, Joan "Jo Jo"; children, Donald Diamond, Stephen Diamond, Thomas Diamond, Jonathan Diamond, Kristin Diamond, Peter Diamond and James Diamond; grandchildren, Brady, Jordan, Michael, Megan, Madeline and Nathan; and siblings Richard Sheforgen (Mary Kay), Jerome Sheforgen (Melanie), Joan Sheforgen and Judith Chaney.Memorial services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, at the AHLBERG FUNERAL CHAPEL. Cremation entrusted to Ahlberg Funeral Chapel and Crematory, Longmont, Colo.Memorial contributions in lieu of flowers can be made to the Fairview High School Organic Garden Club and sent in care of Ahlberg Funeral Chapel. Visit www.ahlbergfuneralchapel.com to share condolences.

Lee Papageorge, 'Mayor of Main Street,' 65 - Westport Now

Monday, August 15, 2016

And, of course, shared memories, handshakes and embraces. For decades the narrow, snug, albeit cozy eatery with a distinctive touch of Manhattan and an artsy, bohemian flare remained a popular Westport gathering spot, with al fresco get-togethers under the front awning.“Lee’s passing leaves a hole in the Westport community that will be impossible to fill,” said First Selectman Jim Marpe. He was the embodiment of the ‘small town citizen and businessman’ that we all want for our town. Lee Papageorge trying on a Bedford Square hard hat earlier this year. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Lynn U. Miller for WestportNow.com“He was always looking for ways to help people and our downtown and gave of himself unselfishly to make a better Westport. “Talking to Lee at our beloved Oscar’s always made the day feel good no matter what the challenge,” he added. “Thank you, Lee ,for serving great food and great community spirit, and thank you to the Papageorge family for sharing Lee with us for so many wonderful years.”Former First Selectman Gordon Joseloff, WestportNow editor and publisher, said Papageorge’s death coming so quickly after Oscar’s closing was a shock.“I wrote a commentary a week ago that said with Oscar’s closing, a little bit of Westport died,” he said. “With Lee’s death, a very big part of Westport has now died, too. “We all hoped he would pull through and finally be able to enjoy a normal life.” Lee Papageorge in his favorite barber’s chair perch. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Contributed photoRandy Herbertson, newly appointed president of the WDMA, which Papageorge founded, called Papageorge’s death “a shock and a loss to the community.”“He’s always been pivotal at what we do,” he said.Matthew Mandell, executive director of the Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce, echoed the sense of loss, saying it had been compounded by the closing of Oscar’s.“This is a loss for all communities in Westport from a character perspective and a business perspective,” Mandell said. “He represented the old school of Westport and firmly worked to better our community. He was involved in all different events and would go out of his way to help the community.”He added that the loss of Oscar’s is a loss of another eatery and community on Main Street, “and it will be hard to replace something like that.”Funeral arrangements were not immediately announced.Posted 08/08/16 at 03:47 PM Commentsa href="http://www.westportnow.com/pol...

Judy Feiffer, Who Helped Develop Two Top Memoirs, Dies at 87 - New York Times

Monday, July 18, 2016

Christina Crawford, died on June 27 at her home in Manhattan. She was 87.Her death was confirmed by Kate Feiffer, her daughter with her ex-husband, Jules Feiffer, the cartoonist and author.Her Bohemian upbringing in California initiated her into New York’s literary salons after she lived in Europe in her early 20s and studied under Gjon Mili, the Albanian-American photographer for Life magazine. Her portrait of Norman Mailer appeared on the jacket of the first edition of his 1959 book “Advertisements for Myself.”While Ms. Feiffer later became a novelist, she left her most indelible imprint on publishing by finding and honing talent in others. Among them was Ms. Angelou, a former dancer, singer, editor, freelance writer and a playwright and civil rights advocate, who in 1968 was depressed over the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on her 40th birthday.To hearten Ms. Angelou, her friend James Baldwin took her to dinner at the Feiffers’ Manhattan apartment. There, she entranced the host couple, the novelist Philip Roth, and the other guests with her stories, many of them harrowing, of growing up in the segregated South, being raped by her mother’s boyfriend and, after being shuttled among relatives, her pervasive sense of displacement, which, for a black girl, she recalled, was “the rust on the razor that threatens the throat.”“Mommie Dea...