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Ryan Funeral Home

44 E Main St
Marcellus, NY 13108
(315) 673-2345
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Marcellus NY Obituaries and Death Notices

ROSA SANDERS - Sumter Item

Monday, January 23, 2017

Cherryvale Baptist Church, Sumter. She retired from Crescent Tools where she made and retained many friendships.Surviving are her eight children, Teddy, Charles, Levi (Linda), Joice (Michael), Joan (Marcellus), Alva, Kevin and Roberta (Wayne); 23 grandchildren; 25 great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; two sisters, Evola Phillips and Mary Sanders; sisters-in-law, nephews, nieces, cousins; and a host of friends and loved ones.Homegoing services will be held at 1 p.m. today at St. Paul AME Church-Shaw, 1495 N. St. Paul Church Road, with the Rev. Eric R. Dent as pastor and eulogist.The family is receiving relatives and friends at the home, 425 Pitts Road.The funeral procession will leave from the home at 12:20 p.m.Floral bearers will be family and friends. Pallbearers will be nephews and friends.Burial will be in St. Paul AME Church Cemetery.Services are directed by the management and staff of Williams Funeral Home Inc., 821 N. Main St., Sumter. Online memorial messages may be sent to the family at williamsfuneralhome@sc.rr.com.Visit us on the Web at www.WilliamsFuneralHomeInc.com.

Patricia Galinet

Monday, July 11, 2016

Roger Edmond and Richard Vincent Quinn. Surviving are brothers, John "Jake" (Polly who was like a sister to mom) Quinn of Dana Point CA, David (Ruth) Quinn of Portage MI, Terry (Mary) Quinn of Marcellus MI. Also surviving are her four children, Terry (Kay) Galinet of Aurora Colorado, Mary Catherine "Kate" (Tom) Ward of Buffalo MN, Louise "Lou Anne" Galinet of Kalamazoo MI, and Michele "Shelly" (Dave) Kievit of Naples FL. Six grandchildren, Eric (Nicole) McNulty, Brian (Katie) McNulty, Kelly (Mark) Cox, Keith (Mary) Galinet, Erin Baumbach, Philip Cutshaw; two step grandchildren, Mandy (Mike) Gustufson, Jerrod (Allison) Ward, ten great-grandchildren and numerous nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews. Mom also leaves a fifth (adopted in her heart child) who has been a very big part of her life, Lorraine. And so many wonderful friends in the Tucson area who have been there throughout her journey with her cancer. A Memorial to Celebrate Pat will take place in Tucson AZ on Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at Tohono Chul Park (Lamonte House). A Memorial to Celebrate Mom will take place in Marcellus MI later this summer, date to be determined. Please contact one of her children to obtain details. Arrangements by ADAIR FUNERAL HOME, Avalon Chapel.

Muhammad Ali Knocks Out the Confederacy - Daily Beast

Monday, June 13, 2016

You better learn to fight before you start fightin’,” Martin said.Eighty-five pound Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. (Muhammad Ali), is shown posing at twelve in Louisville, Kentucky.Martin set to teaching the basics of boxing to this boy who still went by the name of Cassius Clay. The boy won a gold medal at the Olympics in Rome six years later. That was in 1960. Segregation remained generally so pervasive in Louisville that a local theatre barred black patrons from a performance of Porgy and Bess. Protesters challenged that exclusion, just as they had an unwritten rule prohibiting black men riding inside streetcars back in 1870, just as they would in coming years against racial discrimination in schools and libraries and housing. Thank You!You are now subscribed to the Daily Digest and Cheat Sheet. We will not share your email with anyone for any reasonIn the meantime, the young gold medalist went pro and became world champion. He announced that his name was now Muhammad Ali and that he had become a follower of the Nation of Islam. When the local draft board called Ali to military service, he announced that his religion precluded him from doing so. He proclaimed himself a conscientious objector and a full FBI investigation was followed by a hearing in the summer of 1966.The federally appointed hearing officer was an eminent retired state judge, who had long proven himself to be  a sterling example of Louisville’s more decent side. Graumann heard testimony from Ali, as well as the fighter’s mother and father and others. Graumann reported his finding to the U.S. Department of Justice.“On the basis of this record the hearing officer concluded that the registrant was sincere in his objection on religious grounds to participation in war in any form, and he recommended that the conscientious objector claim be sustained,” court papers note.Two years before, President Johnson had championed the Civil Rights Act, but his big worry now was the Vietnam War. He was anxious that the great Muhammad Ali not be seen as beating the draft as well as opponents in the ring. The Justice Department ignored Graumann’s finding and ordered Ali to report for induction.Ali was never told of Graumann’s recommendation. He did not need to be told what he stood to lose when he refused to step forward at the induction center. He immediately lost his boxing license. He was prosecuted for draft evasion and sentenced to five years in prison. He was...

Muhammad Ali, Boxing Legend, Dead at 74 - RollingStone.com

Monday, June 06, 2016

English, knew who Muhammad Ali was, and knew he was, as he himself said, "the greatest."Ali was born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. on January 17th, 1942, in Louisville, Kentucky. His father, Cassius, painted billboards and signs; his mother, Odessa, was a household domestic. When Clay was 12, his bicycle was stolen, and a police officer (who also happened to be a boxing coach) overheard the angry boy threatening harm if he ever found the thief and told him he'd better learn to box first.Clay took his advice. As an amateur, his record was 100-5. He won six state Golden Gloves titles and two national titles, then went to the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, where he won the Light Heavyweight gold medal. Returning from Rome, Clay went pro in October 1960. Around this time he hired Angelo Dundee, the man who would be his trainer until the boxer retired in 1981. 'Rolling Stone' Muhammad Ali covers.By the end of 1963, Clay was undefeated, with 15 of his 19 wins by knockout, and the top contender for Sonny Liston's Heavyweight title. A title fight was set for February 25th, 1964, in Miami, Florida and Clay was a 7-1 underdog. Nonetheless, he boasted repeatedly before the match that he would prevail over the champ, who he insulted as "a bear," because he could "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee." In what would become a standard pre-fight move, he even recited a poem to reporters about his impending victory. It ended: "Yes the crowd did not dream, when they put up the money/ That they would see a total eclipse of the Sonny."Clay was true to his word, dancing around the lumbering Liston and cutting him for the first time in his career. After six rounds, Clay was declared the winner by TKO when Liston didn't answer the bell. "I am the greatest!" the enthusiastic new champion exclaimed in an interview immediately after the match. "I'm the greatest thing that ever lived. I don't have a mark on my face, and I upset Sonny Liston, and I just turned 22 years old. I must be the greatest." Clay had become the youngest fighter to take the title from a reigning heavyweight champ – a record that would stand until it was broken in 1986 by 20-year-old Mike Tyson.Shortly after winning the title, Clay became a member of the Nation of Islam, and the sect's leader, Elijah Muhammad, personally renamed him Muhammad Ali. The boxer had been attending Nation of Islam meetings since 1961, and Malcolm X had served as his spiritual advisor, though Ali kept this connection secre...

Muhammad Ali: Boxing legend, activist and 'The Greatest' to a world of fans - CNN

Monday, June 06, 2016

Vietnam War and publicly speaking about racism in the United States.In youth, told he'd better learn to boxAli was born January 17, 1942, in Louisville as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. His interest in boxing began at age 12, after he reported a stolen bike to a local police officer, Joe Martin, who was also a boxing trainer.Martin told the young, infuriated Clay that if he wanted to pummel the person who stole his bike, he had better learn to box.Over the next six years, Clay won six Kentucky Golden Gloves championships, two National Golden Gloves championships and two National Amateur Athletic Union titles.Just months after he turned 18, Clay won a gold medal as a light heavyweight at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome, convincingly beating an experienced Polish fighter in the final.The story goes that when he returned to a hometown parade, even with the medal around his neck, he was refused service in a segregated Louisville restaurant because of his race. According to several reports, he threw the medal into a river out of anger. The story is disputed by people who say Ali misplaced the medal.Thirty-six years later, he was given a replacement medal and asked to light the cauldron at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, something he said was one of the greatest honors in his athletic career.img class="media__image media__image--responsive" alt="" data-src-mini="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-small-169.jpg" data-src-xsmall="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-medium-plus-169.jpg" data-src-small="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-large-169.jpg" data-src-medium="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-exlarge-169.jpg" data-src-large="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-super-169.jpg" data-src-full16x9="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-full-169.jpg" data-src-mini1x1="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-small-1...

The Kentucky boy named Cassius Clay who died as the greatest Muhammad Ali - Daily Mail

Monday, June 06, 2016

He father was a sign writer, his mother a domestic servant. He had one brother Rudolph, pictured standing over Ali in the family's Louisville homeClay - or Cassius Marcellus Clay Jnr to give him his full, grandoise name - was born in the West End district of Louisville, which was not the city’s most deprived area, on January 17, 1942. His father, also Cassius, was a sign-writer with artistic ambitions and his mother, Odessa, a domestic servant. Because his parents had jobs, owned their own house and had only two children, the young Cassius was not brought up in the desperate poverty that fired the ambitions of many black fighters at the time.His father was a loudmouth (a trait inherited by his elder son), a drinker and a womaniser. The names of father and son derived from a 19th-century white Kentucky farmer and soldier who became an abolitionist and freed his own slaves.The future fighter’s great-grandfather worked for the farmer Cassius Clay, and may have been a freed slave himself. Some years after the farmer’s death, the boxer’s father was given the name as a mark of respect. His mother had some white blood, including that of an Irish grandfather from County Clare who had married a black woman.When, in the early Sixties, he joined the Black Muslims (or Nation of Islam, as they re-named themselves) his white blood became an embarrassment – the Muslims claimed all white people were ‘evil’ - though in later life he managed to overcome those scruples and visited his ancestor’s home in Ireland.The young Cassius took up boxing when someone stole his new bicycle and he reported the theft to a policeman. The policeman was Joe Martin, who ran a boxing club in Louisville which he persuaded him to join at the age of 12. He took eagerly to the rigours and disciplines of the sport, rising before dawn for road runs and gym work. Martin was his trainer until he turned pro six years later. Muhammad Ali lands a right on Joe Frazier's head in the 2nd round during a clash in 1975. Ali held his title 10/1 defeating Frazier by TKO in the 14th round Ali (...

Muhammad Ali was a man who 'stood for the world' - The Globe and Mail (subscription)

Monday, June 06, 2016

Africa.“I don’t call him the best boxer of all time, but he’s the greatest human being I ever met,” Mr. Foreman said. “To this day he’s the most exciting person I ever met in my life.”Born Cassius Marcellus Clay on Jan. 17, 1942, in Louisville, Mr. Ali began boxing at age 12 after his new bicycle was stolen and he vowed to policeman Joe Martin that he would “whup” the person who took it.He was only 89 pounds at the time, but Mr. Martin began training him at his boxing gym, the beginning of a six-year amateur career that ended with the light heavyweight Olympic gold medal in 1960.Mr. Ali had already encountered racism. On boxing trips, he and his amateur teammates would have to stay in the car while Mr. Martin bought them hamburgers. When he returned to Louisville with his gold medal, the Chamber of Commerce presente...

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ROSA SANDERS - Sumter Item

Monday, January 23, 2017

Cherryvale Baptist Church, Sumter. She retired from Crescent Tools where she made and retained many friendships.Surviving are her eight children, Teddy, Charles, Levi (Linda), Joice (Michael), Joan (Marcellus), Alva, Kevin and Roberta (Wayne); 23 grandchildren; 25 great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; two sisters, Evola Phillips and Mary Sanders; sisters-in-law, nephews, nieces, cousins; and a host of friends and loved ones.Homegoing services will be held at 1 p.m. today at St. Paul AME Church-Shaw, 1495 N. St. Paul Church Road, with the Rev. Eric R. Dent as pastor and eulogist.The family is receiving relatives and friends at the home, 425 Pitts Road.The funeral procession will leave from the home at 12:20 p.m.Floral bearers will be family and friends. Pallbearers will be nephews and friends.Burial will be in St. Paul AME Church Cemetery.Services are directed by the management and staff of Williams Funeral Home Inc., 821 N. Main St., Sumter. Online memorial messages may be sent to the family at williamsfuneralhome@sc.rr.com.Visit us on the Web at www.WilliamsFuneralHomeInc.com.

Patricia Galinet

Monday, July 11, 2016

Roger Edmond and Richard Vincent Quinn. Surviving are brothers, John "Jake" (Polly who was like a sister to mom) Quinn of Dana Point CA, David (Ruth) Quinn of Portage MI, Terry (Mary) Quinn of Marcellus MI. Also surviving are her four children, Terry (Kay) Galinet of Aurora Colorado, Mary Catherine "Kate" (Tom) Ward of Buffalo MN, Louise "Lou Anne" Galinet of Kalamazoo MI, and Michele "Shelly" (Dave) Kievit of Naples FL. Six grandchildren, Eric (Nicole) McNulty, Brian (Katie) McNulty, Kelly (Mark) Cox, Keith (Mary) Galinet, Erin Baumbach, Philip Cutshaw; two step grandchildren, Mandy (Mike) Gustufson, Jerrod (Allison) Ward, ten great-grandchildren and numerous nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews. Mom also leaves a fifth (adopted in her heart child) who has been a very big part of her life, Lorraine. And so many wonderful friends in the Tucson area who have been there throughout her journey with her cancer. A Memorial to Celebrate Pat will take place in Tucson AZ on Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at Tohono Chul Park (Lamonte House). A Memorial to Celebrate Mom will take place in Marcellus MI later this summer, date to be determined. Please contact one of her children to obtain details. Arrangements by ADAIR FUNERAL HOME, Avalon Chapel.

Muhammad Ali Knocks Out the Confederacy - Daily Beast

Monday, June 13, 2016

You better learn to fight before you start fightin’,” Martin said.Eighty-five pound Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. (Muhammad Ali), is shown posing at twelve in Louisville, Kentucky.Martin set to teaching the basics of boxing to this boy who still went by the name of Cassius Clay. The boy won a gold medal at the Olympics in Rome six years later. That was in 1960. Segregation remained generally so pervasive in Louisville that a local theatre barred black patrons from a performance of Porgy and Bess. Protesters challenged that exclusion, just as they had an unwritten rule prohibiting black men riding inside streetcars back in 1870, just as they would in coming years against racial discrimination in schools and libraries and housing. Thank You!You are now subscribed to the Daily Digest and Cheat Sheet. We will not share your email with anyone for any reasonIn the meantime, the young gold medalist went pro and became world champion. He announced that his name was now Muhammad Ali and that he had become a follower of the Nation of Islam. When the local draft board called Ali to military service, he announced that his religion precluded him from doing so. He proclaimed himself a conscientious objector and a full FBI investigation was followed by a hearing in the summer of 1966.The federally appointed hearing officer was an eminent retired state judge, who had long proven himself to be  a sterling example of Louisville’s more decent side. Graumann heard testimony from Ali, as well as the fighter’s mother and father and others. Graumann reported his finding to the U.S. Department of Justice.“On the basis of this record the hearing officer concluded that the registrant was sincere in his objection on religious grounds to participation in war in any form, and he recommended that the conscientious objector claim be sustained,” court papers note.Two years before, President Johnson had championed the Civil Rights Act, but his big worry now was the Vietnam War. He was anxious that the great Muhammad Ali not be seen as beating the draft as well as opponents in the ring. The Justice Department ignored Graumann’s finding and ordered Ali to report for induction.Ali was never told of Graumann’s recommendation. He did not need to be told what he stood to lose when he refused to step forward at the induction center. He immediately lost his boxing license. He was prosecuted for draft evasion and sentenced to five years in prison. He was...

Muhammad Ali, Boxing Legend, Dead at 74 - RollingStone.com

Monday, June 06, 2016

English, knew who Muhammad Ali was, and knew he was, as he himself said, "the greatest."Ali was born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. on January 17th, 1942, in Louisville, Kentucky. His father, Cassius, painted billboards and signs; his mother, Odessa, was a household domestic. When Clay was 12, his bicycle was stolen, and a police officer (who also happened to be a boxing coach) overheard the angry boy threatening harm if he ever found the thief and told him he'd better learn to box first.Clay took his advice. As an amateur, his record was 100-5. He won six state Golden Gloves titles and two national titles, then went to the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, where he won the Light Heavyweight gold medal. Returning from Rome, Clay went pro in October 1960. Around this time he hired Angelo Dundee, the man who would be his trainer until the boxer retired in 1981. 'Rolling Stone' Muhammad Ali covers.By the end of 1963, Clay was undefeated, with 15 of his 19 wins by knockout, and the top contender for Sonny Liston's Heavyweight title. A title fight was set for February 25th, 1964, in Miami, Florida and Clay was a 7-1 underdog. Nonetheless, he boasted repeatedly before the match that he would prevail over the champ, who he insulted as "a bear," because he could "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee." In what would become a standard pre-fight move, he even recited a poem to reporters about his impending victory. It ended: "Yes the crowd did not dream, when they put up the money/ That they would see a total eclipse of the Sonny."Clay was true to his word, dancing around the lumbering Liston and cutting him for the first time in his career. After six rounds, Clay was declared the winner by TKO when Liston didn't answer the bell. "I am the greatest!" the enthusiastic new champion exclaimed in an interview immediately after the match. "I'm the greatest thing that ever lived. I don't have a mark on my face, and I upset Sonny Liston, and I just turned 22 years old. I must be the greatest." Clay had become the youngest fighter to take the title from a reigning heavyweight champ – a record that would stand until it was broken in 1986 by 20-year-old Mike Tyson.Shortly after winning the title, Clay became a member of the Nation of Islam, and the sect's leader, Elijah Muhammad, personally renamed him Muhammad Ali. The boxer had been attending Nation of Islam meetings since 1961, and Malcolm X had served as his spiritual advisor, though Ali kept this connection secre...

Muhammad Ali: Boxing legend, activist and 'The Greatest' to a world of fans - CNN

Monday, June 06, 2016

Vietnam War and publicly speaking about racism in the United States.In youth, told he'd better learn to boxAli was born January 17, 1942, in Louisville as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. His interest in boxing began at age 12, after he reported a stolen bike to a local police officer, Joe Martin, who was also a boxing trainer.Martin told the young, infuriated Clay that if he wanted to pummel the person who stole his bike, he had better learn to box.Over the next six years, Clay won six Kentucky Golden Gloves championships, two National Golden Gloves championships and two National Amateur Athletic Union titles.Just months after he turned 18, Clay won a gold medal as a light heavyweight at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome, convincingly beating an experienced Polish fighter in the final.The story goes that when he returned to a hometown parade, even with the medal around his neck, he was refused service in a segregated Louisville restaurant because of his race. According to several reports, he threw the medal into a river out of anger. The story is disputed by people who say Ali misplaced the medal.Thirty-six years later, he was given a replacement medal and asked to light the cauldron at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, something he said was one of the greatest honors in his athletic career.img class="media__image media__image--responsive" alt="" data-src-mini="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-small-169.jpg" data-src-xsmall="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-medium-plus-169.jpg" data-src-small="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-large-169.jpg" data-src-medium="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-exlarge-169.jpg" data-src-large="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-super-169.jpg" data-src-full16x9="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-full-169.jpg" data-src-mini1x1="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160604023541-quote-ali-liston-bad-man-small-1...

The Kentucky boy named Cassius Clay who died as the greatest Muhammad Ali - Daily Mail

Monday, June 06, 2016

He father was a sign writer, his mother a domestic servant. He had one brother Rudolph, pictured standing over Ali in the family's Louisville homeClay - or Cassius Marcellus Clay Jnr to give him his full, grandoise name - was born in the West End district of Louisville, which was not the city’s most deprived area, on January 17, 1942. His father, also Cassius, was a sign-writer with artistic ambitions and his mother, Odessa, a domestic servant. Because his parents had jobs, owned their own house and had only two children, the young Cassius was not brought up in the desperate poverty that fired the ambitions of many black fighters at the time.His father was a loudmouth (a trait inherited by his elder son), a drinker and a womaniser. The names of father and son derived from a 19th-century white Kentucky farmer and soldier who became an abolitionist and freed his own slaves.The future fighter’s great-grandfather worked for the farmer Cassius Clay, and may have been a freed slave himself. Some years after the farmer’s death, the boxer’s father was given the name as a mark of respect. His mother had some white blood, including that of an Irish grandfather from County Clare who had married a black woman.When, in the early Sixties, he joined the Black Muslims (or Nation of Islam, as they re-named themselves) his white blood became an embarrassment – the Muslims claimed all white people were ‘evil’ - though in later life he managed to overcome those scruples and visited his ancestor’s home in Ireland.The young Cassius took up boxing when someone stole his new bicycle and he reported the theft to a policeman. The policeman was Joe Martin, who ran a boxing club in Louisville which he persuaded him to join at the age of 12. He took eagerly to the rigours and disciplines of the sport, rising before dawn for road runs and gym work. Martin was his trainer until he turned pro six years later. Muhammad Ali lands a right on Joe Frazier's head in the 2nd round during a clash in 1975. Ali held his title 10/1 defeating Frazier by TKO in the 14th round Ali (...

Muhammad Ali was a man who 'stood for the world' - The Globe and Mail (subscription)

Monday, June 06, 2016

Africa.“I don’t call him the best boxer of all time, but he’s the greatest human being I ever met,” Mr. Foreman said. “To this day he’s the most exciting person I ever met in my life.”Born Cassius Marcellus Clay on Jan. 17, 1942, in Louisville, Mr. Ali began boxing at age 12 after his new bicycle was stolen and he vowed to policeman Joe Martin that he would “whup” the person who took it.He was only 89 pounds at the time, but Mr. Martin began training him at his boxing gym, the beginning of a six-year amateur career that ended with the light heavyweight Olympic gold medal in 1960.Mr. Ali had already encountered racism. On boxing trips, he and his amateur teammates would have to stay in the car while Mr. Martin bought them hamburgers. When he returned to Louisville with his gold medal, the Chamber of Commerce presente...